Posts Tagged women’s suffrage

Collecting Suffrage: Photograph of Mrs Fawcett, 1890

 

Today I offer you a studio photograph of Millicent Garrett Fawcett by W & D Downey. Published by Cassell & Co, 1890. She was 43 years old and had already been a leading light of the women’s suffrage movement for over 20 years.

A very good image – mounted. Suitable for framing. £40 + VAT in UK & EU.

In the past I have been concerned about the low profile afforded popularly to Mrs Fawcett. Indeed, in 2013 I wrote a post on the subject: Make Millicent Fawcett Visible. 

And in 2016 when there was a suggestion that there should be a statue of a ‘suffragette’ in Parliament Square I did point out that there was already one nearby to Mrs Pankhurst (which I was also determined would not be moved) and one, so often forgotten, to the suffragette movement in general, just down Victoria Street in Christchurch Gardens. That resulted in another post – on Suffragette Statues.

As we all know, the idea of a ‘suffragette’ statue in Parliament Square morphed, thanks to input from Sam Smethers and the Fawcett Society, into the already well-loved statue of Mrs Fawcett. So that she is now indeed publicly visible.

Yesterday’s photograph of Mrs Pankhurst proved very popular, but if you would like demonstrate your loyalty to Mrs Fawcett, here is an excellent opportunity to acquire a photograph of her with which to adorn your desk or wall.

Do email me if you’re interested in buying. elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com

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Collecting Suffrage: Photograph Of Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst c 1907

This photograph of Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst probably dates from c 1907, taken at her desk in Clement’s Inn, headquarters of the Women’s Social and Political Union.

The photograph comes from the collection of Isabel Seymour, who was an early WSPU supporter working in the WSPU office.

The photograph is mounted and is 15 x 20 cm (6″ x 8″) and is in good condition for its age. SOLD

Do email me if interested in buying. elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com

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Collecting Suffrage: The Church League For Women’s Suffrage Paper

 

The paper of the Church League for Women’s Suffrage was published monthly from January 1912. This is the issue for 9 September 1912. Issues of the paper are scarce and this one is in good condition for its age – packed with information. For sale – SOLD

If interested email me: elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com

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Books And Ephemera By And About Women for Sale: Catalogue 201

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woman and her Sphere

Catalogue 201

 

 

 See # 31A

 

Elizabeth Crawford

5 Owen’s Row

London EC1V 4NP

0207-278-9479

elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com

 

Index to Catalogue

Suffrage Non-fiction: Items 1-7

Suffrage Biography: Items 8-13

Suffrage Ephemera: Items 14-65

Suffrage Ephemera from the Isabel Seymour Collection 66-85

Suffrage Postcards: Real Photographic: Items 86-133

Suffrage Postcards: Suffrage Artist: Items 134-136

Suffrage Postcards: Commercial Comic: Items 137-156

General Non-fiction: Items 157-322

General Biography: Items 323-387

General Ephemera: Items 388-508

General Postcards: Items 509-516

Music Hall Sheet Music & Postcards: Items 517-530

General Fiction: Items 530-614

Women and the First World War: Items 615-623

Suffrage Non-fiction

 

  1. CRAWFORD, Elizabeth Art and Suffrage: a biographical dictionary of suffrage artists Francis Boutle 2018

Discusses the lives and work of over 100 artists, each of whom made a positive contribution to the women’s suffrage campaign. Most, but not all, the artists were women, many belonging to the two suffrage artists’ societies – the Artists’ Suffrage League and the Suffrage Atelier. Working in a variety of media – producing cartoons, posters, banners, postcards, china, and jewellery – the artists promoted the suffrage message in such a way as to make the campaign the most visual of all those conducted by contemporary pressure groups. Mint – NEW

[14963]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. DOBBIE, B.M. Willmott Dobbie A Nest of Suffragettes in Somerset: Eagle House, Batheaston Batheaston Society 1979

The story of the Blathwayt family and their involvement in the women’s suffrage movement – copiously illustrated by the photographs taken by Col Blathwayt. Soft covers – fine condition – quite scarce

[14905]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. METCALFE, A.E. Woman’s Effort: a chronicle of British women’s fifty years’ struggle for citizenship (1865-1914) B.H. Blackwell 1917

Essential for suffrage studies – the nearest thing there is to a contemporary study of the WSPU.  In very good condition – and very scarce. In very good condition – with the remains of the dustwrapper present…though in pieces. On the free front endpaper a previous owner has noted ‘St Cath burninng p 288’ – referring to the arson attack on St Catheriine’s Churcch, Hatcham

[14896]                                                                                                                  £95.00

  1. MORGAN, David Suffragists and Liberals: the politics of woman suffrage in Britain Basil Blackwell 1975

Fine in d/w

[12133]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. PAXTON, Naomi Stage Rights!: the Actresses’ Franchise League, Activism and Politics 1908-58 Manchester University Press 2018

Naomi Paxton has mined a wide range of sources to demonstrate the society’s many facets over its long life. Paxton analyses the networks that contributed to the cohesiveness of the AFL, noting that, with members of leading theatrical families, such as the Moores and the Forbes-Robertsons, prepared to take the lead, less well-established AFL members had the assurance of influential allies. An excellent contribution to ‘suffrage studies’. Mint

[14902]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. STRACHEY, Ray The Cause: a short history of the women’s movement in Great Britain G. Bell 1928

This copy belonged to Lord McGregor – author of ‘Divorce in England’, a book that includes a very useful bibliography of works on women’s rights. He has laid in the book a collection of newspaper cuttings, from the 1950s to 1970s, relating to the position of women. The copy of the book is in good condition – but he had bought it as an ex-library copy and has added a few pencilled notes on the back pastedown. An interesting association copy.

[12059]                                                                                                                  £55.00

  1. HOLDSWORTH, W..A. The Married Women’s Property Act 1882 George Routledge 1882

A study of the 1882 Married Women’s Property Act, by a Gray’s Inn lawyer. In his introduction he hails it as ‘undoubtedly one of the most important measures of social legislation to which Parliament has of recent years given iits assent. Laid in is a copy of the 1882 Act itself, together with an 1893 Act to Amend the Married Women’s Property Act, 1882. In good condition

[14900]                                                                                                                  £55.00

 

Suffrage Biography

 

  1. (DUNIWAY) Ruth Barnes Moynihan Rebel for Rights: Abigail Scott Duniway Yale University Press 1983

Abigal Scott Duniway (1834-1915), American suffragist, journalist, and national leader.  Fine in d/w

[1205]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. (KENNEY) Annie Kenney Memories of a Militant Edward Arnold 1924

Annie Kenney’s autobiography. Published in the WSPU colours – purple cloth, with white and green stripes. – the cloth covers have suffered from damp – but internally the book is in very good, clean, tight condition. A very scarce book

[14907]                                                                                                                SOLD

  1. (LYTTON) Lady Betty Balfour (ed) Letters of Constance Lytton William Heinemann 1925

Inlaid are cuttings about Lady Constance and an intriguing photograph of  a portrait of her in which she is wearing both her hunger-strike medal and a ‘Holloway’ brooch. It’s not an image that I’ve seen before.  Purple cloth cover, with design by Sylvia Pankhurst in purple, white and green (to match the cover of ‘Prisons and Prisoners’), is a little knocked and rubbed – internally good

[14085]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. (MILL) John Stuart Mill Autobiography Longmans, Green 1873

First edition in original green cloth. Internally very good – a little wear at top and bottom of spine

[14974]                                                                                                                  £75.00

  1. (MONTEFIORE) Dora Montefiore From a Victorian to a Modern E. Archer 1927

Autobiography of a life-long member of the awkward squad – suffragist and socialist.  Very good – scarce

[14914]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. (SHARP) EVELYN SHARP Unfinished Adventure: selected reminiscences from an Englishwoman’s life John Lane 1933

Evelyn Sharp was a ‘New Woman’ – novelist, journalist and active suffragette. This is her autobiography. Very good -blue cloth covers slightly faced and small nick at top of spine –  scarce

[14912]                                                                                                                  £70.00

Suffrage Ephemera

 

  1. AINSLIE, Kathleen Votes for Catharine Susan and Me Castell Bros, no date (c 1910)

Most delightful children’s picture book – containing all the stereotypes of the militant suffrage campaign depicted in the most droll, disarming and attractive fashion. As far as I know it is the only children’s book centred on the suffrage campaign – and I love it..I have done some research on the author/artist – about whom nothing seems to be known – and discover that she was born in 1858, one of the several children of the vicar of Langport, Somerset. It would seem that it was only after his death in 1903, after which she lived with her mother, whose name, interestingly, was Catharine Susan, that Kathleen produced about a dozen children’s books. In 1911, around the time ‘Votes for Catharine Susan and Me’ was published, mother and daughter were living at Broadstone in Dorset. She apparently published nothing more and died in 1936.

The illustrations in this copy are beautifully crisp – wonderful colour (it was printed in Bavaria) – and the book, in pictorial wrap-around cover, is in goodish condition although the pages have been strengthened some time in the past wiith discreet taping to strenthen the slimspine.. An ink inscription on the title page reads ‘K.P.’ from ‘J.M.A.’

[14906]                                                                                                    SOLD

  1. BOOKPLATE OF VERA L.HOLME, DESIGNED BY JESSIE M. KING

Appropriately this lovely bookplate is attached to a copy of  Edward Gordon Graig’s book ‘Nothing or The Bookplate’, with a handlist by E. Garrick, J.M. Dent, 1931. Among Craig’s many pursuits was the art of bookplate design and this edition includes 25 of  bookplates he designed for, among other, his mother, Ellen Terry, his sister Edith Craig, Pamela Colman Smith, and Isadora Duncan.

After the end of the First World War Vera Holme was part of ‘Greengates’ artiistic community in Kirkcudbrightshire which centred on Jessie M. King, which explains the commissioning of the bookplate – which references Vera (presumably) as a Joan of Arc figure

First edition thus (an edition with more bookplates had been published by Chatto & Windus in 1924).  Like that edition, this was printed at the Curwen Press. In very good condition, no dustwrapper. Vera Holme’s bookplate is in fine condition.

[14971]                                                                                                     SOLD

  1. CAHILL, Richard Staunton A Lecture on Woman’s Rights, Cockermouth, 1888

The painting depicts a woman in neat, plain attire standing on a platform addressing an (unseen) audience. Behind her is a poster that reads ‘A Lecture on Woman’s Rights Will be Delivered [?] in the Lecture Hall of the Young Men’s Christian Association Cockermouth on Wednesday Mrs Smith.’

The painting is signed by the artist Richard Staunton Cahill and is dated 1888.

I can certainly place the artist, Irish-born though he was, very close to Cockermouth in the late 1870s/early 1880s.

The artist: -Richard Staunton Cahill – born c 1827 in Co Clare. Son of Charles Staunton Cahill who, in 1828/9, was a leading supporter of Catholic Emancipation and of Daniel O’Connell (the Liberator)

In 1850 Richard Cahill entered the Royal Hibernian Academy. He lived in Dublin but by 1863 had moved to London and then by 1875 was living in Nottingham and teaching at the Government School of Art there. He still had a Nottingham address in 1877 but by 1879 when he submitted works to the Royal Hibernian Academy of Arts his address was given as ‘Keswick’.

In the 1881 census he was living, with his sister, Agnes, in a boarding house in High Street, Crosthwaite. He gave his occupation as ‘artist’, ‘master School of Art’ – so it is possible that he was still employed in Nottingham and spent holidays in Cumberland.

In 1882 when he submitted works to the Irish Exhibition of Arts and Manufactures in Dublin his address was again given as ‘Keswick’.

On 24 March 1883 ‘The Graphic’ printed a poem Cahill had written protesting against the threat to ‘Lakeland’ posed by the new railway and roads. He must have been closely associated with Canon Rawnsley (who was about to move into Crosthwaite Vicarage) and the Lake District Defence Society. With his nephew (I think) C.S. Cahill, Richard Cahill wrote several songs – ‘Songs of the Lake’ – including ‘Beautiful Keswick’ and ‘Charming Windermere’.

As to the subject of the painting: – I know of a couple of women’s suffrage lectures given in Cockermouth in the early years of the suffrage campaign. On 1872 Friday 24 May 1872 a travelling speaker, Jessie Craigen, gave a lecture on ‘Women’s Rights at the Court House, Cockermouth – but I know from written descriptions that Jessie Craigen was large and blowsy – the antithesis of the neat figure in this painting.

Lydia Becker, the leader of the women’s suffrage meeting in Manchester, held a meeting in Cockermouth on Tuesday 17 January 1882 – but, again, her features are very distinctive and these are not they. For full details of the 19th century women’s suffrage campaign in Cumberland see my Women’s Suffrage Movement: a regional survey p 24.

I suspect that the woman lecturer is in fact Miss Mary Smith of Finkle Street in Carlisle, whose ‘Autobiography of Mary Smith: schoolmistress and non-conformist’ was published in 1892.  For many years Mary Smith ran a girls’ school from her home and was renowned for giving Penny Readings.

In 1868 she initiated a correspondence with Lydia Becker, who addressed her in a letter of 20 May 1868, as ‘Mrs Smith’.

On 2 April 1869, with Mary Smith’s encouragement, Miss Becker gave a ‘woman’s rights’ lecture in Carlisle, which was followed by the founding of the Carlisle branch of the National Society for Women’s Suffrage, with Mary Smith as its honorary secretary. The Carlisle branch was still in existence until at least 1872 but then fades from view.

In her autobiography Mary Smith is at pains to describe how she bought ‘plain and comfortable clothing’, writing ‘Nor was I ever ashamed of being plainly dressed’. One who knew her commented that ‘not unfrequently her dress was decidedly antiquated and old fashioned.’ The figure in the painting cuts a very neat figure, attired certainly in plain and comfortable clothing. Mary Smith’s Autobiography does not include any representation of her, alas, but I feel as certain as one can be – with no absolute proof – that it is she who is delivering the ‘Woman’s Rights’ lecture from that platform. I have, as yet, been unable to find a newspaper report of the lecture.

Mary Smith died in 1891 and had been ill for a few years before – so I rather think that the lecture had taken place considerably earlier than the date given on the painting. By 1888 (by which time Cahill can be found at a London address) ‘Woman’s Rights’ was no longer really the term that would be used. The suffrage campaign had been making some headway and by 1888 the term ‘women’s suffrage’ would have been more likely to have been used than ‘woman’s rights’, which was more of a 1870s usage.

The painting – oil on canvas – is in very good condition.

[13698]                                                                                                 SOLD

  1. CAZALET, Thelma Mrs Pankhurst

An article about Mrs Pankhurst by Thelma Cazalet (MP for Islington East) in ‘The Listener’ (6 Nov 1935) in a series ironically titled ‘I Knew A Man’. See also item ??. A 4-pp article – including photographs. The late-lamented ‘The Listener’ was a substantial journal in those days – this issue is 55 pages – in goodish condition – the front page is present but detached.

[14454]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. CHURCH LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Mission Week 1912 CLWS 1912

Single-sided leaflet (22cm high x 14cm wide) giving details of the main events of Mission Week. In good condition

[14541]                                                                                                                  S0LD

  1. CICELY HAMILTON

photographed by Lena Connell, 50 Grove End Road, London NW. The close-up photograph is mounted on stiff card, which carries the logo of the Suffrage Shop and the words ‘Published by the Suffrage Shop’.Her name has been scratched on the emulsion, presumbably by the photographer, and Cicely Hamilton has signed the image, which probably dates from late-1909/1910. In fine condition – overall 20 cm high x 13 cm wide.

[14167]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. DYSON, Will Cartoons The Daily Herald 1914

A Second Collection of cartoons drawn by the celebrated Australian cartoonist, Will Dyson (1880-1938), and published in ‘The Daily Herald’. Among the 40 are 6 directly related to the suffrage campaign. In fair condition  the middle 2pp have come loose from the staples and the edges are a little rubbed. Could be broken up and the prints framed individually. Large format – 36 x 26 cm – paper covers

[13801]                                                                                                                  £85.00

  1. ELMY, Elizabeth Wostenholme Woman’s Franchise: the need of the hour ILP 2nd ed, no date [1907]

A campaigner for women’s suffrage since the mid-1860s, she had put aside a lifetime’s aversion to party politics and joined the Manchester ILP in 1904. This article was originally published in the ‘Westminster Review’. In her concise style she analyses the events of the previous 40 years and demands that Liberal MPs who profess to support women’s suffrage honour their pledges. Very good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[15002]                                                                                                                  £65.00

  1. [EMILY WILDING DAVISON] THE SUFFRAGETTE FRIDAY 13 JUNE 1913

‘Great Newspapers Reprinted’ facsimile, published c 1974 – the Emily Wilding Davison memorial issue. A nefarious dealer has attempted to remove the ‘British Museum Library’  stamp that indicates that this is reprinted from the original – but I can assure you that this is a facsmilie not the real thing! Fine

[14434]                                                                                                                  £20.00

 

See # 23

  1. ‘HOLLOWAY PRISON’ BROOCH

designed by Sylvia Pankhurst and was awarded to members of the WSPU who had been imprisoned. It was first mentioned in the WSPU paper, ‘Votes for Women’, on 16 April 1909 and was described as ‘the Victoria Cross of the Union’. [It pre-dated the Hunger-Strike medal]. The design of the brooch is of the portcullis symbol of the House of Commons, the gate and hanging chains are in silver, and the superimposed broad arrow (the convict symbol) is in purple, white and green enamel. The piece is marked ‘silver’ and carries the maker’s name – Toye & Co, London, who were also responsible for the hunger strike medals. The brooch is in fine condition. A very scarce item

[14881]                                                                                                             £5,000.00

  1. INTERNATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE CONGRESS

Budapest June 15-20 1913. This is a small advertising paper label/stamp (it has a sticky back) for the Congress – showing two graceful women stretching their arms, to hold hands across the globe. The type-face is very 1913. A pretty and interesting memento of the last pre-war international women’s gathering. Fine -amazingly ephemeral – and  unusual. With the background printed in blue

[14505]                                                                                                                  £85.00

  1. LETTER FROM LAURA MCLAREN, BARONESS ABERCONWAY

to Willoughby Dickinson MP, dated 21 May 1914, written from her London home, 43 Belgrave Sq., in support of his Amendment to the British Nationality and Status of Aliens Bill then before Parliament. As she writes ‘..you seek to enact that no woman can be forced to accept a foreign nationality against her will’ and that she had ‘brought this subject before many meetings of Women’s Liberal Associations and have never failed to secure a unanimous vote as to the desirability of this change’. She also included a note: ‘lady Aberconway desires to direct your attention to the position of Married women under the British Nationality and Status of Aliens Bill…She hopes that you will support those amendments to this Bill which give to British women who marry Aliens the right to retain British nationality.’ The Amendment failed. Laura McLaren had been campaigning for women’s suffrage since her youth in the early 1870s. Dickinson was an active supporter of women’s suffrage and women’s interests throughout his parliamentary career. Excellent mss letter and note – fine condition

[14976]                                                                                                                  £75.00

 

  1. MILLICENT GARRETT FAWCETT

studio photograph by W & D. Downey, no date (probably 1880s). Mounted – very good image – with narrow strip at left-hand edge of mount where it may have been fixed in an album

[14365]                                                                                                                  £40.00

  1. MISS EMILY FAITHFULL

studio photograph by W & D Downey, 57 & 61 Ebury Street, London, together with a printed brief biography.

[14029]                                                                                                                  £40.00

  1. MISS MORGAN, OF BRECON The Duties of Citizenship Women’s Local Government Society c 1912

Extracts reprinted from a paper read at the Annual Conference of the National Union of Women Workers, Manchester, October 27th 1896. By the time this leafet was issued Miss Morgan had been Mayor of Brecon, 1911-12. 4-pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[13833]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR OPPOSING WOMAN SUFFRAGE Mr J.R. Tolmie’s Reply to Mr L. Housman’s Pamphlet NLOWS no date (1913)

The pamphlet of Laurence Housman’s to which this refers is ‘The Physical Force Fallacy’. Pamphlet no 37 issued by the National League for Opposing Woman Suffrage. 4-pp – very good

[13145]                                                                                                                  £65.00

 

See # 30

  1. NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES BADGE

circular, enamel. The upper half is red and carries the words ‘National Union Of”, the middle horizontal section is white with ‘Women’s Suffrage’ and the bottom half is green with ‘Societies’. The maker’s name is W.O. Lewis of Howard St, Birmingham. In very good condition – ready to wear

[14879]                                                                                                                £750.00

  1. NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES BADGE

celluloid and tin (?) circular badge in the NUWSS colours of red, white and green. ‘National Union of’ is written around the upper (red) arc with ‘Societies’ around the bottom (green) half – and ‘Women’s Suffrage’ cross central (white) band. Original paper label at back – ‘NUWSS Parliament Chambers 14 Gt Smith St Westminster’ – dates the badge to between 1911 and 1917. In fine

[14884]                                                                                                                SOLD

31A     NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES LARGE, HEAVY

            WOODEN SHIELD

Across the top of the shield a painted banner, in red on white, reads ‘NUWSS North-Eastern’ with the number ’25’ encircled in green on the right-hand side. Underneath is painted the well-known NUWSS ‘tree’ showing the branches of the NUWSS federations, each with a number attached, these relating to the number of societies that comprised each federation.The ’25’ indicates that at this time the North-Eastern Federation was composed of 25 societies. Eighteen federations are shown, suggesting to me that the shield dates from c 1913. ‘Founded 1867’ is painted at the base of the ‘tree’. The shield is 53.5cm  (21″) at its widest and is 49cm (19.5″) high – a substantial object. I wonder if every federation had a similar shield? The NUWSS paper, ‘Common Cause’, 22 March 1918, reveals that when decorating the Queen’s Hall for the ‘Victory’ celebrations, there were 21 federation shields available, ‘with heraldic devices’ –so quite different from this one with the NUWSS ‘tree’ image. A shield certainly unique to the North-Eastern Federation – in good condition.

[14890]                                                                                                                      £4000      

 

31B     NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES

Copper plate, obviously positioned at the entrance to a building, directing visitors to a branch of the NUWSS ‘Law Abiding First Floor’. Most unusual. The NUWSS was always keen to emphasis its ‘Law abiding’ nature to distinguish it from the militant WSPU. Most unusual – I’ve never seen another such item. In good condition.

[14955]                                                                                                            SOLD

 

  1. PANKO

A suffragette card game, first mentioned in ‘Votes for Women’ in December 1909. The advertisement claimed ‘Not only is each picture in itself an interesting memento, but the game produces intense excitement without the slightest taint of bitterness’. The illustrations on the cards are by E.T. Reed, a ‘Punch’ cartoonist and the manufacturer was Messrs Peter Gurney Ltd. The cards in this set are in good condition – held in a rather battered slipcase. But rather unusually, a real bonus, the orignal Rules sheet is present.  All in all an excellent example of the merchandise generated by the suffragette movement.

[14945]                                                                                                    SOLD

  1. PHOTOGRAPH OF MRS EMMELINE PANKHURST

sittting at a desk –  turning three-quarters on to the camera, her costume probably dating from c 1907. Photograph  15cm wide x 20cm  high (6″ x 8″) is mounte. There is some slight white spotting on the surface of the image

[14935]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

5 March 1913.’The Majesty of the Law’ is the caption. Blind Justice stands with the scales in one hand and her sword wrapped round with a cloth labelled ‘Hunger Strike’. A house is in flames in the background. Full-page -very good

[14319]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

13 March 1912, full-page, suffragettes wield hammers in the background as Roman-type matron, bearing a paper labelled ‘Woman’s Suffrage’ comments ‘To think that, after all these years, I should be the first martyr’. the heading is ‘In the House of Her Friends’.

[14322]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

21 January 1912 – full page – ‘The Suffrage Split’. Sir George Askwith (the charismatic industrial conciliator), as ‘Fairy Peacemaker’, has tamed the dragon of the Cotton Strike – and Asquith, wrestling to keep a seat on the Cabinet horse turns to him ‘Now that you’ve charmed yon dragon I shall need ye to stop the strike inside this fractious gee-gee.’

[14323]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

30 Nov 1910, scene is a suffragette demonstration, ‘Votes for Women’ flags flying. Two young street urchins observe and comment.  Caption is ‘Man of the World (lighting up), “Well ‘ave to give it ’em, I expect, Chorlie”‘. Half-page illustration

[14324]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

24 June 1908. ‘The Militant Sex’. Haldane, the secretary of state for war, attired as Napoleon, comments on the serrried ranks of women marching behind him, banners aloft – to the WSPU’s ‘Woman’s Sunday’ rally in Hyde Park and thinks ‘Ah! if only I could get the men to come forward like that!’ A full-page illustration

[14330]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

18 April 1906. ‘A Temporary Entaglement’ – a scene from ‘Vanity Fair’. Sir Henry Campbell Bannerman as Josh Sedley holds the wool as The Suffragette (aka Becky Sharp) winds it into a ball. The allusion is to the news that ‘The Prime Minister has promised to receive a deputation on the subject of Female Suffrage after Easter’. Full-page cartoon by Bernard Partridge

[14333]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

5 October 1927. As a young woman takes her gun from the ghillie an elderly gentleman (the Conservative Party) looks concerned and remarks ‘I hope she’s got enough ‘intuition’ not to let it off in my direction’. The remark is explained: ‘The question of extended suffrage for women [ie for those between 21 and 30] [in whose ‘intuition’ Mr Baldwin reposes so much confidence will be raised in the approaching Conference of the Conservative Party]. Full page

[14334]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

23 May 1928. A gentleman identified as Lord Banbury kneels in a ring (it’s an allusion to the Royal Tournament which was doubtless on at the time) and opens his umbrella to defend himself against the horde of cloche-hatted women who are rushing towards him carrying their flag for the ‘Equal Franchise Bill’. In the debate on the Representation of the People Act on 21 May 1928 Lord Banbury had attempted to move its rejection. Full-page cartoon – good – one corner creased

[14335]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

17 January 1906. ‘The Shrieking Sister’. The Sensible Woman (with her fur stole around her neck) addresses the dishevelled ‘suffragette’ (with a ‘Female Suffrage’ flag tied to her umbrella) – ‘You – help our cause? Why, you’re its worst enemy!’ They are standing outside a hall that advertises ‘Great Liberal Meeting’. A full-page Bernard Partridge cartoon

[14336]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

18 June 1913. ‘Atmosphere of distrust at a garden party owing to rumour that a militant is present’. Love the stylish 1913 clothes – but all – men and women  and children – are all looking over their (literal and proverbial) shoulders. Half-page cartoon

[14341]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

26 March 1913. ‘Burglary Up-To-Date’. Burglar has taken his swag from a safe and now writes ‘Votes for Women’ across the jemmied door. Half-page cartoon – good condition

[14343]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

19 March 1913. At a railway wayside halt the stationmaster asks the signalman to keep an eye on ‘the ole gal on the platform’ while he has his dinner. The signalman doesn’t think she’ll come to any harm but the stationmaster explains ‘I’m not thinkin’ of ‘er ‘ealth. I’m thinkin’ about my station. She might want to burn it down.’ Half-page cartoon – very good

[14344]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

5 March 1913. ‘The child is daughter to the woman’ is the caption. Suffragette mother returns after a strenuous day and is expecting some important correspondence. Her daughter, however, reveals she has torn up the letters to provide a paperchase for her dolls. Mother expostulates: ‘..Haven’t I often told you that letters are sacred things?’ A comment on suffragette attacks on post-boxes. A half-page cartoon – very good

[14345]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

5 February 1913. ‘How Militant Suffragettes Are Made’. A cheeky caddie explains to a visiting golfer that the old green they are passsing gets flooded and ‘so they’ve give it up to the lydies.’ A half-page cartoon – very good

[14347]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

29 January 1913. ‘Rag-Time in the House’ is the caption. Members of the government are enjoying the ‘Suffrage Free & Easy Go As You Please’ dance.  Asquith, with an ‘Anti’ label, is keeping an eye on Lloyd George (wearing a ‘Pro’ armband) jitterbugs with Sir Edward. The sub-text is ‘Sir Edward Grey’s Woman Suffrage Amendment produces some curious partnerships’. Full-page cartoon – very good

[14349]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

23 June 1912. ‘Votes for Men and Women’ is the caption. John Bull is sitting comfortably and turns round as Nurse Asquith enters carrying a baby labelled ‘Franchise Bill’. In answer to JB’s query ‘she’ replies: ‘Well, Sir, it’s certainly not a girl, and I very much doubt if it’s a boy’. The government’s Franchise and Registration bill was given its first Reading on 18 June 1912. Full-page cartoon – very good

[14350]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

27 March 1912. A young suffragette is standing on a table addressing a crowd: ‘I defy anyone to name a field of endeavour in which men do not receive more consideration than women!’ A Voice from the Crowd retorts: ‘What about the bally ballet!’  A half-page cartoon – very good

[14351]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

7 December 1910. ‘Voter’s Vertigo’ is the caption. It is the second general election of 1910 and the voter is all in a tizz..muddling up all the campaign slogans..(e’g. ‘don’t tax the poor man’s dreadnought’ and ‘home rule for suffragettes’). A quarter of a page cartoon – very good

[14352]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. PUNCH CARTOON

24 December 1908. Two male Anti-suffragists, perhaps lounging at the Club, are talking about the suffrage campaign. One says ‘The idea of their wantin’ to be like us!’ while the other agrees ‘Yes, makin’ themselves utterly ridiculous’. Half-page cartoon – very good

[14354]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PURPLE WHITE AND GREEN MARCH The Woman’s Press 1910

Sheet music for this WSPU-inspired marching song. Words and Music by R.H.P, Arranged for piano by W. Vivian Hatch. ‘R.H.P’ was Reginald Henry Pott (1870-1957), hon treasurer of the Men’s League for Women’s Suffrage and a stockbroker. William Vivian Hatch (b c1857) was a sometime ‘music professor’. Both men lived in Kensington. The March begins; ‘Hark! to the Fiife Hark! to the drum double U.S.P.U…’ The March was first heard at the 18 June 1910 WSPU ‘Prison to Citizenship’ procession through London and was then played by bands during the 23 July 1910 procession. The cover carries the WSPU’s purple, white and green colours. 8pp In very good condition – with one nick in the bottom right-hand corner – not affecting any text. Most unusual…I don’t think I have ever seen a copy of this music before.

[14970]                                                                                                                SOLD

  1. SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE

is the caption to this full page George Belcher cartoon, published in the Tatler on 12 August 1908. Two impoverished old women are talking in the street – a unconsciously joky exchange – which is the amusing part  for the audience of the day (I won’t go into the rather laboured humour which, if it has any suffrage relevance, is only to mock woman’s supposed illogicality)- but what is interesting to us is that one of the old dears is standing holding an advertising bill for the magazine, ‘New Age’, on which the roughly sketched in legend reads something like ‘A Suffragette’s reply to Belfort Bax.’. For the book that sparked off the debate in New Age see item ? Bax had published an article ‘Feminism and Female Suffrage’ in the issue for 30 May, to which Millicent Murby had written a reply that appeared in the issue of  6 June, to which Bax had made a riposte in the issue of  8 August. Single page – very good

[12661]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. SPALDING, Frances (ed) The Charleston Magazine: Charleston, Bloomsbury and the Arts Charleston Trust issue 19, Spring/Summer 1999

Includes an article ‘A Rich Network of Associations: Bloomsbury and Women’s Suffrage’, written by me (seems a very long time ago). Also an article on Frank Rutter that touches on his suffrage sympathies – and other interesting articles. A much lamented magazine. Fine – card covers

[12652]                                                                                                                  £12.00

See # 56 – Banner with attached label

  1. SUFFRAGETTE BANNER – ‘VOTES FOR WOMEN IN 1912’

AN AMAZING FIND – a banner bearing the legend ‘Votes for Women in 1912’ The banner was created for the 14 July 1912 demonstration organised by Sylvia Pankhurst in Hyde Park to mark Mrs Pankhurst’s birthday.Still  attached to it is a luggage-type label bearing the information ‘Platform 2′ Votes for Women 1912’. This, however, doesn’t refer to a railway platform but to the Hyde Park Platform 2, chaired by Georgina Brackenbury at which the speakers were Mrs Cameron Swan, Mrs Massy and Miss Amy Hicks. The banner is 193 cm (76 inches) at its widest x  111 cm (44 inches) high, with a machine-stiched pocket running down the right-hand side into whiich a stiffening rod was presumably inserted. Small rings have been hand-sewn to the top and the bottom of this pocket. The left -hand side of the banner is shaped as a sideways ‘V’ – all the better to flutter in the wind. The material is a cream cotton and the lettering is painted on in green.

‘Votes for Women’, 19 July 1912, p 686 gives details of those who worked on the banners for the demonstration. The main work was carried out in the studio in the garden of 2 Phillimore Terrace, Kensington, the home of Mrs Ferguson, mother of Rachel. Particular mention is made of Norah Smyth, who ‘was responsible for 100 flags wiith painted mottoes’ and of Olive Hockin, who took over when Norah was absent. Could either of them have painted this banner?

With another similar, the banner was discovered some years ago by a vintage clothes dealer at the bottom of a bag of garments she had purchased from a house in Old Brompton Road, Chelsea..In nearly 100 years they hadn’t moved far. I wonder who had taken them home from Hyde Park?

The banner is in surprisingly good condition – in that it is intact, no moth holes, the painted lettering is still quite bright. The marks that it does show are consonant with having been carried in a great demonstration – a little muddied  and marked..

[14921]                                                                                                           £8,400.00

  1. SUFFRAGETTE CHINA – ‘ANGEL OF FREEDOM’ DESIGN

Saucer (12.25cm) made by Williamsons of Longton for the WSPU in 1909, initially for use in the refreshment room of the Prince’s Skating Rink Exhibition and then sold in aid of funds. The white china has strikingly clean, straight lines and is rimmed in dark green. Each piece carries the motif, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst, of the ‘angel of freedom’ blowing her trumpet and flying the banner of ‘Freedom. In the background are the intitials ‘WSPU’ set against dark prison bars, surrounded by the thistle, shamrock and rose, and dangling chains. For more information on the WSPU china see my website – http://tinyurl.com/o4whadq. This piece originally belonged to a well-known suffragette. In fine condition

[14750]                                                                                                                £450.00

See # 58

  1. SUFFRAGETTE CHINA – ‘ANGEL OF FREEDOM’ DESIGN

Side plate (17 cm) made by Williamsons of Longton for the WSPU in 1909, initially for use in the refreshment room of the Prince’s Skating Rink Exhibition and then sold in aid of funds. The white china has strikingly clean, straight lines and is rimmed in dark green. Each piece carries the motif, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst, of the ‘angel of freedom’ blowing her trumpet and flying the banner of ‘Freedom. In the background are the intitials ‘WSPU’ set against dark prison bars, surrounded by the thistle, shamrock and rose, and dangling chains. For more information on the WSPU china see my website – http://tinyurl.com/o4whadq. This piece originally belonged to a well-known suffragette. In fine condition

[14756]                                                                                                                £800.00

 

See # 59

  1. SUFFRAGETTE CHINA – ‘ANGEL OF FREEDOM’ DESIGN

Cup, saucer and small plate made by Williamsons of Longton for the WSPU in 1909, initially for use in the refreshment room of the Prince’s Skating Rink Exhibition and then sold in aid of funds. The white china has strikingly clean, straight lines and is rimmed in dark green with a green handle to the cup. Each piece carries the motif, designed by Sylvia Pankhurst, of the ‘angel of freedom’ blowing her trumpet and flying the banner of ‘Freedom. In the background are the intitials ‘WSPU’ set against dark prison bars, surrounded by the thistle, shamrock and rose, and dangling chains. For more information on the WSPU china see my website – http://tinyurl.com/o4whadq. One each of cup, saucer and plate – a trio – together- in very good condition

[14894]                                                                                                             £2,000.00

  1. SYLVIA PANKHURST Humanity The Women’s International Matteotti Committee Oct/Nov 1932

Issue No 1. Sylvia Pankhurst founded the Women’s International Matteottii Committee in 1932 ‘to undertake the humanitarian task, too long delayed, of freeing from intolerable persecution the widow and children of the murdered Italian Member of Parliament, Giacomo Matteotti…Whilst devoting ourselves immediately to this urgent cause, the Committee iis not unmindful of the heart-rending cries of diistress which arise from the political prisoners in the dungeons and the penal islands of Italy.’ Manifestation of Sylvia’s fight against Italian fascism. This may have been the only issue. A copy is held in the British Library but I cannot discover any other institutional holding. Comprises 4 large paes – with punch holes down the left-hand margin, not affecting any text. Very scarce

[14972]                                                                                                      SOLD

 

  1. ‘THE END OF THE HUNGER STRIKE. SHE COULDN’T RESIST THAT! PLASMON OATS’

Advertisement for Plasmon Oats, showing the hunger striker in her cell, a bowl of oats – and its packet – on bench beside her. The vapour is steaming towards her spelling out the message ‘(V)Oats for Women’. The young woman is dressed in a white blouse with purple and green trim and a purple skirt trimmed in green, so the message that she is a suffragette is not missed. A prison guard looks through a barred window into the cell to view the effect of this hot, nourishing dish (round the rim of the bowl is written ‘70% more nourishment than any other oats’.  Plasmon was a proprietory dried milk that was added to various products including oats..hence, Plasmon Oats. The artist was Anita Reed, who was born in Finsbury Park in 1891 and in 1911 (around the time of this item) was still only 20. On the 1911 census she is described as an artist and was living at home in Twickenham with her parents and younger brother. There is not much information available about her..but by 1925, still an artist, she had emigrated to Canada, to where returned at the end of that year after a visit to the Twickenham home.

I think thisversion of the image dates from the 1960s, reproduced on a calendar, from which it has been removed and tben framed – the frame now rather riickety. The poster is 30cm x 18cm and, with the wooden frame, the item measures 33cm x 22 cm. Another example of the adaptability of a suffragette trope. I note that the V & A holds an example of the image which is described as a ‘poster’, although their catalogue doesn’t give dimensions. In good condition – most unusual

[14909]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. THE FIGHTING SEX

This issue of the part-work ‘History of the 20th Century’ includes a section on the suffrage campaign – written by Trevor Lloyd (author of ‘Suffragettes International’). Paper covers – large format

[14074]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. THE MARLBOROUGH THEATRE, Holloway Road, London

Theatre programme for the Boxing Day 1910 performance of ‘The Musical, Mirthful, Spectacular Pantomime DICK WHITTINGTON’ – a most appropriate choice as Dick Whittington is very much a local hero in Holloway. In this production the cook to Alderman Fitzwarren is ‘Eliza, a Suffragette’, played by Dan Crawley (1872-1912), an Irish comedian who had considerable success as a pantomime dame.  Clearly at this time the idea of a ‘suffragette’ was a good fit for a cross-dressing humourous character. Incidentally, the Marlborough Theatre was designed by the renowned Frank Matcham and had opened in 1903. The programme is packed with advertisements for local businesses, including one for the Dimoline Piano Co whose owners were members of the WSPU and regular advertisers in ‘Votes for Women’. In good condition, with decorative cover

[14439]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. ‘THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN’

supplement to ‘The Graphic’, 1885, heralding the supplements to be issued in Nov and Dec 1885 on ‘Parliamentary Elections and Electioneering in the Old Days’. As its advertisement for the series The Graphic has chosen to use George Cruickshank’s ”The Rights of Women; or a view of the hustings with female suffrage, 1853.’ We see on the hustings the two candidates –  ‘The Ladies’ Candidate’- Mr Darling’ and ‘The Gentleman’s Candidate – Mr Screwdriver – the great political economist’. Elegant Mr Darling is surrounded by ladies in bonnets and crinolines – Mr Screwdriver by ill-tempered-looking boors. The audience contains many women accompanied, presumably, by their husbands who are holding aloft a ‘Husband and Wife Voters’ banner. Another banner proclaims the existence of ‘Sweetheart Voters’ and riding in their midst is a knight in armour holding a ‘Vote for the Ladies’ Champion’ pennant. There do not appear to be many supporters of the opposition.

Single sheet 28 cm x 20.5 cm – a little foxed around the edges of the paper but barely afffecting the good, clear image of Crucikshank’s cartoon.

[13690]                                                                                                                £160.00

  1. VOTES FOR WOMEN

commemorative WSPU tissue paper souvenir  – ‘ ‘Official Programme for the Great Demonstration’ in Hyde Park’ on 21 June 1908 – reproducing portraits of the speakers -including Mary Gawthorpe, Annie Kenney, Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline Pankhurst, Adela Pankhurst, and Nellie Kenney. At the centre of the piece is a map of Hyde Park, showing the positions of the 20 platforms for the speakers. Printed by Mrs S. Burgess, Buckingham Street, Strand. The border is of purple violets and green leaves – fitting in with the WSPU’s new colour scheme, first revealed on this occasion. A supremely ephemeral piece- in very good condition – colours bright – slight crease down thc centre where it was once folded. Would look great framed

[14891]                                                                                                                £950.00

Suffrage Ephemera from the Isabel Seymour Collection

Marion Isabella Seymour [known as Isabel Seymour] (1882-1968) was born in Mayfair, London, the eldest child of Charles Read Seymour (1855-1935), a barrister, and Marion Frances Violet Seymour [née Luxford] (1855-1900). In 1891 the Seymour family lived at The Elms, Hartley Wintney, Hampshire. Isabel now had two younger brothers and a sister and the household was attended by a governess, six servants, and a coachman. Another sister was born in 1893. Charles Seymour was a Justice of the Peace and chairman of the parish council.

At the beginning of the 20th century the family moved to a new house, Inholmes Court, Hartley Wintney, designed for them in 1899 by an architect friend, Robert Weir Schulz. The move may have taken place just after the death of Isabel’s mother on 21 October 1900.

In 1902 Charles Seymour remarried. His new wife, Adelaide Bentinck, the daughter of a Hampshire neighbour, was 28 years old, only about eight years older than Isabel. There were to be two more children of this second marriage.

We know nothing of Isabel’s education other than she was fluent in German and that her spelling in English could be a little erratic. She was probably educated at home for a time by a series of governesses – of which one may perhaps have been German? Her slightly younger sister, Elinor, was a pupil at a girls’ boarding school at Southbourne, Hampshire, in 1901 and it may be that Isabel did attend that school, or a similar establishment, for the final years of her education.

There is no trace of Isabel in the 1901 census; it may be that she was abroad.  It is likely that at this stage of her life Isabel was supported by her father but that, later, as his finances grew more precarious (he only left c £600 when he died in 1934), she did have to provide something towards her own living costs. Certainly, by the time Isabel Seymour became involved with the WSPU she was living In London, at an address, 36 Chenies Street Chambers [address sourced from a letter from her in the Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 29 November 1907] that was just the place for a young woman such as her. For these ‘Ladies’ Residential Chambers’, the brainchild of Millicent Fawcett’s sister, Agnes Garrett, were intended for ‘educated working women’, a place where they could have their own room(s) away from the indignities of the boarding house. [I write extensively about the ‘Ladies’ Residential Chambers’ in my Enterprising Women: the Garretts and their circle ­– and there is one rather idiosyncratic article about the establishment on my website – see https://wp.me/p2AEiO-g2.] So Isabel was among others similarly minded, who, although most probably pro-suffrage, were less likely to be sympathisers of the WSPU but, rather, to be in favour of the constitutional methods of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies.

 

Items in Isabel Seymour’s collection suggest that she had joined the WSPU no later than mid-1906, probably earlier. Isabel Seymour was interviewed by Antonia Raeburn for The Militant Suffragettes, a book she had begun working on in 1964, although it was not published until 1973, five years after Isabel Seymour’s death. Raeburn described her as ‘a young friend of the Pethick Lawrences [who] came to work in the office [at Clement’s Inn] when it first opened. The fact that she was friendly with the Pethick Lawrences might suggest that Isabel Seymour had been involved in some kind of ‘mission’ or ‘social’ work. Certainly in 1904, when still living at home in Hampshire, she had been appointed as an assistant visitor to the children of the local Workhouse.

Interviewed by Antonia Raeburn, for her book, The Militant Suffragettes (1973), Isabel Seymour described the early days in Clement’s Inn:

‘It was very happy-go-lucky – envelope addressing, and the almost daily tea party. Mrs Pankhurst used to descend but she wasn’t permanently there. I remember the sort of feeling that she was still a bit of an outsider. But of course Christabel was always at Clement’s Inn. The Pethick Lawrences had put the spare room of their flat at her disposal. They really were like overshadowing guardian angels.’

As a full-time worker for the WSPU Isabel Seymour would have been paid; the general rate seems to have been £2 a week. By 1907 her skill as a suffrage speaker had been recognised and, as well as speaking at London meetings, she went on tours around the country, visiting Scotland on several occasions, where she was always particularly well received. In 1909 she was congratulated on her excellent German when on a WSPU speaking-tour of Germany, which she followed up with a speech in Brussels. In 1910 she took her suffrage tour to Austria and Hungary. In a reported speech in her home village of Winchfield in Hampshire she particularly mentioned ‘the benefits derived by women who had the franchise in New Zealand and Australia and she conclude by appealing to all to think over this question in their minds seriously, and ask themselves whether as women they did not wish to leave the world better than they found it, so that the next generation should have to enter the arena of the labour market handicapped and with little or no protection as was the case now. Many of them had given up ease, money, and even their lives for this great cause, because they saw the great wrongs under which many of their sisters laboured. Their cause was going forward, and truth, justice, liberty, and progress would certainly win.’ [Votes for Women, 14 April 1911 p 462]

From her earliest days with the WSPU Isabel Seymour was ‘Hospitality Secretary’, which involved finding accommodation for country members who came to London to attend meetings and demonstrations. As WSPU militancy increased in 1909 and more and more women were imprisoned and then went on hunger strike, she handed over this post to another WSPU activist and instead became ‘Prisoners’ Secretary’. Thus more onerous task involved dealing with all aspects of WSPU imprisonment – attempts to get bail, the treatment of prisoners once incarcerated, dealing with enquiries from prisoners’ families, keeping track of prisoners and their sentences, informing readers of Votes for Women of the prisoners still held in any one week, and helping organise the ‘release’ demonstrations.

It is not known when she left England but in September 1916 Isabel Seymour was living in Canada, her address being the Okangan Gate Ranch, Enderby, British Columbia. Other than that she was living there with a friend, it is not clear what had brought her to Enderby, a very small town, with a population of 700+ in 1921, However, on 15 September 1916 Isabel Seymour wrote a letter to the Woman’s Dreadnought ( a paper edited by Sylvia Pankhurst) revealing that ‘yesterday I became a voter’. She explained how the British Columbia had ‘decided to have a Referendum on “Women’s Suffrage and Prohibition” – the first Referendum ever held here. There has been but little time to carry propaganda out, and therefore this vote has come as the result of the genuine conviction on men’s part that we have earned our vote I may say that the work the women have done in England since the war had a great effect on the result here. Personally I have been speaking on the platforms of both candidates in our constituency, and they were only pleased to have me. There has been no opposition at all and I never met any man who was going to vote against the suffrage. We have had encouragement and help all the time.

I never thought to get a vote here; when we came it was so far away and no one cared. How is the W.S.F.? If I ever come back to England I shall come and work for you, but now I feel as if my work were starting out here…’

However Isabel Seymour did not remain in Canada but returned to England after the death of the friend with whom she lived. She sailed into Southampton from New York, on 27 December 1920 and by March 1922 was elected a member of the Hampshire County Council, as representative of the St Paul and St Thomas ward in Winchester. She was now living in the town, with her father and step-mother in Bereweeke House, a large Edwardian house standing in spacious grounds. She remained a councillor for many years, serving for some time on the Education Committee, taking a special interest in trying to achieve equality for women head-teachers.

Isabel’s father died in 1934 and it is likely that the Bereweeke household then broke up. Certainly by 1939 Isabel, still a county councillor, was living with Dorothy Pearce, an old friend from Hartley Wintney, at Littlemount, 7 Bassett Row, Southampton. After Dorothy’s death in 1963 Isabel continued to live in the house until her own death in 1968. Emmeline Pethick Lawrence had remained a friend all her life, leaving Isabel Seymour a bequest in her will.

 

The following items all once belonged to Isabel Seymour.

 

  1. GONNE, JOSEPHINE Next!

Large single sheet, printed and published by Francis & Co (stalwart supporters of the suffrage movement)containing the 7 stanzas of this exuberant paean to the resouceful suffragettes – mouthed by the politicians of the day. Josephine Gonne (1867-1917) was the wife of Charles Melvill Gonne, a ‘Member of the Men’s Political Union for Women’s Enfranchisement. The photo of Capt Gonne being escorted by two policemen during the ‘Black Friday’ tumult in Nov 1910 was reproduced as a WSPU postcard.. This lengthy ditty must date from 1909/1910 as there is a mention of the hunger strike. ‘We’ve seen them punched and beaten/On the finngers breasts, and ribs,/ And trodden on by horses,/And shut in noisome cribs,/…etc. Most unusual – I’ve never seen ‘Next!’ before. In good condition

[14873]                                                                                                    SOLD

  1. [1906] SUFFRAGE DECLARATION

A form asking for the recipient to sign the Declaration – ‘I am desirous that women should vote in Parliamentary elections on the same terms as men’ -that was drawn up by Clementina Black in 1906. ‘Ever woman signing must either be or have been engaged in: Work for money; work for a philanthropic, social, or eductional kind; artistic, scientific or literary work. In the event it was signed by 257,000 professional and other women. This is a rare survivor – 1 sheet rather marked

[14855]                                                                                                                £150.00

  1. [1906] WSPU VOTES FOR WOMEN LEAFLETS NO 4 A CAMPAIGN FUND

Leaflet printing a letter sent by the London Central Committee of the WSPU to the editor of ‘The Tribune’, noting that the WSPU were raising a ‘propaganda fund of £1000’ and explaining that ‘our organization consists of women of all classes working shoulder to shoudler to secure the enfranchsement of their sex’. ‘In the Canning town branch alone 150 women are pledged to go to prison if need be, and the same spirit prevails in all the branches.’ This must have been one of the first WSPU appeals for money – because Sylvia Pankhurst has put her name to the letter as hon sec. and, although Emmeline Pethick Lawrence is treasurer, the WSPU office has not yet been opened in Clement’s Inn. In good conditon – a little creasing around the edges

[14861]                                                                                                                £250.00

 

  1. [1907 12 FEBRUARY] WSPU CONVERSAZIONE AT THE ROOMS OF THE SOCIETY OF ARTISTS

8.30 to 11.30. Long 4-page white card with deckle edges, printed in green, the front giving the names of the WSPU Committee, with Edith How Martyn as hon sec, and names of the Reception Committee – who included Viscountess Harberton, Mrs Cobden Unwiin, Mrs Cobden Sanderson, Mrs Pankhurst, Elizabeth Robins, and Mary Neal. Page 2 gives the programme for the evening – with addresses by Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney (‘formerly of the Lancashire Cotton Operators’ Union’). Page 3 gives Announcements of Forthcoming Events – which were to conclude with a Public Meeting on the Sunday evenin in the Caxton Hall. Page 4 is a rhyming alphabet – beginning ‘A stands for Asquith who sought the back door!/B is for Banner he cowered before/C is for Constables, ‘stalwart’ and strong/D Deputation they hustled along/ etc etc. A most unusul and attractive card dating from the early days of the WSPU. In very good condition

[14826]                                                                                                                £500.00

  1. [1908 13 OCTOBER] PHOTOGRAPH OF POLICEMEN IN CLEMENTS INN

A glossy press photoraph of a policeman in uniform with two other men, possibly plain-clothes police, standing in front of Clement’s Inn. The sign for the Fabian Society is clearly shown – and the basement Fabian Society was next door to the basement WSPU office. On the reverse is the date Oct 13th 1908. The police were searching for Christabel and Emmeline Pankhurst after they had urged the public to ‘Rush the House of Commons’.

[14815]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. [1909 OCTOBER] TO THE ELECTORS OF BERMONDSEY FOR THE HONOUR OF ENGLAND

Single printed sheet issued at the time of the 1909 Bermondsey by-election by 9 male supporters of women’s suffrage, including H.N. Brailsford, Laurence Housman and Dr Hector Munro. In view of the treatment that women suffrage prisoners were receiving at the hands of the Liberal government, they appealed to voters ‘to see to it that whatever else may happen at this particular bye-election, the Government candidate is left at the bottom of the pile.’ In fact it was the Labour candidate that took that position, though the Liberal was beaten into second place by the Conservative candidate. In good contion, a little creased and nicked around the edges. Unusual – and very scarce

[14875]                                                                                                                £200.00

 

 

See # 72

 

  1. [1909] WSPU POLITICAL PEEPSHOWS (POLITICAL CARTOONS IN MODEL)

WOMEN’S EXHIBITION AND SALE OF WORK AT THE PRINCE’S SKATING RINK, KNIGHTSBRIDGE, May 13th to 26th (inclusive) 2.30pm to 10pm each day’ 4-ppleaflet, printed in purple, white and green, describing the 12 Political Peepshows – from No 1 Legal Robbery ‘Taxation without Representation is Robbery’ – set in Downing Street where the Right Hon Ll…G..Chancellor of the Exchequer is picking the woman’s pocket. Policeman: Stop, thief. ll…G..Why? It is only a woman.’…to No 12 The Winner This represents the Suffragette yacht, steered by Christabel, ust passing the winning post,, while the Government boat is far in the rear.’ So interesting to see the description of each of these models, which otherwise can seem rather mysterious. In very good  condition – extremely scarce

[14865]                                                                                                                £800.00

  1. [1910 15 JANUARY] DRUMMERS’ UNION

At the Rehearsal Theatre, Maiden Lane, Strand, WC on Saturday January 15 at 7.45 An Entertainment given by the Drummers’ Uniion Proceeds to be given to the WSPU A Fairy Play entitled ‘The Dream Lady; by Netta Syrett. A new Suffrage Play ‘The Reforming of Augustus’ – also a Cockney Dialogue. Those taking part were Miss Rachel Ferguson, Irene and Janet McLeod, Hzel Roberts and Walter Cross  and others. Irene McLeod was 18 at the time and her sister Janet, and Rachel Ferguson (whose entry I wrote for the ODNB) were 17. Single sheet, in good condition except for small tear at bottom edge. Any material related to the Drummers Union is extremely scarce

[14871]                                                                                                                £300.00

  1. [1911 8 DECEMBER] WSPU STEWARD’S PASS TO CHRISTMAS FAIR AND FETE

at the Portman Rooms, Baker Street, London W on Friday, December 8th [1911]. This was the elaborate fair organised by Sylvia Pankhurst, for which the stall holders were dressed in 18th-c costume. Red card, printed in black. Most unusual.

[14819]                                                                                                                £300.00

  1. [1911] WSPU OLD LONDON CRIES SUNG AT THE CHRISTMAS FAIR AND FETE HELD BY THE WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICCAL UNIION AT THE PORTMAN ROOMS, DECEMBER 4TH TO 9TH 1911

8-pp pamphlet printing the ‘Old London Cries to be sung at the Opening Ceremony every day, For this fund-raising fair Sylvia Pankhurst had designed 18th-c costumes for the stall-holders – but I hadn’t realised there was a vocal dimension to the scene. Here are set out the stallholders’ cries, taken from a range of ballads, nursery rhymes and rounds -someone had been busy researching. A wonderful find – in fine condition (slight rusting on the staples) – extremely scarce

[14868]                                                                                                                £800.00

  1. [1913 9 JANUARY] CYCLOSTYLED LETTER FROM FLORA DRUMMOND TO LLOYD GEORGE

writing ‘on behalf of a large number of working women to ask that you will give us an interview before the discussion on Votes for Women takes place in the House of Commons…..etc’ In fair condition – wth nicks around the edges and one slight tear with no loss of text

[14857]                                                                                                                £100.00

  1. [1946 19 MARCH] SUFFRAGETTE FELLOWSHIP AT HOME

The meeting was held at 3 St George’s Court, Gloucester Road, London SW7 (‘By kind permission of Mrs Goulden Bach’). The speaker was Adeline Bourne. Ada Goulden Bach was Emmeline Pankhurst’s sister. Plain white card in fine condition- an unusual survivor

[14828]  

                                                                                                              £150.00

See # 78

 

  1. IN MEMORIAM MISS EMILY WILDING DAVISON

4-pp leaflet issued to give notice of the ‘Memorial Service’ in St George’s Street, Hart Street, Bloomsbury that was the culmination of the procession through the London streets on 14 June 1913. The actual funeral ceremony took place in Morpeth. The leaflet carries on its cover the portrait of EWD in graduate cap and gown and inside, on one page, a short article ‘Why did she stop the King’s Horse?’ [the answer given is ‘..to awake the conscience of the people, a human life would be needed as sacrifice’] and on the other ‘A Petition to the King’ [‘..she offered up her life as a PETITION TO THE KING’]. On the back page are the details of the Memorial Service and the list of hymns to be sung – including ‘Fight the Good Fight’ – 4 verses of which are printed. There is no publisher to the leaflet – ie it does not carry the WSPU imprimatur. I wonder who organised its printing? In most unusually fine conditionthe one

[14813]                                                                                                                £500.00

  1. LADY CONSTANCE LYTTON

cyclostyled notes, perhaps produced by Isabel Seymour as the WSPU’s Prison Secretary, detailing the arrests and punishment meted out on Lady Constance both as herself and as,, in disguise, as Jane Warton. It’s not clear what was the purpose of the document – it may have been intended for newspaper editors

[14850]                                                                                                                £100.00

 

  1. NATIONAL WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION GREETINGS AND GOOD WISHES FOR 1908

Good quality white card, printed in red and black – and headed ‘Votes for Women’. The printed verse is taken from a poem ‘Egypt’ by the Rev J.M. Neale, published in 1858. It was presumably chosen because of its words of exhortation, which include, ‘Go Forward!/Forward, when all seems lost, and the cause looks utterly hopeless;/Forward, when friends fall off, and enemies gather around thee;/ ‘etc In fine condition – extremely rare

[14866]                                                                                                                £300.00

  1. PANKHURST, Christabel Broken Windows WSPU

Leaflet in which Christabel Pankhurst justified the actions taken by the ‘militant suffragists’ on 1 March 1912 – when they took part in a mass window-smashing demonstration. An extremely interesting and important statement. Double-sided leaflet (26cm high x 19cm wide) – in very good condition – with and c a few nicks

[14863]                                                                                                                £150.00

  1. QUESTIONS TO LLOYD GEORGE ASKED BY THE WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION

11 questions concerning his behaviour re introducing a Government measure for Manhood Suffrage in 1913…Among the many other pertinent questions ‘Why do you expect us to accept your personal and unofficial advocacy of Woman Suffrage as a substitute for united and offiicial action on the part of the Government as a whole? In good condition – some creasing. 2-sided leaflet, printed in purple

[14858]                                                                                                    SOLD

  1. ROYAL COURT THEATRE PROGRAMME ‘VOTES FOR WOMEN! A DRAMATC TRACT IN THREE ACTS BY ELIZABETH ROBINS

4-page programme for one of the 8 matinée performances in April and May 1907 of this so-popular play, staged at the Royal Court Theatre, Sloane Square, under the joint management of John Vedrenne and Harley Granville Barker,. The programme includes the cast list, of course, and a notice that ‘At these Matinées, Ladies are earnestl requested to remove Hats, Bonnets, or any kind of head dress. This rule is framed for the benefit of the audience…’   Kate Frye (suffrage diarist) saw the play on 16 April and wrote in her diary ‘I loved the piece – it is quite fine – most cleverly written and the characters are so well drawn. Needless to say the acting was perfection as it generally is at the Court Theatre and the second act – the meeting in Trafalgar Square – ought to draw the whole of London. I was besides myself with excitement over it ‘  This is presumably Isabel Seymour’s own programme, folded into her pocket or handbag and then kept for the rest of her life.In good condition – exteremely scarce

[14864]                                                                                                                £800.00

  1. ‘THE SPEAKERS’ CLASSES UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MISS ROSA LEO

will be resumed on Friday the 26th inst at 4 Clement’s Inn, at 7.45 sharp – short cyclostyled notice – to which Winfred Mayo has added a comment ‘Will you enlare on this & say how necessaryy it is for us to get new speakers etc.’ A glimpse behind the WSPU scenes. 1 sheet – a little creased

[14852]                                                                                                                £100.00

  1. WSPU VOTES FOR WOMEN WHAT CONSERVATIVE PRIME MINISTERS HAVE SAID

Large flyer printed in purple, white and green – with Sylvia Pankhurst’s ‘angel of freedom’ device. The quotes are from Lord Beaconsfield [Disraeli in 1873], the Marquess of Salisbury in  1888 and 1896 and the Right Hon A.J. Balfour 1892. All the comments were in support of women’s enfranchisement, so I assume the leaflet was aimed at Conservative voters. No date – but post-1908. In fair condition – some creasiing and right edgee is chipped with one slight tear into text [with no loss]

[14838]                                                                                                                £100.00

 

Suffrage Postcards – Real Photographic

 

  1. [1909 21 JUNE] REAL PHOTOGRAPHIC POSTCARD OF THE ADVERTISING HOARDING THAT WAS USED TO PUBLICISE ‘WOMAN’S SUNDAY’

The card was photographed and published by F. Kehrhahn & Co, supporters of the WSPU. I’ve seen a photograph of the poster actually on an advertisiing hoarding, but here it is used, I imagine, as a publicity card for the demonstration. The poster shows photographs of the main 20 – recognisable – speakers and gives detaiils of the arrangements for the demonstration. In very good condition though a little faded- unposted – very scarce

[14892]                                                                                                    £140.00 SOLD

  1. BOURNEMOUTH CENTENARY CARNIVAL – SUFFRAGETTES

Bournemouth held a Carnival celebrating 100 years of its existence on July 1910. It was an extravagant affair with numerous ‘grotesque cars’ taking part. Among them was one devoted to that most topical of figures, the suffragette. The ‘Western Daily Press’, 8 July 1910, commented on the ‘bevy of suffragettes with enormously swollen heads’ and here they are, photographed on the day.on a postcard published by Harvey Barton & Son Ltd, Bristol. Fine, unposted

[14747]                                                                                                                  £55.00

  1. LADY CONSTANCE LYTTON

real photographic postcard- issued by the ‘Women’s Social and Political Union’. She is sitting at her desk looking at a book.  Glossy photograph by Lafayette. This card was purchased in the International Suffrage Shop at 15 Adam St, just off the Strand and was sent to France by Helene Putz, who lived at 10a Belsize Parade, Haverstock Hill, London NW. The 1911 census finds her living there, aged 60, and working as a foreign correspondent – dealing with patent medicines. The message, written in French, tells the recipient that Lady Con is another of the important women working ‘pour la franchise’.

[14694]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. MISS GLADICE KEEVIL

Portrait photograph of Gladys Keevil ‘National Women’s Social and Political Union, 4 Clement’s Inn, WC’. The photographer was Lena Connell, who, in an interview in the Women’s Freedom League paper, ‘The Vote’, dated her involvement with the suffrage movement to this commission – photographing Gladice Keevil soon after her release from prison in 1908. Gladice was considered one of the prettiest of the WSPU organisers. You can read about her in my ‘Reference Guide’.  In fine conition – unposted. Unusual

[14918]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. MRS COBDEN SANDERSON WFL

Mrs Cobden Sanderson is shown, head and shoulders, in profile on this most unusual card. The photo is by Max Parker and the caption is: ‘Mrs Cobden Sanderson. Women’s Freedom League’. I would imagine that this is quite an early card -c 1908. Fine – unposted

[14965]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

Full-lenth portrait by F. Kehrhahn of Bexleyheath.- captioned ‘Mrs Pankhurst’ She is wearing a WSPU badge and holds a dangling lorngnette in one hand while the other rests on an open book, is wearing a WSPU badge. Very good – unposted

[14536]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. MRS WOLSTENHOLME ELMY

real photographic postcard of one of the suffrage campaigns most earnest workers and one of the WSPU’s earliest supporters. The photograph was taken in May 1907 when the WSPU-nominated photographer called at her home.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14932]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. THE WOMEN’S GUILD OF EMPIRE Banner Making for the Great Demonstration, April 17th 1926

The Women’s Guild of Empire organized a demonstration at the critical time just before the General Strike to protest against ‘strikes and revolutionary activity in industry’. The march, which brought women (including, wrote Elsie Bowerman to the editor of ‘The Spectator’, ‘wives of working women who have had personal experience of strikes’) from all regions of the country to London, ended with a Mass Meeting in the Albert Hall, with Mrs Flora Drummond in the chair.The photograph shows Mrs D inspecting banners – ‘Efficiencey and Enterprise’ and another, the wording partially hidden, which may say ‘Best within the Empire’ (??) Issued by the Women’s Guild of Empire c 1926. Fine – unposted – unusual

[13686]                                                                                                                  £95.00

  1. THE WOMEN’S GUILD OF EMPIRE Mrs Flora Drummond – Controller-in-Chief

Card published c 1926 by The Women’s Guild of Empire, from its headquarters at 24 Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1.  Fine -unposted –  unusual

[13685]                                                                                                                  £95.00

  1. VOTES FOR WOMEN

placard is planted beside young girl standing on a barrel under the Trafalgar Square lion. A policeman walks in the background. One of a posed photographic Raphael Tuck series. Fair – a little creased – posted

[13663]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. CHRISTABEL PANKHURST

Head and shoulders photographic portrait – wearing a square-necked dress and with her hair up in her characteristic knot. Captioned ‘Miss Christabel Pankhurst. The National Women’s Social and Political Union. 4 Clement’s Inn, WC’. Published by Sandle Bros. Fine – unposted

[14572]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. CHRISTABEL PANKHURST

photographed in the flower-bedecked straw bonnet given to her by Frederick Pethick Lawrence. The bonnet trails long ribbon ties – very romantic. I always thought this choice of bonnet very interesting. Christabel certainly looks very young and pretty in it – but the look in her eyes is pretty steely. Pethick Lawrence selected this image to be used as the frontispiece for Christabel’s posthumous autobiography, ‘Unshackled’. I think the image dates from 1909.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14617]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. COUNTESS RUSSELL

real photographic postcard – headed ‘Votes for Women’ of ‘Countess Russell Member of National Executive Committee Women’s Freedom League’. The card depicts Mollie Russell photographed in a studio setting.. She was the second wife of Frank Russell, 2nd Earl Russell, the elder brother of Bertrand. Mollie was described by George Santyana as ‘a fat, florid Irishwoman, with black curls, friendly manners and emotional opinions: a political agitator and reformer.’ The photograph in no way belies the physical description. She and Russell were divorced in 1915.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14612]                                                                                                                  £50.00

  1. EMMELINE PETHICK LAWRENCE

Captioned ‘Mrs Pethick Lawrence. The National Women’s Social and Political Union, 4 Clements Inn, WC’ – she is wearing a coat with a heavy fur collar and lapels and is standing with her hands in her pockets. Published by Sandle Bros. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. In fine condition – unposted

[14571]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. EMMELINE PETHICK LAWRENCE

The photo is captioned ‘Mrs Pethick Lawrence Joint Editor of ‘Votes for Women’, Honorary Treasurer, National Women’s Social and Political Union. 4 Clement’s Inn.’ The photographer, F. Kehrhahn, has an entry in my ‘Art and Suffrage: a biographical dictionary of suffrage artists’. Fine – unposted

[14574]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. LADY CONSTANCE LYTTON

real photographic postcard- issued by the ‘Women’s Social and Political Union’. She is sitting at her desk looking at a book.  Glossy photograph by Lafayette.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14603]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. MISS ALISON NEILANS WFL

Alison Neilans was an organizer for the Women’s Freedom League. In this photograph she is wearing the WFL’s Holloway badge. She served several terms of imprisonment and during one in 1909 went on hunger strike. Issued by the Women’s Freedom League, this is a very scarce card.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14561]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MISS CHRISTABEL PANKHURST, LLB

Captioned ‘National Union of Women’s Social and Political Union, 4 Clement’s Inn, WC’. She is wearing a brooch that may have been designed by   C.R. Ashbee.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14599]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. MISS CICELY HAMILTON

‘Member of the Executive Committee of the Women’s Freedom League, 1 Robert St, Adelphi, London WC’. The photograph is by Elliot and Fry – published by the London Council of the Women’s Freedom League.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14600]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MISS CICELY HAMILTON

member of the National Executive Committee, WFL. office 18 Buckingham Street, Strand, London. 30 Gordon Street, Glasgow.’ An early card – published by the Women’s Freedom League not long after their break with the WSPU and before they moved into their Robert Street office. Cicely Hamilton faces straight on to the camera.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14633]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MISS ELLEN TERRY

photographed by the Rotary Photograaph Co. Not exactly a ‘suffrage postcard’ but she was, of course, a supporter and this postcard is from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14611]                                                                                                      £30.00 SOLD

  1. MISS MARGUERITE SIDLEY

Photograph by Foulsham and Banfield, headed ‘Votes for Women’ and captioned ‘Women’s Freedom League’ 1 Robert St, Adelphi, London W.C.,’ She wears, I think, the WFL ‘Holloway’ badge at ther throat and, certainly, a WFL flag brooch on her bosom. She had joined the WSPU in London in 1907, working for some time in the London office and then as a peripatetic organizer  before leaving the WSPU to do the same kind of work for the Women’s Freedom League.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – scarce – unposted

[14643]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MISS SARAH BENETT

photographed by Lena Connell. In this studio photograph Sarah Benett is wearing her WFL Holloway brooch; she was for a time the WFL treasurer. She was also a member of the WSPU and of the Tax Resistance League. The card was published by the WFL and is from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.

[14631]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MR AND MRS PETHICK LAWRENCE AND MISS CHRISTABEL PANKHURST GOING TO BOW STREET, OCTOBER 14 1908

Christabel was on trial, charged with inciting crowds to ‘rush’ the House of Commons – but she and the Pethick Lawrences look very cheerful. Published by Sandle Bros for the National Women’s Social and Political Union.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14646]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS AMY SANDERSON

Women’s Freedom League, 1 Robert Street, Adelphi, London WC. She had been a member of the WSPU, and, as such had endured one term of :imprisonment, before helping to found the WFL in 1907. She is, I think, wearing her  WFL Holloway brooch in the photograph. Card, published by WFL, is from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson..Fine – unusual – unposted

[14636]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS AMY SANDERSON

Headed ‘Women’s Freedom League’ and captioned: ‘Offices 18 Buckingham St, Strand, London 30 Gordon St, Glasgow.’ She is sitting in a carved armchair – wearing her WFL ‘Holloway’ brooch.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.. Fine – unposted

[14650]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS BORRMANN WELLS WFL

Headed ‘Votes for Women’ and captioned ‘Women’s Freedom League. Offices: 1 Robert Street, Adelphi, London WC’. Bettina Borrmann Wells was born in Bavaria c 1875 and in 1900 married an Englishman, Clement Wells. She joined the WSPU in 1906- but by 1908 had left to join the WFL. She was imprisoned for 3 weeks in Oct 1908 after demonstrating at Westminster.  The Hodgson Collection contains a (different) postcard from Bettina Borrmann Wells to ‘Miss Hodgson’ asking for help with ‘special work’, which may be the picketing  She later spent much of her life in the US. A striking photo- she’s rather magnificently dressed.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. In fine condition -unusual –  unposted

[14563]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS BORRMANN WELLS WFL

Headed ‘Votes for Women’ and captioned ‘Mrs Borrmann Wells. A  Suffragette at Work in Prison’. Women’s Freedom League. 1 Robert Street, Adelphi, London WC. Here Bettina Borrmann Wells is dressed in prison clothes and is washing the floor of her ‘prison cell’- with bucket and cloth to hand. One in the series of cards produced by the WFL to show their leading members in day-to-day activities. This was probably produced after Mrs Borrmann Wells had been imprisoned in Oct 1908.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. In fine condition – unusual

[14564]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS CHARLOTTE DESPARD

photographed in profile  -seated. A psotcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14580]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. MRS CHARLOTTE DESPARD

studio photograph. She is seated and facing the camera, looking wry. No photographer, publisher or suffrage affiliation given. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14591]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. MRS CHARLOTTE DESPARD

photographed – and the card published – by Mrs Albert Broom. A lovely photograph – Mrs D is sitting, three-quarters on (the National Portrait Gallery holds a copy of this postcard). A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Most unusual. Fine – unposted

[14596]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS DESPARD

photographed by Alice Barker of Kentish Town Road and published by the Women’s Freedom League. A head and shoulders portrait in profile. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14592]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. MRS DESPARD

photographed by M.P. Co (Merchant’s Portrait Co). ‘President, The Women’s Freedom League, 1 Robert Street, Adelphi, London W.C.). She is sitting in an armless chair – with her left arm leaning on a table.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14616]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. MRS DESPARD

head and shoulders portrait by Merchants Portrait Co. She is facing straight at the camera and would appear to be wearing a length of WFL ribbon at her neck. Published by the WFL.   A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14632]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. MRS E. HOW-MARTYN

photographed by M.P.Co (Merchant’s Portrait Co) as ‘Hon. Sec Women’s Freedom League’. It seems to me that for this photograph she wearing the ‘Holloway’ badges issued to erstwhile prisoners by both the WSPU and the WFL.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14609]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS EDITH HOW-MARTYN

Hon Sec Women’s Freedom League, ARCS, BSc – photographic postcard headed ‘Votes for Women’. Photographed by Ridsdale Cleare of Lower Clapton Road. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14594]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS EMMELINE PANKHURST

is standiing on the pavement – under a striped awning – about to enter a cab. This photograph was taken on same occasion as #14619 – and Mrs Pethick Lawrence and Christabel have probably preceded her into the cab. I have the idea that they have just left a suffrage meeting – perhaps at the Queen’s Hall.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14620]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS EMMELINE PANKHURST

no photographer or publisher given. She sites in a high-backed chair wearing a dress with heavily embroidered sleeves and bodice. Her right hand rests on her cheek.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14640]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. MRS MARION HOLMES

headed ‘Votes for Women’ – captioned ‘Women’s Freedom League’ – she is wearing her WFL ‘prisoner’s badge’ and a WFL ‘flag badge’.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.  Very good – unposted – scarce

[14598]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

‘Founder and Hon sec, National Women’s Social and Political Union, 4, Clement’s Inn, Strand, WC’ – photograph of Mrs Pankhurst by Schmidt, Manchester – probably dating from c 1908- certainly after the Women’s Freedom League broke away from the WSPU in the autumn of 1907.  Mrs P may be wearing a circular ‘Votes for Women’-type badge – but it is pale in colour and merges into her embroidered blouse. The card is captioned ‘Votes for Women’. Fine- unusual – unposted

[14575]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

photographed by Lena Connell. An unusual card – it isn’t captioned ‘Votes for Women’ aand makes no mention of the WSPU. Mrs Pankhurst is seated, three-quarters on to the camera, with her hands clasped in front of  her. I’m not sure that I’ve ever seen this card before. It was included in the Postcard Album compiled by Edith, Grace and Florence Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14579]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

photographed by Lena Connell. An unusual card – it isn’t captioned ‘Votes for Women’ aand makes no mention of the WSPU – however  Mrs Pankhurst, who is seated, three-quarters on to the camera, with her hands clasped in front of  her, is wearing what looks like a WSPU badge. I’m not sure that I’ve ever seen this card before. It was included in the Postcard Album compiled by Edith, Grace and Florence Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14589]                                                                                                                £180.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

photograph by Jacolette.  Her ‘Holloway Prison’ brooch is pinned to her artistic blouse. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14595]                                                                                                                  £60.00

  1. MRS PANKHURST

‘National Women’s Social and Political Union, 4, Clement’s Inn, Strand, WC’ – photograph of Mrs Pankhurst by Schmidt, Manchester – probably dating from c 1908- certainly after the Women’s Freedom League broke away from the WSPU in the autumn of 1907.  Mrs P may be wearing a circular ‘Votes for Women’-type badge – but it is pale in colour and merges into her embroidered blouse. The card is captioned ‘Votes for Women’.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson., Fine- unusual – unposted

[14637]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. MRS T BILLINGTON-GREIG WFL

A lovely photographic head and shoulders portrait of her – captioned ‘Mrs T Billington-Greig Hon Organising Sec Women’s Freedom League 1 Robert St, London WC’. The photo is by Brinkley and Son, Glasgow. Fine – unposted – unusual

[14573]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. PHILIP SNOWDEN

photographed by Lena Connell, sold by the Suffrage Shop (‘temporary offices, 31 Bedford St, Strand, WC’). A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14593]                                                                                                      SOLD

  1. REV R.J CAMPBELL

published in Rotary Photographic Series. A rather angelic-looking muscular Christian – and fervent supporter of women’s suffrage. He spoke out against the White Slave Trade.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson.. Fine – unposted

[14652]                                                                                                                  £65.00

  1. WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE Mrs DESPARD AND MRS COBDEN SANDERSON WAITING FOR MR ASQUITH WFL

‘Arrested August 19th, 1909’ They are shown wating outside 10 Downing Street as part of the campaign to picket the Prime Minister in a vain attempt to force him to accept a petition. Fine condition – scarce – unposted

[14567]                                                                                                                £180.00

 

 

 

Suffrage Artists’ Cards

 

  1. MRS POYSER AGAIN

‘I’m not dnyin’ the women are foolish. The Almighty made ’em to match the men.’ Mrs Poyser is a character from ‘Adam Bede’ – a woman with a rough exterior and a heart of gold. Here is is indicating the House of Commons (‘the men’) as she holds up her ‘No Taxation without Representation’ standard. The card was published by the Artists’ Suffrage League and was posted in, I think, June 1909 to Miss Allwood at the Dairy College, Kingston, Derby, and the sender notes ‘Bought this at a Woman’s Suffrage Garden Fete.’ Fair – a little creased – unusual

[14024]                                                                                                                  £85.00

  1. THE CRY OF THE CHILDREN

Postcard by C. Hedley Charlton, printed and published by the Artists’ Suffrage League. For information on C(harlotte) Hedley Charlton see my ‘Art and Suffrage: a biographical dictionary of suffrage artists.A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14655]                                                                                                                £120.00

  1. THE MODERN SHIRLEY

is the caption to a card by Isabel Pocock. She wears a ‘Votes for Women’ sash and holds a banner proclaiming ‘Political Power’. The reference in the caption is, of course, to Charlotte Bronte’s ‘Shirley;. Underneath the image Mr Sympson (a character from ‘Shirley’) in the guise of John Bull says ‘Are you a young lady?’

Shirley (Girl of the Period) ‘I am a thousand times better – I am an honest woman and as such I will be treated.’ The card was published by the Suffrage Atelier c 1909.  A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted – scarce

[14654]                                                                                                                £150.00

 

Suffrage Postcards: Commmercial Comic

 

  1. ARE WE DOWNHEARTED? NO!

Black and white postcard by Donald McGill – suffragette, holding on to her ‘Votes for Women’ banner, is carried into the Police Court by a policeman – her bottom very much to the fore – her umbrella fallen to the ground. Good –  posted in Battersea on, I think, 24 December 1906

[13603]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. BUT SURELY MY GOOD WOMAN DON’T YOU YEARN FOR SOMETHING…

The suffragettes are canvassing on the doorstep.  The artist is Arthur Moreland; the publisher is C.W. Faulkner. Very good – unposted

[13649]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. I PROTEST AGAINST MAN-MADE LAWS

The suffragette is in the dock. Artist is Arthur Moreland; publisher C.W. Faulkner. Very good – unposted

[13648]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. I’M A SUFFERYET

Battered cat…showing that here was no limit to how the idea/word’suffragette’ could be interpreted by commercial postcards artist in the pre-1914 period. Good condition – unposted

[14893]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. NOW MADAM – WILL YOU GO QUIETLY OR SHALL I HAVE TO USE FORCE?

The suffragette is interrupting a meeting. Artist is Arthur Moreland; publisher is C.W. Faulkner. Fair – unposted

[13650]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. ONCE I GET MY LIBERTY, NO MORE WEDDING BELLS FOR ME!

says harrassed dad as his wife walks out the door, leaving him to care for the babies. On the wall is a ‘Votes for Women’ poster. This is an American card sent from Washington to Illinois – but the message carried in the picture is very similar to those of British cards

[13999]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. PETTICOAT GOVERNMENT

presumably the result of enfranchising women – Wife wields poker as her husband crawls out from under the tea table. She says, ‘Come along, come along, come along do, I’ve been waiting here for you’. Good – posted from London to Wincanton on 24 June 1911

[14096]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. SOUTHWOLD EXPRESS

‘A slight engine trouble causes a delay – but is soon remedied’ is the caption. The artist/publisher is Reg Carter – in the ‘Sorrows of Southwold’ series. There are a number of joky cards about the Southwold train. In this one a suffragette sitting in a tree is taking advantage of a breakdown to lob a bomb – shouting ‘Votes for Women’. Very good

[14933]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. THE SIMPLE LIFE

A Wet Day in Camp – a stream runs through the sodden tent – as the suffragette pair sit on fence reading ‘Why we women want votes’. One in a series pub by C.W. Faulkner.Good – a little foxing around the margins not affecting the image. The card is typewritten from Rhodes on 10 Oct 1913 and the jokey message is congratulatng the recipient on impending nuptials. But how odd to take a suffragette card such as this to Rhodes with you. I suppose it’s just possible ‘Rhodes’ could have been a house name – but I’m not convinced. It must have been sent inside an envelope as their is no postmark

[14691]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. THE SUFFRAGETTE Addresses a meeting of Citizens

A card from a Raphael Tuck series. ‘the Suffragette’ – masculinized, wild-eyed, and wearing a boater and tie harangues a few snotty-nosed childrenIn Raphael Tuck ‘The Suffragette’ Good – posted in 1908

[13620]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. THE SUFFRAGETTE’S VISION

Mrs Speaker sits enthroned – attended by a woman bearing the mace. During the years of the suffrage campaign opponents, while appalled at the thought that if women were given the vote there might one day be women members in the House of Commons, felt that the idea of a woman Speaker was just too ridiculous to contemplate. Good  – posted to ‘Miss Horning, Waterloo House, Southchurcch Avenue, Southend-on-Sea’ who my researches reveal as ‘Miss Ethel Horning’, the daughter of a grocer. I think the card was posted in 1910 (by ‘Elsie’, who lived in Enfield) when she would have been c 22 years old.

[14449]                                                                                                      £45.00 SOLD

  1. VALENTINE SERIES:COMPARISONS The Attitude of Politicians towards Women’s Suffrage

1) At Election Time (when the politician willingly accepts a petition) 2) At Westminster (when a policeman holds the suffragette back as she tries to present a petition to an MP). Staged photographic scenes in colour. Very good -uncommon – unposted

[13808]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. VALENTINE SUFFRAGETTE SERIES Gimme a Vote You Cowards

Printed in red and balck on white – policemen have a suffragette flat on the ground – while other comrades demosntrate around. Good – has been posted, but stamp removed

[13605]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. VALENTINE SUFFRAGETTE SERIES Give Us a Vote Ducky! Oh do, There’s a Dear

wheedle three women as they make up to an aging gent. The caption reads ‘Why not try the Good Old Way?’ The sender has added little ink comments of her own (at least I think the sender was a woman). Good. Posted on 17 August 1907.

[13606]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. VALENTINE SUFFRAGETTE SERIES Safe in the Arms of a Policeman

Printed in red and black on white – dishevelled viragos are carried away by red-faced policemen. Good

[13604]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. VALENTINE’S SERIES The Visiting Magistrate (Scene, In Holloway Prison)

Magistrate: ‘What can I do for you? Have you any complaints to make?’ Suffragette: ‘Yes, I have one demand – Votes for Women’. Staged photographic scene in colour. Very good – unposted

[13813]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. VALENTINE’S SERIES:COMPARISONS Comparisons are Odious

1) The male political prisoner (sits in his cell equipped with bookcase, wine and cigar) 2) The female political prisoner (the suffragette sits in her bare cell holding her duster and skilly).Staged photographic scenes in colour. Very good – uncommon – unposted

[13809]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. WHEN WOMEN VOTE: Washing Day

Father is in the kitchen bathing baby, while his wife and her friends sit in the parlour playing cards and eating chocolates – commenting ‘Yes, my old man is a lazy old wretch’. And that’s what will happen when women have the vote. Mitchell and Watkins series. Posted in 1908

[13636]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. ‘WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO, MY PRETTY MAID?’

‘I’m going a-voting Sir,’ she saud. ‘And who shall you vote for, my pretty?’ ‘That Duck in plus fours, kind sir’, she said’. The Flapper Vote. Young lady in short skirt and cloche hat has singled out the best-looking of the candidates as her choice. The artist is Donald McGill. Unposted – but probably dates from 1928 – around the time of the election at which women under 30 could vote for the first time. Very good

[14531]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. THIS IS ‘THE HOUSE’ THAT MAN BUILT

And this is the Minister weary and worn/Who treated the Suffragette with scorn,/Who wanted a Vote, and (a saying to quote),/ Dared him to tread on the tail of the coat/If the bold Suffragette determined to get,/Into ‘THE HOUSE’ that man built.’ The Minister is surrounded by elegant suffragettes – with the House of Commons in the background. A postcard from the Postcard Album compiled by Women’s Freedom League members Edith, Florence and Grace Hodgson. Fine – unposted

[14657]                                                                                                                  £55.00

 

General Non-fiction

 

  1. REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS FROM CONNECTICUT OF THE COLUMBIAN EXHIBITION OF 1893 AT CHICAGO Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co 1898

Fine – many photographs

[5485]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. AHMED, Leila Women and Gender in Islam Yale University Press 1992

Fine in d/w

[10512]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. ALLEN, Jennifer (ed) Lesbian Philosophies and Cultures State University of New York Press 1990

Paper covers – very good

[5164]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. ALLSOPP, Anne The Education and Employment of Girls in Luton, 1874-1924: widening opportunities and lost freedoms Boydell Press/Bedfordshire Historical Record Society 2005

Examines the education of Luton girls and its relationship with employment opportunities. Mint in d/w

[10963]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. ANDREWS, Maggie The Acceptable Face of Feminism: the Women’s Institute as a social movement Lawrence & Wishart 1997

Soft covers – mint

[9533]                                                                                                                      £9.00

  1. Anon The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Shopping Retail Trading Standards Association no date [1935]

‘How to be sure of getting value for money. How to be sure of distinguising good quality from bad. How to be sure of paying the right price.’ Card covers – very good

[13564]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. ANON You And I Cookery Book: an effort to meet a need in the cheapest form Birling Publishing Co no date [1930s?/1940s?]

A spin-off of the ‘You and I’ magazine, published in connected with the YWCA. ‘Over 1000 carefully seleccted household hints and reccipes’. I can’t work out when this was published – it contains several recipes with ‘War-time’ in their titles – but am not sure if this is looking back to WW1 or whether it was published during WW2. But others seem to use a surprising amount of sugar and eggs for cooking in a time of strict rationing. But, whenever, ‘Economy’, was the watchword. Paper covers – front cover present but detached – back cover missing

[13577]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. BARRATT, Alexandra (ed) Women’s Writing in Middle English Longman 1992

In Longmans Annotated Texts series. Soft covers – fine

[11954]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. BASCH, Françoise Relative Creatures: Victorian women in society and the novel Schocken Books 1974

Very good

[13467]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. BEER, Janet Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman: studies in short fiction Palgrave 1997 r/p

Focusses on a wide range of short fiction by these three women writers. Hardovers – fine

[11769]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. BENJAMIN, Marina (ed) Science and Sensibility: gender and scientific enquiry 1780-1945 Basil Blackwell 1994

An interesting collection of essays, Soft covers – mint

[11668]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. BERNAU, Anke Virgins; a cultural history Granta 2007

Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11911]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. BERRY, Mrs Edward And MICHAELIS, Madame (eds) 135 Kindergarten Songs and Games Charles and Dible, no date [1881]

‘These songs are printed to supply a want in English Kindergartens’ – the music is, of course, included – as are movement instructions. Mme Michaelis ran the Croydon Kindergarten. Very good

[9035]                                                                                                                    £48.00

  1. BLAIR, Kirstie Form & Faith in Victorian Poetry & Religion OUP 2012

By assessing the discourses of church architecture and liturgy the author demonstrates that Victorian poets both reflected on and affected ecclesiastical practices – and then focuses on particular poems to show how High Anglican debates over formal worship were dealt with by Dissenting, Broad Church, and Roman Catholic poets and other writers. Features major poets such as the Browning, Tennyson, Hopkins, Rossetti and Hardy – as well as many minor writers. Mint in d/w (pub price £62)

[13693]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. BLAKELEY, Georgina and BRYSON, Valerie (eds) The Impact of Feminism on Political Concepts and Debates Manchester University Press 2007

Soft covers – mint

[11549]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. BLOCH, R. Howard Medieval Misogyny and the Invention of Western Romantic Love University of Chicago Press 1991

Soft covers – fine

[11978]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. BLOOM, Stanley The Launderette: a history Duckworth 1988

Soft covers – very good

[10201]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. BOARD OF EDUCATION Special Reports on Educational Subjects vol 15 HMSO 1905

‘School Training for the Home Duties of Women. part 1 The Teaching of “Domestic Science” in the United States of America’. Exhaustive – 374pp – paper covers – withdrawn from the Women’s Library.

[12182]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. Boucé, Paul-Gabriel (ed) Sexuality in 18th-century Britain Manchester University Press 1982

Includes essays by Roy Porter, Ruth Perry and Pat Rogers – among others. Very good in d/w

[11034]                                                                                                                  £24.00

  1. BROOKE, Christopher The Medieval Idea of Marriage OUP 1989

Fine in fine d/w

[11985]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. BROWN, Marie Sweated Labour: a study of homework Low Pay Unit 1975 (r/p)

Full of real-life stories as well as facts and figures. 26pp – fine in paper covers

[13112]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. BRUMBERG, Joan Jacobs Fasting Girls: the history of anorexia nervosa Vintage 2000

Soft covers – fine

[11925]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. BURMAN, Sandra (ed) Fit Work for Women St Martin’s Press (NY) 1979

Presents a collection of papers which discuss the origins of the domestic ideal and its effects on activities usually undertaken by women. Fine in d/w

[12111]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. BYRNE, Katherine Tuberculosis and the Victorian Literary Imagination CUP 2010

Explores the representations of tuberculosis in 19th-century literature and culture. fears about gender roles, degeneration, national efficiency and sexual transgression all play their part in the portrayal of ‘consumption’, a disease which encompassed a variety of cultural associations. Mint in d/w (pub price £55)

[13430]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. CADBURY, Edward, MATHESON, M. Cecile and SHANN, George Women’s Work and Wages: a phase of life in an industrial city University of Chicago Press 1907

US edition of this study of women’s work in Birmingham. Good – inner hinge a little loose

[8076]                                                                                                                    £50.00

  1. CAIRNES, J.E. Political Essays Macmillan 1873

The Irish economist John Cairnes had long been a friend of Henry Fawcett, both part of the Blackheath circle centring on John Stuart Mill. When Millicent Fawcett (aged 23) published her ‘Political Economy for Beginners’ in 1870 Cairnes took it seriously, reviewed it and wrote to her ‘I have just finished my study of your useful little book and send you by this post my notes upon it. You will find I have some serious controversies with you.’ Three years later, when he published ‘Political Essays’, he sent Millicent a copy – inscribing it ‘MG Fawcett from the author’. A ‘From the Author’ slip has survived the handling of the last 140 years – and Millicent Fawcett has added her delightful bookplate to the front pastedown. However, an inquisitive inspection reveals that not all the pages are cut. Latterly the book was in the library of O.R. McGregor (Professor Lord McGregor of Durris) author of ‘Divorce in England’ which had, for its time, 1957, an excellent bibliography – revealing the author’s wide interest in ‘women’s history’. The front board is detached -. otherwise a good copy – and a very interesting association cop

[11785]                                                                                                                £150.00

  1. CALVERTON, V.F. and SCHMALHAUSEN, S.D. (eds) Sex in Civilsation Macaulay Co (NY) 1929 (reprint)

With an introduction by Havelock Ellis. Contributors include Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Margaret Sanger. Good – 719pp – heavy

[12650]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. CHASE, Ellen Tenant Friends in Old Deptford Williams and Norgate 1929

With an introduction from the work of Octavia Hill. Ellen Chase (1863-1949) was an American who in 1886 came over from Boston to work with Octavia Hill. The book begins with a chapter describing ‘The management of houses on the Octavia Hill plan’ and ends with ‘Notes on house management’ – in between are descriptions of life in the slum ‘courts’ of Deptford. This copy bears the ownership inscription of ‘Elizabeth Sturge 2 Durdham Park Bristol’ (a house that, incidentally, now bears a blue plaque recording her occupancy) – one of Bristol’s pioneers in the field of women’s suffrage and women’s education Very good – scarce

[13804]                                                                                                                  £85.00

  1. CHENEY, Paul, MACKAY, Fiona and McALLISTER, Laura Women, Politics and Constitutional Change: the first years of the National Assembly for Wales University of Wales Press 2007

Soft covers – mint

[11580]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. CLARK, Margaret Homecraft: a guide to the modern home and family Routledge, 3rd ed 1978 (r/p)

The author was senior adviser for Home Economics for Derbyshire. The book was a textbook, suitable for school Home Economics courses. First published in 1966. Soft covers – very good

[10288]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. CLARKE, Norma The Rise and Fall of the Woman of Letters Pimlico 2004

Soft covers – fine

[11882]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. CLARKE, Patricia The Governesses: letters from the colonies 1862-1882 Hutchinson 1985

Fine in fine d/w

[12463]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. COHEN, Monica Professional Domesticity in the Victorian Novel: women, work and home CUP 1998

Offers new readings of narratives by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens, George Eliot, Emily Eden etc to show how domestic work, the most feminine of all activities, gained much of its social credibility by positioning itself in relation to the emergent professions. Soft cover – fine

[12419]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. CONDITIONS: FIVE The Black Women’s Issue 1979

Co-edited by Lorraine Bethel and Barbara Smith. Paper covers – good

[2875]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. CRAIG, Elizabeth Housekeeping Collins 1947

With many photographs. In ‘Elizabeth Craig’s Household Library’ series. Good in torn d/w

[13047]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. CRAWFORD, Elizabeth Enterprising Women: the Garretts and their circle Francis Boutle 2009 (r/p)

Pioneering access to education at all levels for women, including training for the professions, the women of the Garrett circle opened the way for women to gain employment in medicine, teaching, horticulture and interiior design – and were also deeply involved in the campaign for women’s suffrage. Soft covers, large format, over 70 illustrations. Mint – new book

[14966]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. CUNNINGTON, C. Willett Feminine Attitudes in the Nineteenth Century William Heinemann 1935

Good

[2558]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. DAVIS, Natalie Zemon Society and Culture in Early Modern France Polity Press 1998 (r/p)

Soft covers – fine

[11944]                                                                                                                  £14.00

  1. DAVISON, Peter The Fading Smile: poets in Boston from Robert Lowell to Sylvia Plath W.W. Norton 1994

Soft covers – fine

[12031]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. DEAN-JONES, Lesley Ann Women’s Bodies in Classical Greek Science OUP 1996

Soft covers – fine

[11865]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. DEMOOR, Marysa Their Fair Share: women, power and criticism in the ‘Athenaeum’, from Millicent Garrett Fawcett to Katherine Mansfield, 1870-1920 Ashgate 2000

Mint

[11667]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. DINNERSTEIN, Dorothy The Rocking of the Cradle and the Ruling of the World Women’s Press 1987

Soft covers – fine

[11937]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. DINSHAW, Carolyn and WALLACE, David (eds) The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women’s Writing CUP 2003

Soft covers – fine

[11857]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. DON VANN, J. and VANARSDEL, Rosemary T. (eds) Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: an exploration University of Toronto Press 1996

Fine in fine d/w

[9600]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. DOODY, Margaret Anne The True Story of the Novel Fontana 1998

Aims to prove that the novel is an ancient form – with a continuous history of 2000 years. Soft covers – very good

[10562]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. DOYLE, Mark Fighting like the Devil for the sake of God: Protestants, Catholics and the origins of violence in Victorian Belfast Manchester University Press 2009

Soft covers – mint

[11693]                                                                                                                  £13.00

  1. DUBY, Georges Medieval Marriage: two models from 12th-century France John Hopkins University Press 1991 (r/p)

Soft covers – fine

[11984]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. DUBY, Georges Women of the Twelfth Century: vol 1: Eleanor of Aquitaine and Six Others Polity Press 1997

Soft covers – fine

[11860]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. DYHOUSE, Carol Feminism and the Family in England 1880-1939 Basil Blackwell 1989

Soft covers – very good

[11224]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. ELLIS, Mrs Sarah Stickney The Select Works Henry G. Langley (New York) 1844

Includes ‘The Poetry of Life’, ‘Pictures of Private Life’, ‘A Voice From the Vintage, on the force of example addressed to those who think and feel’

Good in original decorative cloth

[11234]                                                                                                                  £48.00

  1. EVERGATES, Theodore (ed) Aristocratic Women in Medieval France University of Pennsylvania Press 1999

Soft covers – very good

[11979]                                                                                                                  £17.00

  1. FINDLAY, J.J. (ed) The Young Wage-Earner and the Problem of His Education: essays and reports Sigwick and Jackson 1918

For ‘His Education’ read also ‘Hers’. The essays include: ‘From Home Life to Industrial Life: with special reference to adolescent girls, by James Shelley, prof of education, University College, Southampton; ‘The Young Factory Girl’ by emily Matthias, superintendent of women employees, the Phoenix Dynamo Manufacturing Co, Bradford and the reports include: ‘Working Girls and Trade Schools (London)’ by Theodora Pugh and ‘The Sons and Daughters of Farming Folk’ by J.J. Findlay. Very good

[8026]                                                                                                                    £25.00

  1. FLESHER, Caroline McCracken The Doctor Dissected: a cultural autopsy of the Burke & Hare murders OUP 2012

Canvasses a wide range of media – from contemporary newspaper accounts and private correspondenc to Japanese comic books and videogames to analyse the afterlife of the Burke and Hare murders and consider its singular place in Scottish history. Mint in d/w (pub price £41.99)

[13434]                                                                                                                  £28.00

 

 

  1. FREVERT, Ute Women in German History: from bourgeois emancipation to sexual liberation Berg 1989

Fine in d/w

[5066]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. FRYE, Susan And ROBERTSON, Karen (Eds) Maids and Mistresses, Cousins and Queens: women’s alliances in early modern England OUP 1999

A collection of essays exploring how early modern women associated with other women in a variety of roles, from alewives to midwives, prostitutes to pleasure seekers, slaves to queens, serving maids to ladies in waiting…’. Fine

[7435]                                                                                                                    £28.00

  1. GLUCK, Sherna Berger and PATAI, Daphne (eds) Women’s Words: the practice of oral history Routledge 1991

Explores the theoretical, methodological, and practical problems that arise when women utilize oral history as a tool of feminist scholarship. Hardback – fine in d/w

[11532]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. GUBAR, Marah Artful Dodgers: reconceiving the golden age of children’s literature OUP 2009

Mint in d/w (pub price £34.99)

[11702]                                                                                                                  £28.00

  1. HACKER, Sally Pleasure, Power & Technology: some tales of gender, engineering and the cooperative workplace Unwin Hyman 1989

Explores attitudes to work and leisure, suggesting ways in which feminist principles can be used to make work life more egalitarian and more humane. Soft covers – very good

[6739]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. HASLETT, Caroline Teach Yourself Household Electricity English Universities Press, 3rd ed 1953

‘It is but a short span in time since electric cookers and fires, vacuum-cleaners and washing-machines were timidly approached novelties, since electricity in the home meant electric light and little else; yet see to-day how far the well-electrified home outstrips these meagre limitations, how commonplace a sight is a well-equipped kitchen’. Good in torn d/w

[14121]                                                                                                        £5.00 SOLD

  1. HASLETT, Caroline (ed) The Electrical Handbook For Women The English Universities Press Ltd, 3rd ed 1939

Packed with information – diagrams and photographs. Very good in chipped d/w

[14122]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. HASTE, Cate Rules of Desire: sex in Britain: World War 1 to the present Pimlico 1992

Soft covers – very good

[10519]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. HAYS, H.R. The Dangerous Sex: they myth of feminine evil Methuen 1966

Good in chipped d/w

[10380]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. HELSINGER, Elizabeth Et Al (eds) The Woman Question: Social Issues, 1837-1883 Manchester University Press 1983

Volume II of ‘The Woman Question: Society and Literature in Britain and America, 1837-1883’. Fine

[12150]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. HENNEY, E. And BYETT, J.D. Modern Home Laundrywork Dent, new, revised ed 1965

‘The most authoritative book of its kind available to teachers, students and housewives.’ Good in chipped d/w

[10225]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. HESSELGRAVE, Ruth Avaline Lady Miller and the Batheaston Literary Circle Yale University Press 1927

An 18th-century Bath literary salon. Lady Miller was the first English woman to describe her travels in Italy. Fine

[3020]                                                                                                                    £55.00

  1. HILDEGARD OF BINGEN Selected Writings Penguin 2001

With introduction and notes by Mark Atherton. Soft covers – fine

[11853]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. HOFFMAN, P.C. They Also Serve: the story of the shop worker Porcupine Press 1949

Soft covers – very good

[13728]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. HOLCOMBE, Lee Wives and Property: reform of the Married Women’s Property Law in 19th century England University of Toronto Press 1983

Paper covers – fine

[7330]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. HOLDSWORTH, Angela Out of the Doll’s House: the story of women in the 20th century BBC 1988 (r/p)

Paper covers – very good

[4809]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. HORSFIELD, Margaret Biting the Dust: the joys of housework Fourth Estate 1997

Mint in d/w

[10183]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. HOUSMAN, Laurence Ploughshare and Pruning-Hook: ten lectures on social subjects Swarthmore Press 1919

A collection of papers, originally given as lectures – including ‘What is Womanly?’ (1911) and ‘Art and Citizenship’ (1910).  Very good in d/w

[1322]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. JAMES, Selma Sex, Race and Class Falling Wall Press 1975

Paper covers – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[13193]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. JAMIESON, Mrs A History of France, from the earliest periods to the beginning of the year 1834 W. Edwards (London) 1834

Fair internally – boards cracked

[2776]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. JEFFREYS, Sheila The Spinster and Her Enemies: feminism and sexuality 1880-1930 Pandora 1985

Soft covers – fine

[12445]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. JOHNSON, Sheila Et Al Working Lives Brighton and Hove Community Resource Centre, no date 1980s

Elderly Brighton working-class residents look back on their lives. Soft covers – 60pp -very good

[10420]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. JOHNSON-ODIM, Cheryl And STROBEL, Margaret (eds) Expanding the Boundaries of Women’s History: essays on women in the third world Indiana University Press 1992

Examines the situation of women in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Soft covers – mint

[6380]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. KAUFFMAN, Linda Discourses of Desire: gender, genre, and epistolary fictions Cornell University Press 1986

Fine in fine d/w

[11881]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. KEDDIE, Nikki And BARON, Beth (eds) Women in Middle Eastern History: shifting boundaries in sex and gender Yale University Press 1991

The first study of gender relations in the Middle East from the earliest Islamic period to the present. Fine in d/w

[10511]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. KENEALY, Arabella Feminism and Sex-Extinction E.P. Dutton & Co (NY) 1920

Anti-feminist eugenicist polemic. US edition is scarce. Very good internally – cloth cover a little bumped and rubbed

[12107]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. KERTZER, David and BARBAGLIO, Marzio (eds) Family Life in the Long Nineteenth Century 1789-1913 Yale University Press 2002

A collection of essays under the headings: Economy and Family Organization: State, Religion, Law and the Family; Demographic Forces; Family Relations. 420pp Heavy. Mint in d/w

[11037]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. KESSLER-HARRIS, Alice Gendering Labor History University of Illinois Press 2007

Soft covers – mint

[11578]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. KIDD, Alan and NICHOLLS, David (eds) Gender, Civic Culture and Consumerism: middle-class identity in Britain 1800-1940 Manchester University Press 1999

Soft covers – very good

[11759]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. KING, Brenda Silk and Empire Manchester University Press

A study of the Anglo-Indian silk trade, challenging the notion that Britain always exploited its empire. Mint in d/w (pub price £55)

[9845]                                                                                                                    £25.00

  1. KING, Jeanette Women and the Word: contemporary women novelists and the Bible Macmillan 2000

Studies of work by, among others, Sara Maitland, Michele Roberts, Alice Walker and Toni Morrison. Fine in fine d/w (pub price £70)

[11912]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. KIRBY, Joan (ed) The Plumpton Letters and Papers CUP for the Royal Historical Society 1996

Letters addressed mainly to Sir William Plumpton (1404-80) and his son, Sir Robert (1453-1525). Good in marked d/w- but has perhaps been exposed to damp at some point

[10954]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. KIRKHAM, Margaret Jane Austen, Feminism and Fiction Harvester 1983

Soft covers – fine

[12415]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. KRAEMER, Ross Shepard Her Share of Blessings: women’s religions among pagans, Jews, and Christians in the Greco-roman world OUP 1993

Soft covers – fine

[11915]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. KRISTEVA, Julia Black Sun: depression and melancholia Columbia University Press 1989

Soft covers – fine

[11923]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. KRISTEVA, Phyllis Tales of Love Columbia University Press 1987 (r/p)

Translated by Leon S. Roudiez. discusses the conflicts and commonalties among the Greek, Christian, Romantic, and contemporary discourses on love, desire, and self. Soft covers – fine

[11917]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. LARSEN, Timothy A People of One Book: the Bible and the Victorians OUP 2011

Case studies of representative figures, from Elizabeth Fry to Florence Nightingale, from C.H. Spurgeon to Grace Aguilar to demonstrate the scripture-saturated culture of 19th-century England. Mint in d/w (pub price £76)

[13407]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. LASDUN, Susan Making Victorians: The Drummond Children’s World 1827-1832 Weidenfeld & Nicolson 1981

CHECK – WRITE BLURB. Fine in fine d/w

[13260]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. LEE, Julia Sun-Joo The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel OUP 2010

Investigates the shaping influence of the American slave narrative on the Victorian novel in the years between the British Abolition Act and the American Emancipation Proclamation – and argues that Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thackeray and Dickens integrated into their works generic elements of the slave narrative. Mint in d/w (pub price £40)

[13436]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. LERNER, Gerda The Creation of Feminist Consciousness: from the middle ages to 1870 OUP 1993

Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11921]                                                                                                                  £13.00

  1. LLEWELYN DAVIES, Margaret (ed) Life As We Have Known it by Co-operative Working Women Virago 1977

First published in 1931- with an introduction by Virginia Woolf.  Soft covers – good

[13729]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. LLEWELYN DAVIES, Margaret (ed) Maternity: letters from working women collected by the Women’s Co-operative Guild Virago 1984 (r/p)

First published in 1915. Soft covers – very good

[12143]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. LOFTIE, W.J. A Plea for Art in the House: with special reference to the economy of collecting works of art, and the importance of taste in education and morals Macmillan 1879 (r/p)

First published in 1876 – around the same time as Rhoda and Agnes Garrett’s book in the same series ‘Art at Home’ – and evincing many of the same touchstone’s of taste in home decoration. Goodish – a little rubbed and bumped

[13338]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. MCCANN, Jean Thomas Howell and the School at Llandaff D. Brown (Cowbridge) 1972

Good – ex-university library

[10608]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. MCCRACKEN, Peggy The Romance of Adultery: queenship and sexual transgression in old French literature University of Pennsylvania Press 1998

Fine in fine d/w

[11976]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. MALMGREEN, Gail Neither Bread nor Roses: utopian feminists and the English working class, 1800-1850 John L. Noyce (Brighton). 1978 (r/p)

A ‘Studies in Labour’ pamphlet – 44pp. Soft covers – very good

[9147]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. MALOS, Ellen (ed) The Politics of Housework Allison & Busby 1980

Fine in d/w

[1819]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. MANNIN, Ethel Practitioners of Love: some aspects of the human phenomenon Hutchinson 1969

A study of ‘Civilised Man’s inordinate capacity for the biological and psychological process called “falling in love”‘. Perhaps Ethel Mannin is ripe for reappraisal. Very good in d/w

[2689]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. MARKS, Lara Metropolitan Maternity maternity and infant welfare services in early 20th century London Rodopi 1996

Soft covers – fine

[11624]                                                                                                                  £22.00

  1. MARTIN, Jane Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England Leicester University Press 1999

Mint (pub price £65)

[10781]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. MASON, Michael The Making of Victorian Sexuality OUP 1994

Fine in d/w

[10599]                                                                                                                  £14.00

  1. MEWS, Hazel Frail Vessels: woman’s role in women’s novels from Fanny Burney to George Eliot Athlone Press 1969

Very good in d/w

[3801]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. MILLER, Robert Researching Life Stories and Family Histories Sage 2000

Covers methods and issues involved in collecting and analysing family histories, and collecting and analysing life histories. (pub. price £24.99)

[11520]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. MOI, Toril Sexual/Textual Politics Methuen 1995

Soft covers – very good

[10542]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. MOLE, Mrs A. And WATERMAN, Miss Alys 20th Century Cookery: how to cook by electricity British Electrical Development Association, revised ed no date (1930s)

‘An indispensable handbook for the Housewife or Cook, giving recipes of 100 dainty dishes which can be prepared without trouble and at small cost.’ Instructions for using electrical equipment – cooker, refrigerator and water heater – and recipes. Card covers – very jazz age – good internally – covers a little rubbed and paper missing from narrow spine

[10213]                                                                                                        £8.00 SOLD

  1. MOORE, Lucy Liberty: the lives and times of six women in revolutionary France HarperPress 2006

Soft covers – uncorrected proof copy

[10520]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. MUMM, Susan (ed) All Saints Sisters of the Poor: an Anglican Sisterhood in the 19th century Boydel Press/Church of England Record Society 2001

A history of the Sisterhood that was founded by Harriet Brownlow Byron in 1850 to work in the slums of Marylebone – but then spread its net much wider. This volume comprises material drawn from the Sisterhood’s archives. V. interesting. Mint

[10964]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. NODDINGS, Nel Women and Evil University of California Press 1989

‘Examines several theological, philosophical, and psychological associations of women with evil in order to propose a counter-definition of evil from the perspective of women’s experience.’ Soft covers – fine

[11913]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. NORWICH HIGH SCHOOL 1875-1950 privately printed, no date [1950]

A GPDST school. Very good internally – green cloth covers sunned – ex-university library

[9612]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. OSBORNE, Honor And MANISTY, Peggy A History of the Royal School for Daughters of Officers of the Army 1864-1965 Hodder & Stoughton 1966

Good – ex-university library

[10609]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PALMER, Beth Women’s Authorship and Editorship in Victorian Culture OUP 2011

Draws on extensive periodical and archival material to bring new perspectives to the study of sensation fiction in the Victorian period. Mint in d/w (pub price £60)

[13432]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. PATTEN, Marguerite The Victory Cookbook Imperial War Museum 1995 (r/p)

‘Over 200 recipes which helped the nation celebrate on that special day and right up to the end of rationing in 1954’. Packed with illustrations. Soft covers – very good

[10328]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. PEACH, Linden Contemporary Irish and Welsh Women’s Fiction: gender, desire and power University of Wales Press 2008

The first comparative study of fiction by late 20th and 21st-century women writers from England, Southern Ireland and Wales. Soft covers – mint

[11572]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. PEDERSEN, Frederik Marriage Disputes in Medieval England Hambledon 2000

The records of the church courts of the province of York, mainly dating from the 14th c, provide a welcome light on private, family life and on individual reactions to it. Hardcovers – fine in fine d/w

[11977]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. PHILLIPS, Margaret Mann Willingly to School: memories of York College for Girls 1919-1924 Highgate Publications 1989

Good in card covers – though ex-library

[13124]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. PICHLER, Pia Talking Young Femininities Palgrave 2009

Explores the spontaneous talk of adolescent British girls from different socio-cultural backgrounds. Hardovers – mint ( pub price £50)

[11525]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. POOVEY, Mary Uneven Developments: the ideological work of gender in mid-Victorian England Virago 1989

Paper covers – fine

[13730]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. PORTER, Elisabeth Peacebuilding: women in international perspective Routledge 2007

Hardcovers – mint

[11567]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. PUCKETT, Kent Bad Form: social mistakes and the nineteenth-century novel OUP 2008

Mint in d/w

[11711]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. RAI, Shirin The Gender Politics of Development: essays in hope and despair Zed Books 2008

A comprehensive assessment of how gender politics has emerged and developed in post-colonial states. Soft covers – mint

[11556]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. RANKE-HEINEMANN, Uta Eunuchs for the Kingdom of Heaven: women, sexuality and the Catholic church Penguin 1990

Soft covers – very good

[11901]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. RAPPOPORT, Jill Giving Women: alliance and exchange in Victorian culture OUP 2012

examines the literary expression and cultural consequences of English women’s giving from the 1820s to the First World War – in the work of Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Elizabeth Gaskell and Christina Rossetti – as well as in literary annuals and political pamphlets. Through giving, women redefined the primary allegiances of teh everyday lives, forged public coalitions, and advanced campaigns for abolition, slum reform, eugenics, and suffrage. Mint in d/w (pub price £45.99)

[13413]                                                                                                                  £32.00

  1. RENDALL, Jane The Origins of Modern Feminism: women in Britain, France and the United States 1780-1860 Macmillan 1985

Soft covers – very good

[9461]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. RICHARDS, S.A Feminist Writers of the Seventeenth Century David Nutt 1914

Sees the work of French feminist writers of the 17th century, particularly of Francois Poulain de la Barre, as the cradle of the movement for the emancipation of women. Good

[2676]                                                                                                                    £28.00

  1. ROBERTS, Alison Hathor Rising: the serpent power in ancient Egypt Northgate 1995

Soft covers – fine

[11866]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. ROBINS, Gay Women in Ancient Egypt British Museum Press 1993

Soft covers – fine

[11867]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. ROWBOTHAM, Sheila Women, Resistance and Revolution Allen Lane 1972

Very good in chipped d/w

[1834]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. SALES, Roger Jane Austen and Representations of Regency England Routledge 1996

Soft covers – mint

[11362]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. SANKOVITCH, Tilde French Women Writers and the Book: myths of access and desire Syracuse University Press 1988

Soft covers – fine

[11883]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. SCARLET WOMEN Scarlet Women Collective August 1978

Newsletter of the Socialist Feminist Current. Issue 8. Very good

[11324]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. SCHWARTZ, Rosalind (ed) Women at Work Institute of Industrial Relations, Uniiversity of California 1987

A collection of research papers addressing the changing role and expertise of women in the workplace. Soft covers – very good

[6876]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. SEAGER, Joni Earth Follies: feminism, politics and the environment Earthscan 1993

Soft covers – fine

[8708]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. SEARLE, Arthur (ed) Barrington Family Letters 1628-1632 Royal Historical Society 1983

In the main letters to Lady Joan Barrington, the focal point of the extended family, the dowager and respected matriarch on a recognisable early 17th-century pattern. Very good

[10955]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. SEIDLER, Victor The Achilles Heel Reader: men, sexual politics and socialism Routledge 1991

Paper covers – mint

[5302]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. SHIRAZI, Faegheh Velvet Jihad: Muslim women’s quiet resistance to Islamic fundamentalism University Press of Florida 2009

Hardcovers – mint in d/w

[11615]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. SIDDLE, David J. (ed) Migration, Mobility and Modernization Liverpool University Press 2000

In series ‘Liverpool Studies in European Population’. Essays include ‘Motives to Move: Reconstructing Individual Migration Histories in early Eighteenth-Century Liverpool’ and ‘Mobility Among Women in Nineteeth-century Dublin’. Soft covers – mint

[11670]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. SLATER, Michael The Great Dickens Scandal Yale University Press 2012

How Dickens sought to cover up his relationship with Ellen Ternan. Mint in d/w (pub price £20)

[13420]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. SONBOL, Amira El Azhary (ed) Women, the Family, and Divorce Laws in Islamic History Syracuse University Press 1996

18 essays covering a wide range of material. Soft covers – fine

[10484]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. SPENDER, Dale Invisible Women: the schooling scandal Women’s Press 1989

Pioneering research on sexism in education.  Paper covers – mint

[1667]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. STAFFORD, H.M. Queenswood: the first sixty years 1894-1954 privately printed 1954

History of the school. Good – ex-college library

[9643]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. STAFFORD, William English feminists and their opponents in the 1790s; unsex’d and proper females Manchester University Press 2002

Fine in fine d/w (pub. price £45)

[11757]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. STANLEY, Liz Et Al (eds) Auto/Biography: Bulletin of the British Sociological Association Study Group on Auto/Biography (1993)

Vol 2, no 1 ‘Research Practices’. Soft covers – fine

[10494]                                                                                                                    £9.00

  1. STARK, Freya East is West Century 1986

Her war-time experiences in Egypt, Palestine and Syria. First published in 1945. Soft covers – very good

[10557]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. STEINER, Wendy The Trouble with Beauty Heinemann 2001

Explores the 20th century’s troubled relationship with beauty. Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11929]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. STENTON, Doris Mary The English Woman in History Allen & Unwin 1957

Good reading copy – ex-library

[8440]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. STEVENS, John Medieval Romance: themes and approaches Hutchinson University Library 1973

Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11945]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. STONE, Dorothy The National: the story of a pioneer college Robert Hale 1976

History of the pioneering domestic economy training college – The National Training College of Domestic Subjects. Fine in d/w

[8231]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. SUTHERLAND, Elizabeth Five Euphemias: women in medieval Scotland 1200-1420 Constable 1999

Two hundred years of Scottish history, through the lives of five women, all related, and all called Euphemia. Fine in d/w

[9329]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. TAYLOR, James Boardroom Scandal: the criminalization of company fraud in 19th-century Britain OUP 2013

Mint in d/w (pub price £60)

[13435]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. TAYLOR, Jane Contributions of Q.Q. Jackson & Walford 5th ed, 1855

The majority of these essays were first published in the ‘Youth’s Magazine’, between 1816 and 1822.  Good in original cloth

[1699]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. THAPAN, Meenakshi (ed) Transnational Migration and the Politics of Identity Sage 2005

Focuses on Asian women’s experience of immigration, and the impact this has on their identity in the context of transnational migration. Soft covers – mint

[10134]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. TODD, Janet Gender, Art and Death Continuum (NY) 1993

Mint in d/w

[3972]                                                                                                                    £14.00

  1. TOMAN, John Kilvert’s World of Wonders; growing up in mid-Victorian England Lutterworth Press 2013

Presents the diarist Francis Kilvert as a typical mid-Victorian, excited by the scientific and tchnological forces ushering in the modern world. Describes the diarist’s upbringing and education to show the origins of his outlook. Soft covers – mint (pub price £25)

[13419]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. TWEEDIE, Jill In the Name of Love Granada 1980

Soft covers – good

[9441]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. TYLECOTE, Mabel The Education of Women at Manchester University 1883 to 1933 Manchester University Press 1941

With a newscutting obituary of Dame Mabel Tylecote laid in. Good – scarce

[13139]                                                                                                                  £40.00

  1. UGRESIC, Dubravka Have A Nice Day: from the Balkan War to the American Dream Cape 1994

A view of American life through the eyes of a famous Croatian writer. Soft covers – fine

[10306]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. VALENZE, Deborah The First Industrial Woman OUP 1995

Examines the underlying assumptions about gender and work that informed the transformation of English society, and in turn, ideas about economic progress. Charts the birth of a new economic order resting on social and sexual hierarchies which remain a part of our contemporary lives. Soft covers – mint

[10786]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. VICINUS, Martha A Widening Sphere: changing roles of Victorian women Methuen 1977

Soft covers – very good

[7646]                                                                                                                    £23.00

  1. WATERS, Kristin (ed) Women and Men Poltical Theorists: enlightened conversations Blackwell 2000

A sourcebook,  including the work of women – such as Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Astell – as well as that of  Locke, Rousseau, Mill etc. Soft covers – mint – large format – 374pp

[6006]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. WILSON, Philip K (ed) Childbirth: Vol 3: Methods and Folklore Garland Publishing 1996

An anthology of key primary sources centring on methods of childbirth -covering ‘Painless Childbirth’ from the 18th century onwards; ”Caesarian Sections’ and ’20th Century Natural Childbirth’ and ‘Oral Traditions and Folklore of Pregnancy and Childbirth’  A single volume from a 5-voume series. Fine – 433pp

[11065]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. WINSTEAD, Karen (ed) Chaste Passions: medieval English virgin martyr legends Cornell University Press 2000

Soft covers – very good

[11983]                                                                                                                    £9.00

  1. WOLPE, Anne-Marie Some Processes in Sexist Education Women’s Research and Resources Centre 1977

Explorations in Feminism series no1977. Soft covers – very good

[6635]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. WOODS, Edgar & Diana Things That Are Not Done: an outspoken commentary on popular habits and a guide to correct conduct Universal Publications, no date (1937)

Good

[10612]                                                                                                                  £12.00

General Biography

 

  1. (ALLEN) John C. Hirsh Hope Emily Allen: medieval scholarship and feminism Pilgrim Books (Oklahoma) 1988

Biography of an American medieval scholar, born in 1883 – who spent time at Newnham. Fine

[11995]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. (AMBERLEY) Bertrand and Patricia Russell (eds) The Amberley Papers: the letters and diaries of Lord and Lady Amberley Hogarth Press 1937

The epitome of radical liberalism in the mid-19th-century. Both died tragically young. Good

[11044]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. (ARNOLD-FOSTER) T.W. Moody and R.A.J. Hawkins (eds) Florence Arnold-Foster’s Irish Journal OUP 1988

She was the niece and adopted daughter of W.E. Foster.  The journals covers the years 1880-1882 when he was chief secretary for Ireland.  Fine in slightly rubbed d/w

[1043]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. (BEALE) Elizabeth Raikes Dorothea Beale of Cheltenham Constable 1908

Good

[11045]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. (BEETON) Kathryn Hughes The Short Life and Long Times of Mrs Beeton Harper 2006

Excellent biography. Soft covers – fine

[10918]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. BELL, Alan (ed and with an introduction by) Sir Leslie Stephen’s ‘Mausoleum Book’ OUP 1977

Intimate autobiography written for Stephen’s immediate family after the death of his wife, Julia, the mother of Vanessa and Virginia. Very good in d/w

[13199]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. (BEWICK) Jenny Uglow Nature’s Engraver: the life of Thomas Bewick Faber 2006

Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11894]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. (BURNEY) Janice Farrar Thaddeus Frances Burney: a literary life St Martin’s Press 2000

Soft covers – very good

[10546]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. CHAPMAN, Barbara Boxing Day Baby QueenSpark Market Books 1994

She was born in Brighton on Boxing Day in 1927. Soft covers – 34pp – very good

[10402]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. (CLIVE) Mary Clive (ed) Caroline Clive: from the diary and family papers of Mrs Archer Clive (1801-1873) Bodley Head

Life among the ‘Landed Gentry’ – beautifully edited by Mary Clive – who had the knack. Good in rubbed d/w

[11101]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. CRAWFORD, Anne et al (eds) Europa Biographical Dictionary of British Women: over 1000 notable women from Britain’s Past Europa 1983

Soft covers – 536pp – fine

[12408]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. (DE STAEL/CONSTANT) Renee Winegarten Germaine de Stael and Benjamin Constant: a dual biography Yale University Press 2008

Hardcovers – fine in fine d/w

[11963]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. (DERBY) Angus Hawkins The Forgotten Prime Minister: the 14th Earl of Derby: Achievement, 1851-1969 OUP 2008

Mint in d/w

[11701]                                                                                                                  £16.00

  1. DUNFORD, Penny A Biographical Dictionary of Women Artists in Europe and America since 1850 Harvester 1990

Fine

[10850]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. (EDEN) Violet Dickinson (Ed) Miss Eden’s Letters Macmillan 1919

Born, a Whig, in 1797. Her letters are full of social detail. In 1835 she went to India with her brother when he became governor-general. Very good

[9339]                                                                                                                    £28.00

  1. (GAUTIER) Joanna Richardson Judith Gautier: a biography Quartet 1986

Biography of French woman of letters – and muse. Soft covers – fine

[12432]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. (GOYA) Julia Blackburn Old Man Goya Jonathan Cape 2002

Follows Goya through the last 35 years of his life. Very good in d/w

[10975]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (HALDANE) Elizabeth Haldane From One Century to Another Alexander Maclehose 1937

She was born in 1862, into an eminent Scottish Liberal family – an interesting autobiography by one who was at the heart of things. Good – cover marked – remains of Boots Library label

[14375]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. (HAMMOND) Mrs John Hays Hammond A Woman’s Part in a Revolution Longmans, Green 1987

The ‘Revolution’ was the Boer War – her husband was imprisoned by the Boers. Good

[6083]                                                                                                                    £30.00

  1. (HARRISON) Amy Greener A Lover of Books: the life and literary papers of Lucy Harrison J.M. Dent 1916

Lucy Harrison (a niece of Mary Howitt) studied at Bedford College, then taught for 20 years at a school in Gower St (Charlotte Mew was a pupil at the school and v. attached to Miss Harrison) and then became headmistress of the Mount School, York. Good – pasted onto the free front end paper is a presentation slip from the editor, Amy Greener, to Mary Cotterell

[11054]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. (HOWARD) Elizabeth Jane Howard Slipstream: a memoir Macmillan 2002

Fine in d/w

[10523]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (HOWE) Valarie Ziegler Diva Julia: the public romance and private agony of Julia Ward Howe Trinity Press International 2003

Hardcover – fine in fine d/w

[11892]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. (JAMESON) Clara Thomas Love and Work Enough: the life of Anna Jameson Macdonald 1967

Good

[12070]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. (JAMESON) G.H. Needler (ed) Letters of Anna Jameson to Ottilie von Goethe OUP 1939

Very good internally – cover marked

[12451]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. (JEBB) Alice Salomon Eglantyne Jebb   Union Internationale de Secours Aux Enfants 1936

Short study in French. Paper covers – 53pp – very good

[13170]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. (LEIGH) Michael and Melissa Bakewell Augusta Leigh: Byron’s half-sister – a biography Chatto & Windus 2000

Hardcovers – fine in fine d/w

[12012]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (LIDDELL) Simon Winchester The Alice Behind Wonderland OUP 2011

‘Using Charles Dodgson’s published writings, private diaries, and of course his photographic portraits, Winchester gently exposes the development of Lewis Carroll and the making of his Alice.’ Mint in d/w

[14962]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. LONGFORD. Elizabeth Eminent Victorian Women The History Press 2008

First published in 1981. This edition with an introduction by Judith Kazantzis. Soft covers – mint

[11729]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. (MACAULAY) Jane Emery Rose Macaulay: a writer’s life John Murray 1991

Soft covers – fine

[11888]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. MARTINDALE, Hilda Some Victorian Portraits and Others Allen & Unwin 1948

Biographical essays of members of her circle – including Adelaide Anderson, factory inspector. Very good in d/w

[6071]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. (MARTYN) Christopher Hodgson (compiler) Carrie: Lincoln’s Lost Heroine privately published 2010

A biographical anthology of works relating to Caroline Eliza Derecourt Martyn, socialist. Soft covers – fine

[14222]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. MAVINGA, Isha McKenzie And PERKINS, Thelma In Search of Mr McKenzie: two sisters’ quest for an unknown father Women’s Press 1991

An intriguing search to find their black father – their mother was white and Jewish. Soft covers – good

[10418]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. (MAYNARD) Catherine B. Firth Constance Louisa Maynard: mistress of Westfield College Allen & Unwin 1949

Very good  – scarce

[11033]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. (MONROE) Fred Lawrence Guiles Norma Jean: the tragedy of Marilyn Monroe Mayflower 1971

Paper covers – good

[2816]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. (MONTGOMERY) Mary Rubio and Elizbeth Waterston (eds) The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery: vol 1 1889-1910 OUP 1985

Fine in very good d/w -424pp – heavy

[12426]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. (MORGAN) Sydney Lady Morgan Passage From My Autobiography Richard Bentley 1859

‘The following pages are the simple records of a transition existence, socially enjoyed, and pelasantly and profitably occupied, during a journey of a few months from Ireland to Italy.’ Good – in original decorative mauve cloth

[13675]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. NEWNHAM COLLEGE REGISTER 1871-1950 privately printed

packed with biographical information on students and staff.   Soft covers – 2 vols – good – although backing on vol 1 is coming unstuck and outermost cover of vol II is missing- internally very good – scarce

[11776]                                                                                                                  £40.00

  1. (NICE) Miranda Seymour The Bugatti Queen: in search of a motor-racing legend Simon & Schuster 2004

Romantic life of Helle Nice, who set land-speed records for Bugatti in the 1930s. Fine in d/w

[10532]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (NIGHTINGALE) Lynn McDonald (ed) Florence Nightingale’s European Travels Wilfrid Laurier Press 2004

Her correspondence, and a few short published articles, from her youthful European travels. She is an excellent observer and reporter. Fine in d/w – 802pp

[11112]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. (ORIGO) Caroline Moorehead Iris Origo: Marchesa of Val d’Orcia John Murray 2000

Hardcovers – fine in fine d/w

[12007]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. PARRY, Melanie (ed) Chambers Biographical Dictionary of Women Chambers 1996

Soft covers – fine – 741pp – heavy

[12421]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. (PASTON) Helen Castor Blood and Roses Faber 2004

A family biography tracing the Pastons’ story across three generations. Mint in mint d/w

[11981]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (PLATH/HUGHES) Diane Middlebrook Her Husband: Hughes and Plath: a marriage Little,Brown 2004

Fine in fine d/w

[12020]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (PUREFOY) G. Eland (ed) Purefoy Letters 1735-1753 Sidgwick & Jackson 1931

The letters of Elizabeth Purefoy (1672-1765), whose husband died in 1704, and her son, Henry Purefoy.  Elizabeth Purefoy was, as her epitaph recorded, ‘a woman of excellent understanding, prudent and frugal’ and her letters are full of domestic detail.  Very good – two volumes

[9338]                                                                                                                    £40.00

  1. (RODWAY) Angela Rodway A London Childhood Virago 1985

First published in 1960, reissued with a new introduction by the author. Growing up in working-class north Islington in the 1920s and 1930s. Soft covers – fine

[14925]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (RUSKIN) Mary Lutyens (ed) Young Mrs Ruskin in Venice: the picture of society and life with John Ruskin 1849-1852 Vanguard Press (NY) 1965

Very good in d/w

[13200]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. (SEEBOHM) Victoria Glendinning A Suppressed Cry: life and death of a Quaker daughter Routledge 1969

The short, sad life of Winnie Seebohm, smothered by her loving family. She enjoyed a month at Newnham in 1885, before returning home and dying. Good in d/w – though ex-library

[4276]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. SICHERMAN, Barbara et al (eds) Notable American Women: The Modern Period Belknap Press of Harvard University Press 1980

Soft covers – 773pp – heavy – very good

[12418]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. (SIMPSON) Morrice McCrae Simpson: the turbulent life of a medical pioneer Birlinn 2011

The discoverer of ‘the blessed chloroform’ and, as such, an important figure in ‘woman’s sphere’. Soft covers – mint

[13433]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. (SLATE/SLAWSON) Tieri Thompson (ed) Dear Girl: the diaries and letters of two working women 1897-1917 The Women’s Press 1987

Letters and diaries of two women whose friendship was played out against the background of the suffrage movement. Paper covers – very good

[13731]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. (SOYER) Ruth Cowen Relish: the extraordinary life of Alexis Soyer, Victorian celebrity chef Weidenfeld 2006

Chef and kitchen designer to the Reform Club and reformer of army catering. Mint in d/w

[9824]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. (ST TERESA OF AVILA) St Teresa of Avila by Herself Penguin Classics 1957 (r/p)

Soft covers – fine

[11950]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. STARK, Freya The Coast of Incense: autobiography 1933-1939 John Murray 1953

Covers her travels in Egypt, the Middle East and South Arabia. Good in chipped d/w

[10564]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. (STEAD) Chris Williams Christina Stead: a life of letters Virago 1989

Soft covers – fine

[11891]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. (STOWE) Joan Hedrick Harriet Beecher Stowe OUP 1994

Soft covers – fine

[11991]                                                                                                                    £9.00

  1. (STUART) Hon. James A. Home (ed) Letters of Lady Louisa Stuart to Miss Louisa Clinton David Douglas (Edinburgh) 1901 & 1903

Two volumes – complete set. The first volume covers the period 1817 to 1825 and the second volume (called ‘Second Series’) that from1826 to 1834. Society observed. Very good – two volumes together

[13335]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. (TENNYSON) James O. Hoge Lady Tennyson’s Journal University Press of Virginia 1981

Fine in d/w

[9675]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. (TREFUSIS/SACKVILLE-WEST) Mitchell Leaska & John Phillips (ed) Violet to Vita: the letters of Violet Trefusis to Vita Sackville-West Mandarin 1989

Paper covers – fine

[4855]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. (TROUBRIDGE) Jaqueline Hope-Nicholson (ed) Life Amongst the Troubridges: journals of a young Victorian 1873-1884 by Laura Troubridge John Murray 1966

Very good in rubbed d/w

[9324]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. (TUCKER) Agnes Giberne A Lady of England: the life and letters of Charlotte Maria Tucker Hodder & Stoughton 1895

The standard biography of a popular children’s and religious writer – who spent the later years of her life as a missionary in India.  Good – though ex-university library

[9599]                                                                                                                    £28.00

  1. (TUDOR) Maria Perry Sisters to the King deutsch 2002

Lives of the sisters of Henry VIII – Queen Margaret of Scotland and Queen Mary of France. Soft covers – fine

[12024]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. WALLER, Maureen Sovereign Ladies: the six reigning queens of England John Murray 2007

Soft covers – mint

[11023]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. (WARWICK) Charlotte Fell-Smith Mary Rich, Countess of Warwick (1625-1678), her family and friends Longmans, Green 1901

Very good

[1754]                                                                                                                    £45.00

  1. (WOLLSTONECRAFT) Janet Todd (ed) The Collected Letters of Mary Wollstonecraft Allen Lane 2003

Mint in d/w

[10787]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. (WORTH) Edith Saunders The Age of Worth: courtier to the Empress Eugenie Longmans 1954

Interesting social history. Good – though ex-Boots library, with label pasted on to front cover.

[4013]                                                                                                                      £5.00

 

General Ephemera

 

 

  1. ABORTION (AMENDMENT) BILL

Motion for second reading of the bill, published in Hansard, HMSO, 25 Feb 1977

[4023]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. AN ACT TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ACTS HMSO 1923

1894 to 1921, with respect to the expenses of the medical attendance of masters and seamen suffering from Venereal Disease. Single-sided sheet

[12562]                                                                                                        £1.00 SOLD

  1. AN ACT TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE STATUTE LAW OF ENGLAND AND IRELAND RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON [6 AUGUST 1861] HMSO

Withdrawn from the collection of the Association of Moral and Social Hygiene. The Act is marked ‘see page 829’ – and on that page the act is concerned with the ‘Rape, Abduction, and Defilement of Women’. 24-pp – good

[12555]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. ASSOCIATE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION 1924

This badge belonged to one of the Hodgson sisters, whose suffrage collection featured in Catalogue 198. The badge is brass and blue enamel with a lion’s head below the initials A.B.E.E. The exhibition was held at Wembley Park from April 1924 to October 1925

[14937]                                                                                                      £10.00 SOLD

  1. ASSOCIATION OF ASSISTANT MISTRESSES Education Policy; with special reference to Secondary Education no date (early 20th c)

4-pp leaflet – good – ex-Board of Education library

[14163]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. ASSOCIATION OF ASSISTANT MISTRESSES IN PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS The Teaching of English 1907

A paper given by Miss C.L. Thomson at the 1907 Annual Meeting of the Association. 16-pp pamphlet – good – ex-Board of Education library

[12706]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. BASTARDY ACT, 1923

Withdrawn from the Women’s Library. 6pp – good

[14989]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. BINFIELD, Clyde Belmont’s Portias: Victorian nonconformists and middle-class education for girls Dr Williams’ Trust 1981

The 35th Friends of Dr Williams’s Library Lecture. Paper covers – 35pp – good – scarce

[9158]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. BOARD OF EDUCATION

Third Report (July 1938) and Fourth Report (Oct 1938) of the Burnham Committee on Scales of Salaries for Teachers in Secondary Schools. Card covers – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Together

[12263]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. BOARD OF EDUCATION Reorganisation of Public Elementary Schools in England and Wales 1937-38 HMSO 1939

‘Statistics for the area of each local education authority showing numer of departments on 31 march 1938 by type of department, number of pupils, aged under 11 and 11 and over respectively, in each type of department together with summaries, by type of area, for England and Wales’. Paper covers – 64pp – good

[12540]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Memorandum of the Articles of Association, and by-laws of the British Medical Association, together with a few other items sent with a letter, dated 17 July 1922, welcoming Dr Gladys Stableforth, Moorfields, Fenham, Northumberland as a member of the BMA.

[8762]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Report of Committee on Industrial Health in Factories BMA 1941

43-pp wartime report – paper covers – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12334]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. CENSUS OF SCOTLAND 1911 VOL II Report of the Twelfth Decennial Census of Scotland HMSO [1913]

Missing front blue paper cover and some pages at end that cover talbels XLVI-LI – but 562pp are present and correct. Withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12385]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. CHARITY ORGANISATION REVIEW Vol X (New Series) July To Dec 1901 Longmans, Green 1902

half-yearly bound volume of the COS’s own magazine. Very good

[9244]                                                                                                                    £28.00

  1. CHARITY ORGANISATION SOCIETY D.R. Sharpe Centralised Registration of Assistance COS 1911

Paper read on 31 May 1911 at the Annual National Conference of Charity Organisation Societies. Paper covers – 14pp pamphlet – good – unusual

[9236]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. CHARITY ORGANISATION SOCIETY H. Holman A Restatement of the First Principles of Charity Organisation Work COS 1912

Paper read on 21 May 1912 at the 21st Annual National Conference of Charity Organisation Societies, Manchester. Paper covers – 24pp – good – unusual

[14100]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. CHARITY ORGANISATION SOCIETY J.W. Pennyman The Cost of Good Work COS 1895

A Paper read at the Cheltenham Charity Organisation Conference. ‘How shall we estimate the cost of good work? To do this we shall have to realise what is meant by good work, and to consider the special needs of our locality.’ A discussion of the financial costs of local charity. COS Occasional Paper No 57. 6-pp – unusual

[14099]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. CHARITY ORGANISATION SOCIETY Miss Pike Friendly Visiting and Personal Service COS 1911

Paper read on 1 June 1911 at the Annual National Conference of Charity Organisation Societies. Paper covers – 11pp – good – a little foxing – unusual

[9238]                                                                                                                    £20.00

  1. CHATTERJEE, GLADYS Subjects Relating to the Royal Commission on Marriage and Divorce Moore and Tomlinson Ltd 1953

A bibliography of works consulted by the Royal Commission – with an introduction by Gladys Chatterjee of Lincoln’s Inn

[14993]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. CHURCH OF ENGLAND MORAL WELFARE COUNCIL The Threshold of Marriage: a practical guide for all who intend to be married in church The Church Assembly 1949

Paper covers – 36pp – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12548]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. CITIZEN HOUSE, CHANDOS BUILDINGS, BATH

First Report on the running of Citizen House, which opened in Sept 1913 as an educational and social centre. The Report, dated March 1915, gives details of the societies, such as the National Union of Women Workers, the Workers Educational Association, Girl Guides – and, since the beginning of the war, the Committee of Women Patrols and the Aid  Coordination Committee. The Wardens were Helen Hope and Mary de Reyes. Packed full of information about the good works being done in Bath. In very good condition – 16pp – card covers

[14978]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. COHEN, Lesley Women’s Organisations in Great Britain 1985/86 Women’s National Commission 1985

Soft covers – 84-pp – very good

[12534]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. COMMISSION OF ENQUIRY INTO INDUSTRIAL UNREST: Report of the Commission for Wales HMSO 1917

50pp – good reading copy – bound into later card covers – ex-Board of Education Library

[13215]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACT HMSO

1) Criminal Justice Adminstration Act, 1914 – ‘An Act to diminish the number of cases committed to prison, to amend the Law with respect to the treatment and punishment of young offenders, and otherwise to improve the administration of criminal justice’.- 36pp – good; 2) Criminal Justice Act, 1925 – ‘An Act to amend the law with respect to the administration of criminal justice in England, and otherwise to amend the criminal law’ – 44pp – good; 3) Criminal Justice Act, 1948 – ‘An Act to abolish penal servitude, hard labour, prison divisions and sentence of whipping ‘etc – 110pp – good. Together

[12557]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT ACT, 1922

Withdrawn from the Women’s Library. 6pp – good

[14990]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. DAILY MIRROR 2 October 1940

The headline is ‘First Women to win GM’. – describing the actions that had led to three A.R.P. women being awarded the George Medal for Valour. Very good

[10719]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. DAVIES, Dilys The Problem of Girls’ Education in Wales Association for Promoting the Education of Girls in Wales 1887

‘An Address delivered before the Welsh National Society of Liverpool, on January 13th 1887’. ‘The need of education is never felt more keenly than by the woman whose faculiteis have been undeveloped by wise guidance in childhood, and who is thrown unexpectedly on her own resources to fend for herself, and earn an honest living’. Very sensible. 14-pp pamphlet – very good – but with foxing

[14524]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE ON THE TRAINING APPOINTMENT AND PAYMENT OF PROPBATION OFFICERS Report of the Departmental Committee on the Training, Appointment and Payment of Probation Officers HMSO 1922

Paper covers – 32pp – fair – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12292]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. DISINHERITANCE The Remedies of Lord Astor’s Bill

an article reprinted from ‘The Observer’, Sept 6, 1928. ‘Lord Astor introduced a Bill in the House of Lords last session to modify, to a limited extent, the right of arbitrary disinheritance possessed by spouses and parents in England and Wales and occasionally exercised.’ Double-sided sheet – good

[12561]                                                                                                                    £1.00

  1. ELIZA COOK’S JOURNAL VOLS 1-3

Runs from issue 1, 5 May 1849 to issue 156, 24 April 1852. Very good condition – half leather and marbled boards. Each vol

[8594]                                                                                                                    £38.00

  1. EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE OF THE INCORPORATED ASSOCIATION OF HEAD MISTRESSES OF PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS Annual Report for 1930 HMSO 1931

Withdrawn from the Women’s Library – 16pp – good

[14995]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. EQUAL PAY CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE AND STATUS OF WOMEN COMMITTEE Equal Pay: a reply to the chancellor of the Exchequer 1947

Double-sided leaflet – creased and nicked

[12273]                                                                                                                    £1.00

 

  1. EQUAL PAY FOR EQUAL WORK Equal Pay Campaign Committee 1944

‘The question of Equal Pay for Equal Work will shortly come up for discussion in Parliament…’Small 4pp leaflet

[14999]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. EQUAL RIGHTS FOR WOMEN International Women’s Year, 1975 UN Office of Public Information 1974

Details of the UN’s plans for their work on equal rights in 1975. Good – 16pp – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[14991]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. EVERYWOMAN

founded in 1985, aa news and current affairs magazine aimed at ‘real women’. Issues:

1991 July/Aug

1992 Oct, Nov, Dec/Jan 1993;1993, Feb, April, March, May, June, July, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov Dec/Jan 1994; 1994, Feb, March, April, May, June, July, Aug, Sept,  Oct, Nov, Dec/Jan 1995;1995 Feb, March, April, May, June, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec/Jan 1996;1996 May

In good condition. Each

[14923]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. FAREWELL FROM THE WOMEN’S BRANCH OF THE BOMBAY PRESIDENCY WAR AND RELIEF FUND 1914 1918

Small metal Vesta case with a map of India shown in relief..to hold a small box of matches. During World War I, Lord Willingdon, the governor of Bombay, created the India War & Relief Fund (Bombay Branch) two which all the native and princely states neighbouring the Bombay Presidency contributed, along with the people of the Bombay Presidency. Lady Willingdon was president of the Women’s Branch. it is thought these little vesta cases were given to soldiers leaving India on their way back to Britain. In good condition – unusual

[14979]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. FEDERATION OF SOCIETIES OF TEACHERS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Two of the Federation’s annual reports. First Annual Report (Oct 1935-Sept 1936), 6pp; Fourth Annual Report (October 1938-Dec 1939), 12pp. Both soft covers, both very good. Together

[13329]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. GRUBBE, JULIA HARRIET

A collection of photograph and over 20 letters relating to Julia Harriet Grubbe (1845-1907), the daughter of John Eustace Grubbe, magistrate, parliamentary agent and sometime mayor of Southwold. A very large page carries 11 photographs of Julia, covering the whole of her life. In the 1880s/90s, from which period most of the letters (all written to her) date, she lived with her parents and four unmarried siblings in Park Lane, Southwold. A study of the letters gives an insight into the concerns of a woman of her class and time. In very good condition

[14212]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. GUARDIANSHIP OF INFANTS ACT, 1925

Withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Good – 12pp

[14988]                                                                                                        £5.00 SOLD

  1. HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS BOLTON

Page from ‘The Buiilding News’ (18 March 1892) showing the new building for the school, at Park Road, Bolton, opened by Millicent Fawcett on 8 May 1891. The building, now, I think, demolished was in an ‘olde Englishe’ style, with half-timbering  and an oriel window to the assembly hall. The page includes plans for the Ground and First floors, showing the disposition of classrooms, wcs etc. Very good

[14898]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. HILL, Charles H. E. Memorandum on the National Service Acts, 1939-41 and other emergency legislation prepared for the War Resisters’ International War Resisters’ International 1942

16-pp pamphlet – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12367]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. HMSO Factories (No 2) Bill HMSO 1926

Concerned with working conditions. 102pp – lacking paper covers – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12300]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. HMSO National Advisory Committee on the Employment of Older Men and Women HMSO

The First Report, Oct 1953 and Second Report, Dec 1955. Paper covers – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Together

[12277]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. HMSO A Study of the Factors which have operated in the past and those which are operating now to determine the distribution of women in industry 1930

Paper covers – very good – 33pp

[3638]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. ILLEGITIMATE CHILDREN (SCOTLAND) ACT, 1930 HMSO 1930

‘An Act to amend the alw as to the duration and recovery of aliment for, and the custody of, illegitimate children in Scotland, and for other purposes connected therewith.’ 4-pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library.

[12565]                                                                                                                    £1.00

  1. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

March 8th 1959. Single sheet advertising ‘Celebration at Holborn Hall’. Good

[2320]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. JOSEPHINE BUTLER

photograph of her- head and shoulders – by Elliott and Fry. Has been someone’s pin-up – pin mark at top of card – well clear of photograph. Fair

[11205]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. KLEIN, Viola Employing Married Women Institute of Personnel Management 1961

Paper covers – 52pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[14996]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. LEWISHAM WOMEN’S INSTITUTE

Programme of classes for 1957-58 – 12pp

[7225]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. McMILLAN, Margaret The Future of Our Young People Co-operative Union 1911

Paper covers – 12pp – good – ex-Board of Education library

[12743]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. MATERNAL MORTALITY Report of Meeting held at Central Hall, Westminster, on October 30, 1928 Maternal Mortality Committee 1928

Held at a time when there was still one maternal death per 250 births. Withdrawn from the Women’s Library. 30 pp – good, though front cover detached and torn

[14987]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND NATIONAL SERVICE Time Rates of Wages and Hours of Labour HMSO 1952

Covers every type of employment for coal mining to cinema usherette. Paper covers – 248pp

[12298]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. MINISTRY OF RECONSTRUCTION Report of the Women’s Advisory Committee on the Domestic Service Problem together with reports by sub-committees on training, Machinery of distribution, organisation and conditions HMSO 1919

Among those involved in the committee were Margaret Tuke, Winifred Mercier, Clementina Black, Katherine Furse, Mrs C.S. Peel, and the Marchioness of Londonderry. The recommendations cover training, contract of service, scale of wages, employment exchanges and registry offices.  Probably missing blue paper covers, otherwise very good -36pp

[14994]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. MRS SARAH BURGESS – PRINTER Souvenir and History of Opening of Parliament by the King and Queen Wed Feb 14th 1912

Mrs Burgess was the printer of souvenir tissue napkins, sold from her shop just off the Strand to street hawkers and then bought from them by those  viewing the great events of the day.In this case the 1912 opening of Parliament. For more about Sarah Burgess see a post on my website – https://wp.me/p2AEiO-1vs. This tissue is in very good condition

[14980]                                                                                                      £30.00 SOLD

  1. MRS SARAH BURGESS – PRINTER Souvenir and Programme of the Opening of the Festival of Empire by their Majesties the King and Queen at the Crystal Palace, May 12th 1911.

Mrs Burgess was the printer of souvenir tissue napkins, sold from her shop (which at this time was in Artillery Lane, Bishopsgate) to street hawkers and then bought from them by those  viewing the great events of the day.In this case the 1911 Festival of Empire – with portraits of King George V, Queen Alexandra and, I assume,the young Prince Edward. For more about Sarah Burgess see a post on my website – https://wp.me/p2AEiO-1vs. This tissue has a tear in the bottom right-hand corner, which doesn’t affect text but does split one of the numerous union flags that frame the piece

[14985]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. MRS SARAH BURGESS – PRINTER Souvenir in Commemoration of Queen Alexandra’s Inspection of the Great Boy Scout Rally on the Horse Guards’ Parade, Saturday June 13th 1914

Mrs Burgess was the printer of souvenir tissue napkins, sold from her shop just off the Strand to street hawkers and then bought from them by those  viewing the great events of the day.In this case a 1914 Boy Scout Rally. For more about Sarah Burgess see a post on my website – https://wp.me/p2AEiO-1vs. In good condition – one nick on the right-hand margin.

[14981]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. MRS SARAH BURGESS – PRINTER Souvenir in Commemoration of the Anniversary of Armistice Day and President Poincare Visit to London, 11 November 1919

Mrs Burgess was the printer of souvenir tissue napkins, sold from her shop just off the Strand to street hawkers and then bought from them by those  viewing the great events of the day.In this case the first anniversary of the Armistice – with full details of Poincare’s visit and of the Armistice Day procession to the Cenotaph and then to Westminster Abbey. For more about Sarah Burgess see a post on my website – https://wp.me/p2AEiO-1vs. This tissue is in good condition.

[14982]                                                                                                      £30.00 SOLD

  1. MRS SARAH BURGESS – PRINTER Souvenir in Commemoration of the Inspection of the Indian Troops by their Emperor King at Buckingham Palace, 2nd August 1919

Mrs Burgess was the printer of souvenir tissue napkins, sold from her shop just off the Strand to street hawkers and then bought from them by those  viewing the great events of the day.In this case the 1919 Inspection of Indian troops – with portraits of the King and Queen and details of the Indian troops’ movements through London. For more about Sarah Burgess see a post on my website – https://wp.me/p2AEiO-1vs. This tissue is in very good condition.

[14984]                                                                                                                  £30.00

  1. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF GIRLS’ CLUBS Clubs and Club Making University of London Press 1943

A history – and then 13 chapters on how to run a club. Soft covers – 104pp – good – ex-Board of Education library

[12747]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. NATIONAL FEDERATION OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S CLUBS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND The Changing Pattern: report on the training of older woman NFBPWC 1966

Paper covers – 24pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12296]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION BOOK

for Ethel Leach, a member of the Amalgamated Association of Card, Blowing and Ring room Operatives c1912. Ethel Leach lwas born in 1898 and lived at

2 Alder Street, Bolton, with her parents (her father was a basketmaker) and her brother and sister. When the 1911 census was taken she was 13 and still at school – but by the time this Contribution Book was issued she was a ‘Cardroom Operative;. The 8 printed pages of the book detail the Table of Weeklly Contributions, Contributions Paid, and the Benefits that will accrue.- as well as much detail about the operation of the National Health Insurance at that time. An unusual item. Card covers – very good

[14975]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE The National Health Service (Service Committees and Tribunal) Regulations 1948 HMSO 1948

30-pp – good – withdrawn from the collection of the Association for Moral and Social Hygiene – good – with some marginal pencilled emphases.

[12551]                                                                                                                    £1.00

  1. NATIONAL UNION OF FAMILY ASSOCIATIONS World Congress for Family and Population 1947

The Congress was held in Paris in June 1947. Paper covers – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12532]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S TEACHERS How Equal Pay would Help Industry and Decrease Unemployment   NUWT 1930s?

Single page leaflet, published by the National Union of Women teachers- fine

[10735]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. NOBLE WOMEN; Windows in the Lady Chapel Liverpool Cathderal Liverpool Cathedral (no date)

Booklet describing the stained glas window, designed by James Hogan in 1921 and painted by A.A. Burcombe of Whitefriars Studios. The ‘noble women’ included those with Liverpool connections, such as Jemima Clough, Josephine Butler and Agnes Jones, as well as ones, such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti, who did not. 16-pp – card covers – very good

[12237]                                                                                                        £4.00 SOLD

  1. NORWEGIAN JOINT COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL POLICY The Status of Women in Norway Today 1953

Paper covers -67 pp – with photographs – with drawn from the Women’s Library

[13173]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. PAOLO AND FRANCESCA

programme for the production of ‘Paola and Francesca’ by Stephen Phillips staged by George Alexander at the St James’s Theatre in March 1902. The cast included Elizabeth Robins, Henry Ainley, Lilian Braithwaite and Evelyn Millard. The programme conmprises, as well as the cast list, a long history of the story of Paola and Francesca, notes on the costumes, the scenery, and the music. Good condition

[14423]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. POST OFFICE HMSO

1) Decision of Industrial Court July 1927: Manipulative Grades – Post Office. In the course of the claims and counter claims sets out all the grades and pay of Post Office workers. Paper covers, 212pp ; 2) Report of the Committee on the Inland Telegraph Service 1927, pub 1928. Paper covers – 28pp. Two items – good – together

[12541]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. PROBATION OF OFFENDERS ACT 1907 HMSO 1907

Paper covers – 8-pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12554]                                                                                                                    £1.00

  1. REPORT OF A DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE ON THE PREVALENCE OF VENEREAL DISEASE AMONG THE BRITISH TROOPS IN INDIA HMSO 1897

33-pp foolscap Report – together with – ‘A Rough Record 1858-1935 on the work of the Association for Moral and Social Hygiene, in connection with the British Army in India’ – 8-pp foolscap report. In good condition – withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Together

[12353]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. REPORT OF THE STREET OFFENCES COMMITTEE HMSO 1928

The Committee included Margery Fry. Good – 50pp – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[14380]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. REVIEW OF REVIEWS

edited by W.T. Stead. the first volume, January-June 1890. As Stead spotted, here was a gap in the market, enabling the interested observer to keep a finger on the pulse of the world. With v useful indexes to articles in current periodicals. Very good

[3887]                                                                                                                    £25.00

  1. RICH, Adena Women Under Our Immigration and Naturalization Laws 1949

The post-war US position. Reprinted from ‘The Social Science Review’ – self covers – fair – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12382]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. SACKVILLE-WEST, Vita Knole National Trust 1952

National Trust guide to Knole, with a catalogue of pictures and biographical notes of painters by Robin Fedden. Includes 8 b & w photographs. Soft covers – fine

[5470]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. SCARLET WOMEN

Newsletter of the Socialist Feminist Current – issue for April 1978

[8189]                                                                                                                      £1.00

  1. SCARLET WOMEN

Newsletter of the Socialist Feminist Current. Issue for August 1978

[8191]                                                                                                                      £1.00

  1. SECURITY (MR PROFUMO’S RESIGNATION) Hansard 1963

Debate in the House of Commons on Profumo’s resignation, 17 June 1963. Harold Wilson: ‘..There is something utterly nauseating about a system of society which pays a harlot 25 times as much as it pays its prime minister….’ Another of Britain’s great moments. Poor condition, partially disbound..but it’s all there.

[15003]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. SENIOR, Mrs Nassau Pauper Schools HMSO 1875

‘Copy ”of a Letter addressed to the President of the Local Government Board by Mrs Nassau Senior, lately an Inspector of the Board, being a reply to the observation of Mr Tufnell, also a former inspector upon her report on pauper schools’. This was a follow-up to Mrs Senior’s 1874 report.

24pp – large format – disbound.

[10457]                                                                                                                  £28.00

  1. SOUTHWARK HOUSING ASSOCIATION LTD Fifth Report Southwark Housing Association May 1937

Paper covers – 20-pp – with a map, a photograph and lots of names of subscribers. Very good

[12247]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. SPARE RIB

Founded in 1972 and running until 1992. I have the following issues for sale:     1981 112, 113 ; 1982 114 to 125 ;1983 126, 128, 131, 133, 135- 137 ; 1984 138 to 149; 1985 150-157;

1986 167;1 987 177  In good condition – each

[14885]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE OF WORKING WOMEN’S ORGANISATIONS Working Women Discuss – Population, Equal Pay, Domestic Work WWO no date (1946)

Paper covers – 24pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[14997]                                                                                                        £2.00 SOLD

  1. STUDY GROUP ON DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN Towards Equality: Women and Social Security Labour Party 1969

Interim report of a joint National Executive Committee: Parliamentary Labour Party Study Group on Discrimination Against Women, which was begun in 1967. Paper covers – very good

[1991]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. SUMMARY JURISDICTION (MARRIED WOMEN) ACT, 1895 HMSO

An Act to amend the Law relating to the Summary Jurisdiction of Magistrates in reference to Married Women.  Paper covers – 8pp – good. Together with ‘ Summary Jurisdiction (Separation and Mainenance) Bill to Amend the Married Women (Maintenance) Acts 1895 and 1920, and section 5 of the Licensing Act, 1905. Paper covers – 6pp – good. And An Act to amend the Law relating to Separation and Maintenance Orders, 1925 – paper covers – 4pp. All withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Together

[12563]                                                                                                        £2.00 SOLD

  1. TEACHERS’ GUILD Helps to Self-Help for Teachers by Assurance and Investment through the Teachers’ Guild 1901

Paper covers – 28pp – good – ex-Board of Education Library

[13221]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. TEACHERS’ GUILD OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND Collection of Annual Reports

Reports for 1896-1897; 1897; 1899; 1900; 1901-1902; 1904-1905; 1905-1906; 1906; 1907-1908; 1908; 1909-10; 1910; 1911-12. The Guild represented both male and female teachers. With much detail of local branches. Each Report c 90pp, in original paper covers (the occasional cover present, but detached) – all in good condition. Together – 13 items

[13217]                                                                                                                  £80.00

  1. TEACHERS’ GUILD OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND List of Members Alphabetically Arranged 1913

Names and addresses – very useful. Women teachers appear to be in the majority. Soft covers – good – ex-Board of Education Library

[13218]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. THE ACLAND CHRONICLE April 1903

The second number of the ‘Acland Chronicle’ recording the work of the Acland Club for boys and girls that was associated with the Women’s University Settlement. Good in original wrppers – ex-Board of Education library

[12684]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. THE ARTHUR AND ELIZABETH SCHLESINGER LIBRARY ON THE HISTORY OF WOMEN IN AMERICA 1964-1966 Two Year Report

After Mr Schlesinger’s death in 1965 the name of Radcliffe College’s Women’s Archive was changed to honour that of ‘the first scholar to draw the attention of the historical profession and the public to “The Role of Women in American History”‘. The Report gives an account of new acquisitions and new buildings. Paper covers – 28pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library.

[12535]                                                                                                        £2.00 SOLD

  1. THE ASSOCIATION FOR MORAL AND SOCIAL HYGIENE The Alison Neilans Memorial Lectures AMSH

3 of these annual lectures: 1) No 5 Mary Stocks, Josephine Butler and the Moral Standards of Today, 1961; 2) No 6 T.C.N. Gibbens, The Clients of Prostitutes, 1962 and 3) A Summary of the Tenth Alison Neilans Memorial Lecture given by Dr R.D. Catterall, 1967.  Paper covers – in good condition, withdrawn from the Women’s Library. Together

[12337]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. THE EDUCATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE TEACHERS’ GUILD OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND A Catalogue of the Historical Section 1896

A list of  the  costumes, tables, charts, photographs, maps and lantern slides that were available for hire by teachers. Interesting. Paper covers – 20pp – fair – ex-Board of Education Library

[13219]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. THE FIRST REPORT OF THE BRISTOL REFUGE SOCIETY for the restoration of females who have unhappily fallen from virtue, ending 6 month 30, 1815; with a list of subscribers  facsimile of the edition printed for Philip Rose, Broadmead 1815

An interesting publication – full of names and address of donors and subscribers. Many Bristol worthies – but also their associates from around the country. A very well produced facsimile. Paper covers – very good

[10463]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. THE GREAT PARTNERSHIP Women’s Liberal Federation 1949

‘Being a report of the Enquiry Committee on Women’s Position in the Community set up by the Executive Committee of the Women’s Liberal Federation at the request of the Chairman of the Liberal Party Organisation’. Paper covers – 40pp – very good

[2879]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. THE HOUSEHOLD WASH A collection of modern postcards all associated with the household wash. 26 of the cards are reproductions of late-19th and early-20th century advertisements for e.g.Sunlight Soap, Recitts Blue, Rinso, Vim Persil etc. 8 cards are reproductions of various washing days. 2 cards are typograhical 1980s humour with a washing-day theme. Together with an original advertising 6-pp fold-out leaflet for E.G. Bentford’s Washing, Wringing and Mangling Machines. The leaflet is printed on both sides – showing, therefore, 12 of their lines of stock. The firm was based in Brighton – the leaflet dates from, I think, the beginning of the 20th century. The postcards are all unused and unposted. The advertising leaflet is in good condition. As a collection

[11626]                                                                                                      £25.00 SOLD

  1. THE HOUSING AND SLUM PROBLEM Questions and Answers Burrup, Mathieson & Co 1933

Paper covers -12pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12246]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. THE LEAGUE OF SERVICE Report, 1910-1911

‘The League of Service exists to bring such influences to bear upon the physical conditions and the homes of the chidlren of the nation that each child may at least begin life with a fair chance of attaining full development.’ The Report details the League’s work – in London only – with centres at King’s Cross, Marylebone and Battersea, each with its own ‘Mothers’ Dining Room’. Paper covers – 20pp -very good – ex-Board of Education library

[12737]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN OF GREAT BRITAIN Handbook 1960-61 National Council of Women 1961

Packed with names and addresses. Soft covers -56pp – fine

[12319]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. THE SPECTATOR AUGUST 6 1836

Includes a report of a wife offered for sale at ‘the new Islington cattle market’. She fetched 26s.

[14067]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. THE TEACHERS’ GUILD OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND Scheme of Proposed Teachers’ Guild Friendly Society (Sickness and Accident Fund) 1897

Insurance for teachers. The contributions for women teachers is set higher arising ‘from the fact that amonst women the frequency, if not the duration of sickness, is very much greater than amongst men of coresponding ages, and to provide for both on the same terms would be inequitable and unsafe.’ Soft covers – 12pp – good – ex-Board of Education Library

[13220]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. THE UNITED NATIONS AND THE STATUS OF WOMEN a survey of United Nations work to promote the civil and political rights of women UN 1961

Soft covers – 34pp – good condition – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[14992]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. THE WOMEN’S BRANCH FEDERATION Fifth Annual Report, 1912-13

‘Affiliated to the Social Institutes’ Union’ – ‘unites existing Clubs and Social Institutes for women and girls of the industrial community by promoting amongst them mutual interest and friendly intercourse.’ Good – in original wrappers – 16pp – 2 photos -ex-Board of Education lbirary

[12744]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. THE WOMEN’S BRANCH FEDERATION Sixth Annual Report, 1913-14

‘We can only conclude by saying that we have endeavoured to raise the standard of London Working Girls by encouraging them to take pleasure in interesting study, and employ their leisure hours in healthy and wholesome recreation.’ With details of all the affiliated Clubs. Paper covers -with photographs – 16pp – good – ex-Board of Education library

[12745]                                                                                                                  £14.00

  1. THE WOMEN’S LEAGUE OF SERVICE Report, 1911-1912

The League of Service was now renamed – and, in addition to those detailed in the 1910-11 Report, now had Centres in Hammersmith, Croydon and Bristol. Paper covers – 34pp – very good – ex-Board of Education library

[12738]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. TISSUE PROGRAMME AND SOUVENIR OF THE OPENING OF THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM BY THE KING June 26, 1909

This tissue doesn’t bear any information about its printer – so is probably not the work of Mrs Sarah Burgess, who was responsible for so many similar items. The tissue shows an image of the V & A, together with a portrait of King Edward VII – and union flags – together with details of the procession to the Museum and some brief details about its structure. In good condition

[14986]                                                                                                      £15.00 SOLD

  1. TOWN POLICE CLAUSES ACT, 1889 An Act to amend the provisions relating to Hackney Carriages of the Town Police Clauses Act, 1847 HMSO 24 June 1889

Withdrawn from the Associaiton for Moral and Social Hygiene Collection, the Women’s Library. 4-pp – good

[12547]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. UNIVERSITY TRAINING FOR WELFARE WORK IN INDUSTRY & COMMERCE A Report issued by the Joint University Council for Social Studies P.S. King 1921

‘The Joint University Council for Social Studies has for its object the co-ordination and development of the work of Social Study Departments in connection with the Universities of Great Britain and Ireland. The Hon Sec of the Council was Elizabeth Macadam. Among the members of the committee was Rose Squire. Paper covers – 18pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s library

[12546]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. WARWICK, The Countess Of Unemployment: its causes and consequences Twentieth Century Press, no date (c 1906)

Pamphlet – 16pp – first published as two articles in the ‘Daily Mail’  in Feb 1906. Good internally. The rather grubby pink paper covers – with a v glamourous photograph of the author – are present  – heavily chipped – but detached. Scarce

[14117]                                                                                                                  £45.00

  1. WIGHTMAN, Clare Women At Work and In Society Modern Records Centre, Warwick University, 2nd ed 1991

Gives sources for the subject in the Warwick Modern Records Centre. Paper covers – fine

[7541]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. WILKINS, Mrs Roland The Training and Employment of Education Women in Horticulture and Agriculture Women’s Farm and Garden Association 1927

Soft covers – 52pp – good – ex-Board of Education Library

[13213]                                                                                                                  £20.00

  1. WILLS AND INTESTACIES (FAMILY MAINTENANCE) BILL HMSO 1930

‘The object of this bill is to secure that, in the distribution of the estate of a testator or testatrix, a surviving husband or wife and any surviving children who are of an age necessitating parental support shall have a statutory right to certain provision out of the estate in order to secure the funds necessary for their maintenance.’ Paper covers – 14pp – withdrawn from the Women’s Library – good

[12564]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. WOMAN AT HOME (Annie S. Swan’s Magazine) Hodder & Stoughton 1894

Includes chapters from Annie Swan’s  ‘Elizabeth Glen, M.B.; the experiences of a lady doctor’, as well as the usual wide range of interviews, articles -including fashion, cookery and house furnishing, and stories. Good – hundreds of pages!

[13692]                                                                                                                  £18.00

  1. A WOMAN’S RIGHT TO CHOOSE Abortion Law Reform Association Why we must fight the Abortion (Amendment) Bill and how to go about it

20-pp pamphlet giving ‘Some Information about the Abortion (Amendment) Bill’ – and including a ‘List of Members of Parliament who voted AGAINST the Bill’s Second Reading, 7 Feb 1975)

[13197]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. WOMEN: A CULTURAL REVIEW OUP

1994 Spring, vol 5, no 1; Autumn vol 5, no 2; Winter vol 5, no 3

1995 Summer vol 6, no1; Autumn vol 6, no 2; Winter, vol 6, no 3

1996  Spring vol 7, issue 1; Autumn vol 7, no 2; Winter vol 7, no 3

1997 Sprng vol 8, no 1; Autumn vol 8. no 3

In very good condition – each

[14929]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. WOMEN IN REBELLION, 1900 Two Views on Class, Socialism and Liberation ILP 1973

Contains reprints of two pamphlets: ‘Working Women and the Suffrage’ by Mrs Wibaut (translated into English and pub in England in the 1890s) and ‘Women’s Freedom’ by Lily Gair Wilkinson. Soft covers – very good

[7867]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. WOMEN & LITERATURE, VOL 3, NO 2 Fall 1975

This issue contains the 1974 Bibliography of Women in British and American Literature, 1660-1900 – and articles on ‘The “Female Virtuoso” in early 18th-c English drama’, on  Willa Cather, and on Wollstonecraft, Godwin and Rousseau. Soft covers – very good

[7868]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. WOMEN’S EMPLOYMENT FEDERATION Careers: a memorandum on openings and trainings for girls and women 1964

The 21st ed. Soft covers – 146pp – very good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12281]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. WOMEN’S EMPLOYMENT FEDERATION Memorandum on Openings and Trainings for Women WEF 1936

Opportunities for women – from Accountancy to Youth Leadership. Paper covers – good -20pp

[12270]                                                                                                                  £15.00

  1. WOMEN’S EMPLOYMENT FEDERATION Women Want to Work: some notes on prospects, training and finding work for the older woman with a good educational background WEF 1964

Paper covers – 44pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12271]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. WOMEN’S GROUP ON PUBLIC WELFARE Loneliness: an enquiry into causes and possible remedies National Council of Social Service revised ed 1964

An interesting snapshot of one aspect of the early 1960s. Soft covers – 72pp – good – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12552]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. WOMEN’S REVIEW

Founded in 1985. Issues for sale:

1986 June, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec/Jan 1987

1987 Feb, March, April, May, June, July

In good condition – each

[14924]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. WOODFIELD 1951

Leaflet – folds out to three pages – with one separate page – a brochure for ‘Woodfield’ – a home for children. This is the type of home that doesn’t exist any longer – where parents left their children while they were abroad or otherwise engaged – rather than an orphanage or home for disturbed children. Woodfield was the home of Major and Mrs Whitelocke. ‘Our aim is still to provide at Woodfield the sort of nursery life which was a commonplace in our own childhood, and which made British Nannies so famous throughout Europe that no household of rank was considered complete without one.’

[11792]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. WRIGHT, Helena Marriage Modern Churchman’s Union no date (1920s?)

No 8 in ‘ a series of ten booklets dealing with religious matters of current interest.’ Good -20pp – withdrawn from the Women’s Library

[12265]                                                                                                                    £2.00

General Postcards

 

  1. BEDFORD COLLEGE The Common Room

Real photographic card – I can see a print of G. F.Watts’ ‘Hope’ among the pictures – and is that a portrait of Emily Penrose over the fireplace? I’m not sure. Very good – printed in Berlin so probably dates from pre-1914 – unposted

[13254]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. ‘BILLIE BURKE’

American actress (1884-1970). From the Hodgson sisters’ collection. In very good condition, with traces of adhesive on the reverse

[14744]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. CLARK’S COLLEGE, CIVIL SERVICE Preparing for the Lady Clerk’s G.P.O. Exam

Photographic postcard of the young women preparing for this exam which, if they passed, offered a chance of bettering themselves. Very good – unposted

[9233]                                                                                                                    £12.00

  1. MAUDE FEALY

American actress (1883-1971). From the Hodgson sisters’ collection. In very good condition, with traces of adhesive on the reverse.

[14746]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. MISS LILY BRAYTON

photograph of the actress and singer (1876-1953). A card from the Hodgson sisters’ collection. On the reverse is written in pencil ‘Ophelia’ suggesting the image shows her in ‘Hamlet’ in which she played Ophelia in 1905. In very good condition – with traces of adhesive on the reverse.

[14743]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. MISS MAXINE ELLIOTT

American actress (1868-1940).. In very good condition, with traces of adhesive on the reverse. From the Hodgson sisters’ collection.

[14745]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. RUTH VINCENT

English actress and opera singer (1877-1955) – photograph by Ralph Dunn of 63 Barbican, London EC. Because the word ‘Amasis’ is written in pencil on the revers of the card, I think it dates from around 1906/7 when Ruth Vincent was appearing in the lead role. In very good condition, with traces of adhesive on the reverse. In very good condition – from the Hodgson sisters’ collection

[14742]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. MISS DOROTHEA BAIRD

English actress (1875-1933). In very good condition – with traces of adhesive on the reverse – from the Hodgson sisters’ collection.

[14741]                                                                                                                    £4.00

Music Hall Sheet Music and Postcards

 

  1. KITTY GILLOW

poses in top hat and tails – with cigar. A latter-day music-hall actress, she has signed her photograph – which was taken in Jersey in 1964

[10700]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. MISS ELLA SHIELDS B. Feldman 1914

sings ‘Just One Kiss – Just Another One’ and is photographed in top hat and tails on the cover of the sheet music. The song was written by William Hargreaves and Dan Lipton. Very god

[10675]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. MISS ELLA SHIELDS Campbell, Connelly & Co 1925

sings ‘Show Me the Way to Go Home’, written by Irving King, and is photographed as an awkward young man on the cover of the sheet music. Good

[10678]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. MISS ELLA SHIELDS Lawrence Wright 1925

sings ‘When the Bloom is On the Heather’ and is photographed in top hat and tails on the cover of the sheet music. Very good

[10681]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. MISS ELLA SHIELDS Francis, Day & Hunter 1927

sings ‘I’m Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover’ and is photographed in close up on the cover wearing her top hat and white bow tie. Fair – some marks on cover

[10682]                                                                                                        £5.00 SOLD

  1. MISS ELLA SHIELDS Lawrence Wright 1929

sings ‘Home in Maine’ and is photographed in sailor attire on cover of sheet music. Good

[10688]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. MISS HETTY KING Francis, Day & Hunter 1908

sings ‘I’m Afraid to Come Home in the Dark’ and is photographed on the cover of the sheet music in extravagantly elegant top hat and tails. Very good

[10684]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. MISS NORA DELANEY Lawrence Wright 1929

sings ‘Glad Rag Doll’ and is photographed in male evening dress on the cover of the sheet music. Good

[10687]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. MISS VESTA TILLEY

photographic postcard of her in waistcoat and trilby, together with a cigarette card of woman in male evening dress. Good – card posted in 1907

[10695]                                                                                                                    £6.00

  1. MISS ZENA DARE

photographic postcard of her in male attire. Very good – posted in 1906

[10693]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. ‘MR WINIFRED WARD’

as she signs in ink (real signature) a photograph of herself in evening dress. She was an acclaimed male impersonater in the early 20th century. Fine

[10697]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. VESTA TILLEY Francis, Day & Hunter 1905

sings ‘Who Said, “Girls”?’. Sheet music featuring photograph on cover of Vesta Tilley in smart male attire. The ditty begins: ‘One day on a Western claim/Miners vow’d their lives were tame, For in that lonel spot there seldom girls had been.’ Good

[10670]                                                                                                                    £7.00

  1. VESTA TILLEY Francis, Day & Hunter 1896

sings ‘He’s Going In For this Dancing Now’, sheet music, written by E.W. Rogers. Very good – except that the front cover is semi-detached

[10672]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. WINIFRED WARD

modern reproduction of postcard photograph of her as man-about town. Fine

[10698]                                                                                                                    £3.00

 

General Fiction – including Poetry

 

  1. AITKEN, David Sleeping with Jane Austen No Exit Press 2000

Facetious crime novel. Soft covers – very good

[12417]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. ANON ( W.R.H. Trowbridge) The Grandmother’s Advice to Elizabeth T. Fisher Unwin 1902

‘Suggested by the ‘Visits of Elizabeth’  by Elinor Glyn.’ Paper covers – good

[3078]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. BAILLIE, Joanna A Series of Plays in which it is attempted to delineate the stronger passions of the mind Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, & Brown, a new edition 1821

A handsome set – newly rebound in cloth

[2509]                                                                                                                    £60.00

  1. BARKER, Pat Double Vision Penguin 2005

A novel centring on a war reporter returning from Afghanistan. Soft covers – fine

[10468]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. BINKLEY, Phyllis Et Al (eds) Amazon Expedition: a lesbian feminist anthology Times Change Press 1973

Includes articles by Joanna Russ and Ti-Grace Atkinson. Paper covers – good

[13294]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. BLATCHFORD, Robert A Bohemian Girl and Mr Ginnis Clarion Newpaper Co Ltd 1901 (r/p)

Good

[2957]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. BOWERING, Marilyn Visible Worlds Flamingo 1999

A novel. Soft covers – very good

[10050]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. BRACKENBURY, Alison Bricks and Ballads Carcanet 2004

Poems. Soft covers – mint

[9854]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. BREEN, Jennifer (ed) Women Romantic Poets 1785-1832: an anthology J.M. Dent 1992

Soft covers – very good

[10905]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. BRONTE, Emily Wuthering Heights OUP 2009

Text edited by Ian Jack, with an introduction and additional notes by Helen Small. In World’s Classics series. Soft covers

[11721]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. CARUS-WILSON, Mrs Ashley Thora: memoirs of a nineteenth-century woman Hodder & Stoughton 1896

A section from a larger work, ‘Tokiwa and Other Poems’. Good – with library stamp

[4590]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. CLIFT, Charmian Walk to the Paradise Gardens Harper & Bros (NY) 1960

First US edition of this Australian novel. Very good in very good d/w, which is slightly chipped at top and bottom of spine

[12458]                                                                                                                  £25.00

  1. DAWKINS, Cecil Charleyhorse Pandora 1986

Hardcovers – fine in fine d/w

[5728]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. DOLARO, Selina Bella-Demonia: a dramatic story Henry J. Drane (c.1890)

[2853]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. DONNELLY, Jennifer A Gathering Light bloomsbury 2004

Set in the Adirondack mountains at the beginning of the 20th century. Soft covers – fine

[10478]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. DUGDALE, Sasha Notebook Carcanet 2003

Poems. Soft covers – mint

[9485]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. DUNSFORD, Cathie Ao Toa: Earth Warriors Spinifex 2004

A New Zealand eco-thriller. Soft covers – mint

[10137]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. EL SAADAWI, Nawal The Circling Song Zed Books 1989

A novel. Soft covers – fine

[9897]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. FLETCHER, Beryl The Blood Wood Gain Spinifex 1999

An Australian novel. Soft covers – fine

[10053]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. FLETCHER, Beryl The House at Karamu Spinifex 2003

A New Zealand novel. Soft covers – mint

[10136]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. FYFIELD, Frances Safer Than Houses Little, Brown 2005

A London sort-of detective novel. Fyfield’s character is Sarah Fortune – ex-lawyer. Soft cover – large format – fine

[10471]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. GALGOCZI, Erzsébet Another Love Cleis Press 1980

‘In 1959, In Budapest, a communist opposing the Soviets is an outlaw, a lesbian unthinkable, and Eva Szalánczky’s got the police on her back…’Soft covers – very good

[13461]                                                                                                                    £2.00

  1. GALLOWAY, Janice (ed) Meantime: looking forward to the millennium: an anthology of women’s writing Polygon 1991

Collection of short stories, poems and essays based loosely around what was then the approaching millenium. Soft covers – fine

[10899]                                                                                                                    £5.00

  1. GASKELL, Elizabeth Cranford OUP 2011

With introduction by Dinah Birch. Soft covers – mint

[13428]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. GAWSWORTH, John (ed) The Poetry Review, March-April 1951

Contributors include A.E. Coppard and Viola Meynell. Soft covers – good

[7266]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. GEE, Sue Earth & Heaven Review 2000

Soft covers – fine

[10479]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. GEE, Sue The Mysteries of Glass Review 2004

Soft covers – fine

[10477]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. GLAZER, Daphne The Last Oasis Sumach Press 1992

A collection of stories about ordinary working people struggling with moments of change or revelation. Soft covers – very good

[10042]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. GRAHAM, Jorie Never Carcanet 2002

Poems. ‘Filled with the spirit of Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bishop and Gerard Manley Hopkins, the poems also wrestle with the ghosts of Darwin and Lamarch, minutely analysing individual moments of consciousness.’ Soft covers – fine

[9473]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. GREGORY, Philippa A Respectable Trade HarperCollins 1995

A novel set in Bristol in 1787 – a Bristol booming on the back of the slave trade. Proof copy – fine

[10466]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. HALL, Sandi Rumours of Dreams Spinifex 1999

A novel. Soft covers – fine

[7555]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. HITE, Shere The Divine Comedy of Ariadne and Jupiter Peter Owen 1994

Mint in d/w

[5462]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. HUGHES, Ted Wolfwatching Faber 1989

Soft covers – very good

[12032]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. HULL, Gloria T. Healing Heart: poems 1973-1988 Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press 1989

Soft covers – mint

[9911]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. INGELOW, Jean Poems George Routledge, no date (c 1900??)

Good – cloth covers faded

[3609]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. IRWIN, Hadley We Are Mesquakie, We Are One Sheba 1984

A story of the Mesquakie, American Indians. Paper covers – fine

[5731]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. KANE, Sarah Complete Plays Methuen Drama 2001

Introduced by David Greig. Comprises ‘Blasted’, ‘Phaedra’s love’, ‘Clansed’, Crave’, ‘4.48 Psychosis’, ‘Skin’. Soft covers – fine

[12029]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. KOPPLEMAN, Susan (ed) Old Maids: short stories by 19th-century US women writers Pandora 1984

Soft covers – very good

[8122]                                                                                                                      £7.00

  1. LEHMANN, Beatrix Rumour of Heaven Methuen, 2nd ed 1935

Good

[4120]                                                                                                                      £7.00

  1. LEHMANN, John (ed) The London Magazine Nov 1956

Contributions from Mary Hutchinson, Colin Wilson and John  Wain. Paper covers – very good

[8743]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. LEVERSON, Ada Love’s Shadow Chapman & Hall 1950

Reprint of the 1908 edition. Good

[3086]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. LINGARD, Joan Encarnita’s Journey Allison & Busby 2005

A novel interweaving the life of the writer Gerard Brenan – who arrives in Yegen, in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, in 1920 –  with that of Encarnita, a young Spanish woman. Other Bloomsberries, Lytton Strachey, Dora Carrington, the Woolfs and Lytton Strachey, pass in and out. Soft covers – fine

[10465]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. LUTYENS, Mary So Near to Heaven Michael Joseph 1943

Good in torn d/w

[8352]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. MACDONALD, M.P. Trefoil: the story of a girl’s society Thomas Nelson no date (c 1908?)

An Australian (Melbourne) girls’ story. Good

[2489]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. MACPHEE, Kona Tails Bloodaxe Books 2004

Poems. Soft covers – mint

[9484]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. MARCHANT, Bessie Juliette the Mail-Carrier Collins (r/p), no date

Set in Nova Scotia – young Juliette comes good – taking over the position as mail carrier in her element-battered home region. Sunday School prize dated 1924. Very good

[8047]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. MARTIN, Valerie The Unfinished Novel and Other Stories Weidenfeld & Nicolson 2006

Soft covers – fine

[10469]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. MARTZ, Sandra (ed) If I Had a Hammer: women’s work in poetry, fiction and photographs Papier-Mache Press 1990

Soft covers – mint

[6777]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. MEADOR, Betty Inanna: Lady of the Largest Heart: poems of the Sumerian high priestess, Enheduanna Univversity of Texas Press 2000

Soft covers – very good

[9469]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. MEW, Charlotte The Farmer’s Bride The Poetry Bookshop, 3rd imp 1929

Very good internally – cover sunned around edges

[7693]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. MILLER, Isabel The Love of Good Women Black Swan 1988

A novel. Soft covers – very good

[10036]                                                                                                                    £3.00

  1. MINER, Valerie Movement Methuen 1985

A novel, with introduction by Susan Griffin. Good reading copy – ex-library in d/w

[8780]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. NOEL, Lady Augusta From Generation to Generation Elkin Mathews 1929

First published in 1879. Very good

[2838]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. OLDHAM, June A Little Rattle in the Air Virago 1990

Soft covers – very good

[8775]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. PARKER, Derek (ed) An Anthology of Erotic Prose Abacus 1981

Soft covers – good reading copy

[9904]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. PAULL, M.A. Rhoda’s Reform Nelson no date (c 1905?)

Fair – one plate loose

[2842]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. PIKE, G. Holden Daughters of the Flower Market: a story of four London bouquetieres Religious Tract Society, no date (c 1900?)

Bears a 1904 (boys’) school prize label. Contains a wealth of social observation – and line-drawings

[3612]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. PROCTER, Adelaide Anne Legends and Lyrics Bell & Daldy, 14th ed 1872

Poems by a leading member of the Langham-Place group.  very good – leather, with gilt decorations and all edges gilt

[1585]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. QUINN, Anthony Half the Human Race Cape 2011

‘London. In the sweltering summer of 1911, the streets ring to the cheers of the new king’s coronation, and to the cries of suffragist women marching for the vote. One of them is the 21-year-old daughter of a middle-class Islington family fallen on hard times…Forced to abandon her dream of a medical career she is now faced with another hard choice – to maintain lawful protest against an intransigient government or to join the glass-breaking militants in the greatest cause…’ I was, I must admit, surprised to find it engaging and intelligent – rather more convincing than many of the early 20th-century suffragist novels. And there’s a man and cricket in there as well. A good read. Mint in mint d/w – signed by the author

[12485]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. ROBERTS, Denis Kilham (ed) Penguin Parade no. 1 Penguin Aug 1938 (reprint)

Soft covers – very good

[7263]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. SHARP, Mrs William (ed) Women’s Voices: an anthology of the most characteristic poems by English, Scotch and Irish women Walter Scott 1887

Includes the work of Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle, Lady Winchelsea, hester Piozzi, Anna Letitia Barbauld, Helen Maria Williams, Sara Coleridge, harriet Martineau, Mary Howitt, Mary Cowden-Clarke, Isa Craig-Knox, Augusta Webster, Violet Fane, Emily Pfeiffer, Mathilde Blind, E.H. Hickey, Constance Naden, Amy Levy, Ellice Hopkins and Katherine Tynan – and many others. Covers (leather-type) embossed with the insignia of Magdelen College School, Wainfleet, Lincolnshire – and inside is an inscription to Annie Abraham who was given the book as a Divinity Prize in 1888. Annie (1876-1934) was the daughter of a local farmer, in 1901 was a teacher in a school at Matlock, Derbyshire, and by 1911 had moved to teach at a girls’ school in Newport, Monmouthshire, whee she remained until her death. Good – a little rubbed – all edges gilt.

[14977]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. SHAW, Bernard An Unsocial Socialist Virago 1988 (reprint)

Paper covers – fine

[5492]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. SHERWOOD, Mrs The Happy Family Houlston & Sons, new edition no date

A little tract – paper covers. Fine

[3607]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. SIGOURNEY, Mrs (ed. F.W.N. Bailey) The Poetical Works of Mrs L.H. Sigourney G. Routledge 1857

Neatly rebound in cloth

[2428]                                                                                                                    £10.00

  1. SINCLAIR, May The Dark Night Macmillan (NY) 1924

‘A novel in unrhymed verse. Number 330 of 350 copied signed by the author. This copy is further inscribed by May Sinclair ‘To dear Alys with love’.  Fine internally, cover a little marked. No d/w

[14973]                                                                                                                  £65.00

  1. SNELL, Roy Norma Kent of the WACS Whitmand Publishing Co (Wisconsin) 1943

In the ‘Fighters for Freedom’ series. Norma Kent joined the Women’s Army Corps, never left mainland America, but had lots of adventures and did her part to win the war! Good in d/w

[2448]                                                                                                                    £18.00

  1. SOUEIF, Ahdaf In the Eye of the Sun Bloomsbury 1992

‘The Great English Novel about Egypt’/’The Great Egyptian Novel About England’. Very good in d/w. 791pp – heavy

[9927]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. SPENDER, Dale The Diary of Elizabeth Pepys Grafton 1991

Elizabeth gives her account of life with Samuel. Soft covers – very good

[11232]                                                                                                                    £8.00

  1. SWAN, Annie S. Aldersyde: a Border story of seventy years ago Oliphant, Anderson, & Ferrier 1885 (r/p)

Good reading copy – cover marked

[9697]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. SWAN, Annie S. Carlowrie: or, among Lothian folk  Oliphant, Anderson and Ferrier, no date, reprint (1890s?)

Good reading copy

[9696]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. TAYLOR, Kate Madame Proust and the Kosher Kitchen Vintage 2004

Enjoyable novel, Canadian literary researcher in Paris – parallel portraits of old and new worlds. Soft covers – fine

[10470]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. TENNYSON, Mary H. A Cruel Dilemma Warne, no date r/p (c 1895)

Fair

[3066]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. THE LONDON MERCURY April 1935

Includes a couple of poems by Sylvia Townsend Warner. Soft covers – good

[8561]                                                                                                                      £8.00

  1. TYTLER, Ann Fraser Leila At Home T. Hatchard 1852

‘A continuatation of ‘Leila in England’. Good in new cloth binding

[3047]                                                                                                                    £15.00

  1. VARGAS, Fred The Three Evangelists Harvill Secker 2006

Translated from French by Sian Reynolds. ‘Fred Vargas’ is, in fact, a Frenchwoman, an historian and archaeologist by profession. A detective novel set in Paris. Soft covers – large format – fine

[10472]                                                                                                                    £4.00

  1. WALKER, Alice By the Light of My Father’s Smile Women’s Press 1998

A novel.- ‘A story of requited love, crossing over, and the sexual healing of the soul’. Fine in d/w

[14812]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. WHITTLE, Tyler The Young Victoria: a novel Heinemann 1971

Good in d/w – though ex-library

[6521]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. WOOD, Mrs Henry A Life’s Secret R.E. King, no date (r/p)

Reading copy

[8360]                                                                                                                      £2.00

  1. WOOD, Mrs Henry Mrs Halliburton’s Troubles Richard Bentley 1893

Good reading copy

[2863]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. WOOD, Mrs Henry The Red Court Farm Macmillan 1908 (r/p)

Good reading copy

[4449]                                                                                                                      £3.00

  1. WOOD, Mrs Henry Roland Yorke Richard Bentley 1896

Good reading copy

[6190]                                                                                                                      £6.00

  1. WOOLFE, Sue Leaning Towards Infinity Women’s Press 1998

A novel. Soft covers – mint

[7565]                                                                                                                      £4.00

  1. YONGE, Charlotte M. A Book of Golden Deeds T. Nelson, no date, reprint

Good reading copy

[9698]                                                                                                                      £5.00

  1. YONGE, Charlotte M. The Dove in the Eagle’s Nest Macmillan 1908 (r/p)

Very good

[9700]                                                                                                                      £6.00

 

Women and the First World War

 

  1. CROFTON, Eileen The Women of Royaumont: a Scottish women’s hospital on the Western Front Tuckwell Press 1997

Excellent study. Soft covers – very good

[14225]                                                                                                                  £12.00

  1. DOUGLAS-PENNANT, Violet Under the Search-Light: the record of a great scandal Allen & Unwin 1922

In June 1918 Violet Douglas-Pennant was appointed Commandant, Women’s Royal Air Force – only to be dismissed two months later ‘by direction of Lord Weir and Sir Auckland Geddes on the advice of Lady Rhondda, who acted without enquiry on secret information supplied to her, as well as to Mr Tyson Wilson MP, and Miss P. Strachey, by Mrs Beatty and others’. How intriguing. The book takes 463 pp to cover the ‘scandal’. Douglas-Pennant wrote it as her self-justificatory account of events “so that my name & honour may at last be vindicated.” Includes recollections of her ten weeks’ in charge, a Who’s Who of the personalities involved & full details of the House of Lords Inquiry into her dismissal. Good

[14129]                                                                                                                  £85.00

  1. HUTTON, I. Emslie With a Woman’s Unit in Serbia, Salonika and Sebastopol Williams and Norgate 1928

A doctor, she began working with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in 1915, first in France and then in the east.  With 13 photographs – 302pp -very good – very scare

[14901]                                                                                                                  SOLD

  1. (THURSTAN) Violetta Thurstan Field Hospital and Flying Column: being the journal of an English nursing sister in Belgium and Russia G.P. Putnam’s 1916 (r/p)

Very good – very scarce

[14910]                                                                                                                  £65.00

  1. BIBESCO, Princesse La Revue de Paris extrait du numero du 15 mai 1934: Lettres de Combattants Anglais Paris 1934

A lengthy review, in French, of ‘War Letters of Fallen Englishmen (Lettres de guerre d’hommes anglais qui sont tombès) compiled by Laurence Housman. She reviews it at length (24pp), quoting from letters of both the well -known (Julian Grenfell, Edward Tennant) and the unknown. The intriguing Princess Bibescco (nèe Elizabeth Asquith, daugher of  H.A. Asquith) was a novelist of some repute,Very good – paper covers – offprint of the journalpaign

[14964]                                                                                                                  £10.00

  1. MUNITION WORKERS

– mainly women  -pose for the photographer. They are wearing their caps and the triangular-shaped munition workers badge can be seen pinned to many of the overall dresses. Young men sit at the front – displaying the fruits of their labours – shells.There were a number of munitions factories in Bradford, including the Low Moor munitions factory that suffered a large explosion in 1916. There’s no clue as to the name of the factory in the photograph. The card bears the imprint of the Belle Vue Studios, Bradford – which was one of the best-known in the city and was in business until 1985. Good condition – appears to have been cut down by about 1 cm at some time

[14442]                                                                                                                  £35.00

  1. YOUR KING & COUNTRY WANT YOU a woman’s recruiting song  Chappell & Co 1914

Sheet music – words & music by Paul A. Rubens. The cover is illustrated by John Hassall. ‘The entire profits from the sale of this song will be devoted to Queen Mary’s “Work for Women” Fund’. ‘Oh! we don’t want to lose you but we think you ought to go. For your King and your Country both need you so; We shall want you and miss you but with all our might and main. We shall cheer you, thank you, kiss you when you come back again’. Makes the spine creep. 6-pp – very good

[14390]                                                                                                                  £38.00

  1. DENNYS, Joyce And GORDON, Hampden, and TINDALL, M.C. Our Hospitals A.B.C. John Lane no date (c. 1916)

VAD’s alphabet – by one of them.  Joyce Dennys did the delightful illustrations to match the humourous verses. Very good – grey paper boards – with two small marks (tea/coffee??)  on the cover- internally the images are fresh and sharp

[14899]                                                                                                                  £70.00

  1. MARCHANT, Bessie A Girl Munition Worker: a story of a girl’s work during the Great War Blackie [no date -1st ed 1916?]

Novel of the First World War. May be first edition, as no publishing details are given, but has gift inscription for Christmas 1919 from ‘Mother’ to ‘Miss N. Goodwin’. The lovely pictorial cover is clean and bright – in very good condition – very scarce

[14913]                                                                                                                  £60.00

You can pay me by cheque or (if from overseas) at www.Paypal.com, using my email address as the payee account, or by direct bank transfer

 

In case you are interested in books I have written (and still in print) they are ~

 

Art and Suffrage: a biographical dictionary of suffrage artists discusses the lives and work of over 100 artists, each of whom made a positive contribution to the women’s suffrage campaign. Most, but not all, the artists were women, many belonging to the two suffrage artists’ societies – the Artists’ Suffrage League and the Suffrage Atelier. Working in a variety of media –producing cartoons, posters, banners, postcards, china, and jewellery – the artists promoted the suffrage message in such a way as to make the campaign the most visual of all those conducted by contemporary pressure groups.

In the hundred plus years since it was created, the artwork of the suffrage movement has never been so widely disseminated and accessible as it is today, the designs as appealing as they were during the years before the First World War when the suffrage campaign was at its height. Yet hitherto little has been known about most of the artists who produced such popular images. Art and Suffrage remedies this lack and sets their artistic contribution to the suffrage cause within the context of their reanimated lives, giving biographical details, including addresses, together with information on where their work may be seen.

With over 100 illustrations, in black-and-white and in colour.

Published by Francis Boutle     Soft cover                                                £20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**

 

Kate Parry Frye: the long life of an Edwardian actress and suffragette

Published by ITV Ventures as a tie-in with the series: ‘The Great War: The People’s Story’ this e-book tells Kate’s life story from her Victorian childhood to her brave engagement with the Elizabethan New Age. For details see here (and many more posts on my website).

Available to download from iTunes or Amazon

 

***

 

The Women’s Suffrage Movement 1866-1928: A reference guide

Elizabeth Crawford

‘It is no exaggeration to describe Elizabeth Crawford’s Guide as a landmark in the history of the women’s movement…’  History Today

Routledge, 2000 785pp paperback £74.99 – Ebook £70

                   

 

 

The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain and Ireland: a regional survey

Elizabeth Crawford

Crawford provides meticulous accounts of the activists, petitions, organisations, and major events pertaining to each county.’ Victorian Studies

Routledge, 2008 320pp paperback £30

     Ebook           £26

**

Enterprising Women: the Garretts and their circle

Elizabeth Crawford

‘Crawford’s scholarship is admirable and Enterprising Women offers increasingly compelling reading’ Journal of William Morris Studies

For further details see here

Francis Boutle, 2002 338pp 75 illus paperback £25

Copies of all of these books may be bought direct from the publishers or from me or ordered from any bookshop (terrestrial or online)

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Kate Frye’s Diary: What Was Kate Doing One Hundred Years Ago Today – The Day She Appears On Our TV Screens?

Tonight Kate Parry Frye – in the guise of Romola Garai – appears on our television screens (Sunday 17 August, ITV at 9pm). What was she doing on this day 100 years ago?

Kate was still on holiday from her work with the New Constitutional Society for Women’s Suffrage, spending the time with her sister and mother in their rented rooms at 10 Milton Street, Worthing. However, this was no summer idyll such as the Fryes had enjoyed in days gone by. Then they had rented a large house and travelled down from London with their four servants, to spend a season by the sea. Now that they were virtually penniless, these rented rooms were all they could call home. In the life of Kate and, more tragically in that of  her sister, we see the jarring disconnect when young women, brought up to a life where marriage was to be their only trade, are left with insufficient money to support their social position and expectations. As such Kate’s life story is very much a tale of its time.

Monday August 17th 1914

Gorgeous day. Up and at house work. Out 12.30-  just to the shops. Wrote all the afternoon  and after tea to 6. Papers full of interest. Preparing for the biggest battle in the World’s History. There is no doubt the English have landed over there. I hear from John most days – that he is very busy but not a word of what his work is. Mickie [her Pomeranian] and I went out after tea. Agnes still a bit limp.

John Collins, Kate’s fiancé, who had long been an officer in the Territorial Army, had already been recalled to his barracks at Shoeburyness – leaving his engagement with a touring repertory theatre company. Kate’s sister, Agnes, at the first hint of the European trouble had taken to her bed, prostrate. Kate, a would-be playwright, was busy writing – although exactly what she was writing at this time she doesn’t divulge. On her death forty-five years later she left behind a box of unpublished scripts – and one that was published. She  hoped one day to achieve fame and fortune. As it was she would soon be back at work at her suffrage society’s headquarters – with a new role as organizer of their War Work Work Room.

Work Room set up by the New Constitutional Society for Women's Suffrage - of which Kate was in charge. Note the NCS flag in the background - the only image of it that survives

Work Room set up by the New Constitutional Society for Women’s Suffrage – of which Kate was in charge. Note the NCS flag in the background – the only image of it that survives

Kate

To discover more about the entirety of Kate’s life – her upbringing, her involvement with the suffrage movement, her marriage, her London flats, her life in a Buckinghamshire hamlet, her love of the theatre, her times as an actress, her efforts as a writer, her life on the Home Front during two world wars, her involvement with politics – and her view of the world from the 1890s until October 1958  – download the e-book – £4.99 – from iTunes – http://bit.ly/PSeBKPFITVal. or  £4.99 from Amazon.

I’d love to hear what you think of Kate and the life she lived. 

To read in detail about Kate’s involvement in the women’s suffrage campaign – in a beautifully-produced, highly illustrated, conventional paper book – see  Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary.

Copyright

All the articles on Woman and Her Sphere and are my copyright. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without my permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement.

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Suffrage Stories: Mrs Frood, Topsham’s Suffragette/ist

Some time ago, when researching a talk,  ‘No Vote No Census’, that I gave in October 2011 conference on the 1911 census organised by the National Archives, I came across the boycotting census form of Mrs Frood of Topsham. Since then I have passed on this discovery to a researcher associated with Topsham Museum who has been able to link Mrs Frood directly to the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, the 100th anniversary of which is being celebrated in Topsham today, 4 July 2013.

The 3 March 1911 edition of Votes for Women contains a letter from Mrs M.C. I. Frood of Station Road, Topsham,  in which she described how, early in the morning of the polling day for the last election (which must have been Dec 1910/Jan 1911),  she went out with a pot of ‘good, white oil paint’ [I like the fact that it was ‘good] and ‘printed on the inner edge of the pavement along which voters would pass on the way to the polling station ‘Taxation Without Representation is Tyranny’ and ‘Britons never, never, never shall be slaves. I also printed it along the brick wall of my field, which they also had to pass coming and going to and from the train. ..On the large doors of my field, near the same spot, I printed ‘No Votes No Taxes’. I find my field gate a useful place to stick cartoons and cuttings from Votes for Women.’

A month later Mrs Frood was one of those suffragettes who boycotted the 1911 census. Together with one of her daughters, her servant, Beatrice Hutchings and six unknown females, to whom she had clearly given boycotting shelter, she refused to fill in any details on her census form, writing across it ‘If I am intelligent enough to fill up this paper, I am intelligent enough to put a cross on a voting paper. No Vote No Census.’

The census enumerator, Mr.H. J. Baker, reported this act of civil disobedience to the Census Office and received a reply from its Secretary, Archer Bellingham, instructing him to fill out the form with the best information he could muster. Mr Baker then annotated the letter, quoting Mrs Frood as saying to him that she had had  a ‘house full’ of boycotters on census night – and ‘that I am therefore adding to Numbers 6’.  With this number revealed as an arbitrary choice of the enumerator, we can only speculate as to how many Topsham women spent the night at Little Broadway House in Station Road.

Although in 1911 it would appear that Mrs Frood, as a correspondent to Votes for Women, was a supporter of the WSPU, by 1913 she is listed in The Suffrage Annual and Women’s Who’s Who as secretary of the Topsham branch of the NUWSS. Perhaps she was one of those who were dismayed by the WSPU’s increasingly militant tactics. It was one thing to paint slogans (with ‘good’ paint’) on pavements and walls, but quite another to break windows and commit arson. So it was as a leading local NUWSS member that Mrs Frood took part in the Suffrage Pilgrimage in early July 1913.

Who was Mrs Frood?

Mrs Mary Catherine Isabella Frood (nee Campbell, c. 1856-1931) had been born of Scottish parentage in Canada and was living in New Zealand when, in 1878, she married James Nicholson Frood (d. 1913), an Irish-born doctor. She had five children, the first four, all daughters, born in New Zealand and the last, a son, born at sea c 1888 – presumably as the family was returning to England. One of her daughters, Hester, was successful as an artist. Although Mrs Frood actually died in London, her address was still in Topsham – 26 The Strand (Old Court House).

26 The Strand, Topsham. Photo courtesy of Derek Harper (geograph.co.uk)

26 The Strand, Topsham. Photo courtesy of Derek Harper (geograph.co.uk)

Where was Dr Frood in 1911?

Dr Frood was living with his family (whose name was misrendered as ‘Froud’) when the 1901 census was taken.  But where was he in 1911? The name on the cover of the census form had been written as ‘Dr Frood’, but this had been amended to ‘Mrs Frood’ and it is she who is shown as ‘Head of Household’. I can find no trace of James Frood elsewhere in the 1911 census, although he did not die until 1913, his death registered in the local area. Interestingly under the terms of his will probate was granted to the Public Trustee rather than to his wife or any other member of the family.

Where was Little Broadway House?

Thanks to Street View I can see Station Road and the pavement along which Mrs Frood painted her slogans. Thanks to Paul Tucker (see Comment below) who tells me that Little Broadway House is still there – the house with the overhanging upper window that I can see in Street View – although now divided into two.  Presumably the ground to its side was Mrs Frood’s field. So let’s take a moment to visualise  its gates – decorated with Votes for Women cartoon – a reminder to those walking past on their way to the station that one Topsham woman was prepared to do her bit to win  ‘votes for women’.

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Suffrage Stories: Suffrage Sympathisers In Late-19th-Century Alton, Hampshire

While researching ‘women’s suffrage’ in the Hampshire Record Office, Anthony Brunning came across an interesting record of the 19th-century campaign. He has kindly given me permission to publish – below – the names of the Alton women who in 1894 signed the Special Appeal, organised in the hope of  convincing the government of the day that women were serious in their call for enfranchisement. The names were, mistakenly, excluded from the final total of 257,796. If anyone has any further information on any of the ladies listed, do let me know.

As the documents bearing the names included in the grand total were, apparently, returned to the various societies with which they were associated, Mrs Wickham’s collecting book is a rare survivor of one of the campaigns that belies the popularly-held view that the 19th-century women’s suffrage campaign lacked enterprise.

You can find details of the Special Appeal Committee in the entry of that name in my The Women’s Suffrage Movement: a reference guide. 

Alton Suffragists in 1894

by Anthony Brunning

Among the documents in the Wickham Family papers held by the Hampshire Record Office in Winchester is a Booklet for collecting signatures for an appeal to the House of Commons for an extension of Parliamentary Franchise to women. The booklet was produced by a Special Appeal Committee, formed for the purpose of collecting signatures, under the Chairmanship of Mrs Fawcett.[1] The signed books were to be returned to the Secretary at the Appeal Office (Albany Buildings, 47, Victoria Street, Westminster) by15 January 1894. A page at the end of the booklet states that “the booklet was to be returned to Mrs. Wickham, Binsted Wyke or Miss Julia Cameron, 47 Victoria St., Westminster.”

At the beginning of the booklet is the appeal:

AN APPEAL FROM WOMEN

Of all Parties and all Classes

To the Members of the House of commons

Gentlemen

Many of the women who sign this appeal differ in opinion on other political questions, but all are of one mind that the continued denial of the franchise to women while it is at the same time being gradually extended amongst men is at once unjust and inexpedient.

In our homes it fosters the impression that women’s opinion of questions of public interest is of no value to the nation, while the fact of women having no vote lessens the representative character of the House of Commons.

In the factory and workshop it places power to restrict women’s work in the hands of men who are working alongside of women whom they too often treat as rivals rather than as fellow-workers.

In Parliament it prevents men from realizing how one-sided are many of the laws affecting women.

We therefore earnestly beg you to support any well-considered measure for the extension of the Parliamentary franchise to women.

Each page had two tear off slips in which ladies could signify their consent to the Appeal.  Each slip had line for signing their Christian and surname, stating their title (Mrs., Miss, or other), give an address and record the name of the Parliamentary constituency in which they lived. Above the tear-off slips were three directives: “N.B. ― All Women over 18 may sign. Each must sign for herself. No one may sign twice.” Each slip began with the statement “I have read the Appeal from Women and desire that my name be added.” The booklet contained twenty-five pages of slips with serrations between them.

Thirty of the ladies who signed came from Alton, two from Binsted 4 miles east by north from Alton and one from East Worldham, 2 miles south-east of Alton. All lived with the Eastern Division of Hants (Petersfield).

Name Title Address
Sophia Emma Wickham Mrs Binsted Wyke, Alton
Eleonore Clements Mrs Binsted Wyke, Alton
Maria Hall Mrs The Manor House, Alton
Ethel M. Hall Miss The Manor House, Alton
Edith Turner Mrs Wey House, Alton, Hants
Emma Isabel Redding Mrs High St., Alton
Mabel E. Trimmond Miss The Parmont, Alton
M. L. Bedding Miss High St., Alton, Hants
Eliza Little Mrs High Street, Alton, Hants
Louisa Trimbrell Mrs High Street, Alton, Hants
M. Conduit Mrs Regent House, Alton, Hants
E. M. Green Miss Regent House, Alton, Hants
Elizabeth J, Castle Mrs High St., Alton
L. Eleanor Faith Miss High St., Alton
Gertrude E. Burrell Mrs Brooklands, Alton
Theodosia Hanson Miss Alton, Hants
Mildred E. Trimmer Miss The Pavement, Alton, Hants
Helen Mary Hall Mrs Brook House, Alton, Hants
Ellen Osborn Miss RosebankSchool, Alton, Hants
Emily Piggott Mrs West End, Alton, Hants
Louisa Dyer Mrs Ivy House, Alton, Hants
Alice M. Dyer Miss Ivy House, Alton, Hants
Bessie Farthing Mrs Westfield, Alton
Florence C. Farthing Miss Westfield, Alton
Bertha Leslie Mrs Alton, Hants
Annie Laura Dyer Mrs Hill House, Alton
Mary Hanna Petar Miss Weybourne, Alton, Hants
Selina Petar Miss Weybourne, Alton, Hants
H. Katie Wilkman Mrs Alton, Hants
Frances J. Chalcraft Mrs Anstey Lodge, Alton, Hants
Millicent Chalcraft Miss Anstey, Alton, Hants
Katharine S. Fell Mrs Worldham Rectory, Alton, Hants
Annie Moule Mrs High Street, Alton

On the inside back cover the collector of signatures was ask to sign, giving name and address in testimony of the authenticity of the contents.

Mrs Sophia Emma Wickham, 60,[2] was the wife of William Wickham, esq, chairman of the County Magistrates for Alton Petty Sessional Division, who according to the 1891 Census was ‘living on his own means and a magistrate’.[3] Katharine Fell, 49, was the wife of Reverend George Hunter Fell, 72, vicar of East and West Worldham.[4]

The booklet is interesting in that it gives an indication that there was a women working for extension of the franchise to women in Alton and district in 1893 and that by mischance it was not sent to Central Office. It may be possible to identify the ladies using the 1891 Census and Kelly’s Directory for Hampshire.

Source:

Hampshire Record Office HRO 38M49/D9/29. Printed booklet, ‘Women’s Suffrage: An appeal from women’ belonging to Sophia Wickham, 1894.


[1]    The Committee was composed of: President: Mrs. Fawcett. Treasurer: Mrs. Frank Morrison. Members: The Lady Frances Balfour, Miss Balfour, Miss Helen Blackburn, Mrs. Leonard Courtney, The Lady Knightley, Mrs. Eva McLaren, Mrs. Massingberd, Miss Mordan, Mrs. Wynford Philipps, Mrs. Broadley Reid, The Lady Henry Somerset, Mrs. T. Taylor (Chipchase), Miss Vernon. Secretary: Miss Julia Cameron.

[2]    Age given after the names is the age in 1893 calculated from the age given in the census consulted.

[3]    Kelly’s Directory of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, 1895, 28. TNA: PRO RG12/952/24/2. Binsted, Hants.

[4]    Kelly’s Directory of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, 1895, 574. TNA PRO RG11/1247/74/14. East Worldham, Hants.

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Campaigning For The Vote: Book Launch Invitation

An invitation to those interested in Kate Frye – and the Women’s Suffrage Movement.

RSVP essential

Invitation

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Women Writers and Italy: Two Englishwomen In Rome and Sarah Parker Remond

Anne ( 1841-1928) and Matilda Lucas (1849-1943) were the daughters of  Samuel Lucas, a brewer with land and influence in Hitchin, Hertfordshire. The Lucas family were Quakers. Their mother had died when they were young and after their father’s death in 1870 the sisters continued to live for a short time with their step-mother. But then, in mid-1871, they left England for Rome, where,  for the next 29 years, they were to spend much of the year. Ten years after her sister’s death, Matilda Lucas published excerpts from the letters sent over the years by the sisters to friends and relations back in England. Two Englishwomen in Rome, 1871-1900 (Methuen, 1938)  makes very interesting reading.

Sarah Parker Remond c. 1865 (Courtesy Peabody Essex Museum Collection)

Sarah Parker Remond c. 1865 (Courtesy Peabody Essex Museum Collection)

The few disingenuous sentences I transcribe below would appear to delineate the discomfort that must have been endured by  Sarah Parker Remond (1824-94) , or Sarah Remond Pintor as she was by then, as she mixed in society – even  expatriate Roman society, which was by no means ruled by convention. An American free-born black woman, Sarah Remond had lived for a time in London, signing the first women’s suffrage petition in 1866, perhaps the only black woman to do so, had then travelled to Italy, where she qualified as a doctor. She had married an Italian, Lazzaro Pintor in Florence in 1877. There is some debate as to how long the marriage lasted. From the Lucas’ evidence, Pintor did not accompany his wife to this social occasion in Rome in March 1878, but Sarah was sufficiently still married to feel able to don her bridal dress.

However am I correct, I wonder, to read the passage as reflecting the curiosity and, perhaps,  also slight discomfort  felt by the gathering at the presence of a black woman in their midst? If Sarah was their aunt the P___s must surely have been the  ‘Putnams’ – the family of Sarah’s sister, Caroline Remond Putnam, who lived with her in Italy on various occasions. If so the fact that Caroline also was ‘black’ makes the passage a little difficult to interpret. Why was Sarah specifically their ‘black aunt’? Did they have any other kind? So perhaps it was only the bridal dress that was the cause for comment. A simple scene, but something of a puzzle.

March 17, 1878. Tell Madgie that the P___s were there with their black aunt. She was a bride, having just married an Italian, and wore her bridal dress of grey silk. It must have been very trying for Mrs P____. People came up to question her. One Italian said, ‘Chi e quell’Africana?’  It appears that she is very clever, and a female doctor. She was taken up a good deal in London by different people who were interested in negroes. I think she lived with the Peter Taylors. She has given lectures. I went to sit on the sofa with her, to the amusement of Franz, who cannot rise above her appearance. Dr Baedtke was much impressed to think that anyone has had the courage to marry her, and said, ‘In that I should have been a coward.’

Click here for Sarah Parker Remond: A Daughter of Salem, Massachusetts  – a very interesting website

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Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Gallery At The UNISON Centre

The Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Gallery at the UNISON Centre tells the story of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, of the hospital she built, and of women’s struggle to achieve equality in the field of medicine.

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson when young

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836-1917) was determined to do something worthwhile with her life. In 1865 she qualified as a doctor. This was a landmark achievement.  She was the first woman to overcome the obstacles created by the medical establishment to ensure it remained the preserve of men.

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson then helped other women into the medical profession, founding the New Hospital for Women where women patients were treated only by women doctors.

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, by her example, demonstrated that a woman could be a wife and mother as well as having a professional career.

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson worked to achieve equality for women, being especially active in the campaigns for higher education and ‘votes for women’.

In the early 1890s the New Hospital for Women (later renamed the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital) was built  on the Euston Road and continued to treat women until 2000. For some years this building then lay derelict until a campaign by ‘EGA for Women’ won it listed status. UNISON has now carefully restored the building, bringing it back to life as part of the UNISON Centre.

Two important rooms in the original 1890 hospital building have been dedicated to the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Gallery. One is the

ORIGINAL ENTRANCE HALL

of the hospital which has been carefully restored to its original form. Here you can study an album, compiled specially for the Gallery, telling the history of the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in words and pictures, while, in the background you can listen to a soundscape evocative of hospital life. This is  interwoven with the reminiscences of hospital patients, snippets from the letters of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and sundry other sounds to stimulate your imagination.

The main gallery

The main gallery

The other Gallery room is what was known when the hospital opened as

THE MEDICAL INSTITUTE

This was a room, running along the front of the hospital, parallel to Euston Road, set aside for all women doctors, from all over the country, at a time when they were still barred from the British Medical Association. It was intended as a space in which they could meet, talk and keep up with the medical journals.

Here you can use a variety of media to follow the story of women, work and co-operation in the 19th and 20th centuries.

A BACK-LIT GRAPHIC LECTERN RUNS AROUND THE MAIN GALLERY:

allowing you to see in words and pictures a quick overview of the life of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and of her hospital.

 

AT INTERVALS ARE SET SIX INTERACTIVE TOUCH-SCREEN MONITORS

-named –  Ambition, Perseverance, Leadership, Equality, Power in Numbers and Making Our Voices Heard – allowing you to access more information about Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, about the social and political conditions that have shaped her world and ours, and about the building’s new occupant – UNISON..

Each monitor contains:

TWO SHORT VIDEO SEGMENTS.

‘Elizabeth’s Story’. Follow the video from screen to screen. Often speaking her own words, the video uses images and voices to tell the story of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson’s life.

‘UNISON Now’ UNISON members tell you what the union means to them.

and four

INTERACTIVES 

‘Campaigns for Justice’ and ‘Changing Lives’.

 Touch the screen icons to discover how life in Britain has changed since the birth of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson.

 AMBITION

Campaigns for justice

Victorian Britain: a society in flux

Victorian democracy: who could vote, and who couldn’t

Did a woman have rights?

Workers organised

Changing lives

The people’s lives in Victorian Britain

The medical profession before Elizabeth Garrett

Restricted lives, big ambitions: middle-class women in the Victorian era

Women workers in the first half of the 19th century

PERSEVERANCE

Campaigns for justice

The changing political landscape

Widening the franchise: can we trust the workers?

Women want to vote: the beginnings of a movement

Trade unions become trade unions

Changing lives

A new concept of active government: Victorian social reform

Women as nurses and carers

Living a life that’s never been lived before: women attempt to enter medicine

International pioneers: women study medicine abroad

LEADERSHIP

Campaigns for justice

Contagious Diseases Acts

Trade unions broaden their vision

Women and education

Women trade unionists

Changing lives

The middle-class century

Working women in the second half of the 19th century

Social reform, philanthropy and paternalism

Women doctors for India

EQUALITY

 Campaigns for justice

The women’s suffrage movement

The Taff Vale decision hampers the unions

The founding of the Labour party

The People’s Budget

Changing lives

Work and play

Marylebone and Somers Town

Did the working classes want a welfare state?

1901 – Who were the workers in the NewHospital for Women?

POWER IN NUMBERS

Campaigns for justice

The General Strike – 1926

The first Labour governments

Feminist campaigns between the wars

1901: The lives of working women in London

Changing lives

Work of women doctors in the First World War

Can we afford the doctor? Health services before the NHS

Wartime demand for social justice

The creation of the National Health Service 1945-1948

MAKING OUR VOICES HEARD

Campaigns for justice

Equality campaigns

Public sector unions before UNISON

UNISON brings public service workers together

Are trade unions still relevant?

Changing lives

The National Health Service becomes sacrosanct

Did the welfare state change the family?

Women’s equality today

Women in medicine now

 

IN THE CENTRE OF THE GALLERY YOU WILL FIND:

ENTERPRISING WOMEN

 an interactive table containing short biographies of over 100 women renowned for their achievements in Britain in the 19th-21st centuries. Up to four visitors can use the table at any one time.  Drag a photograph towards the edge of the table to discover details of that individual’s life. Or search by name or vocation, using the alphabetical or subject lists.

 

ON THE WALLS OF THE GALLERY

PROJECTIONS

show a changing display of pictures of the hospital as it was and of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and some of the other women whose stories the Gallery tells.

 

Garrett LaburnumTHE GARRETT CORNER

is designed in the style associated with the work of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson’s sister, the architectural decorator Agnes Garrett, who was in charge of the original interior decoration of the hospital in 1890. The Gallery’s fireplace is the only surviving example of Agnes Garrett’s work. Next to this hangs a length of wallpaper, ‘Garrett Laburnum’, re-created from one of her designs.

In the Garrett Corner a display case and a low table contain a small collection of objects relevant to Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, the hospital and early women doctors.

While here do sit down and browse the library of books. These relate to the history of women – in society, in medicine, in the workplace, and in trade unions  – and to the Somers Town area.

 

Plaque commemorating a substantial donation to the hospital by Henry Tate, industrialist and philanthropist

Plaque commemorating a substantial donation to the hospital by Henry Tate, industrialist and philanthropist

ACROSS FROM THE GARRETT CORNER IS A DISPLAY OF CERAMIC PLAQUES

Decorative plaques that used to hang beside patients’ beds, each commemorating a donor’s generosity.

You can read in detail about the work of the Garrett family in the fields of medicine, education, interior design, landscape design, citizenship and material culture in Elizabeth Crawford, Enterprising Women: the Garretts and their circle, published by Francis Boutle Publishers, £25. The book can be bought direct from womanandhersphere.com or click here to buy from the publisher

DO VISIT:

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Gallery at the UNISON Centre

130 Euston Road

London NW1 2AY

Telephone: 0800 0 857 857

Open Wednesday to Friday 9.00am to 6.00pm

and the third Saturday of every month 9.00am to 4.00pm 

Admission Free

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Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary: ‘Campaigning for the Vote’ Is Here

Kate Frye coverHere is the front cover of Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary –   published by Francis Boutle Publishers

The key points about the book are:

  •  Drawn from a new primary source, Campaigning for the Vote tells, in her own words, the efforts of Kate Frye, a working suffragist, to convert the men and women of England to the cause of women’s suffrage. The detailed diary Kate kept all her life (1878-1959) has been edited to cover 1911-1915, years she spent as a paid organiser for the New Constitutional Society for Women’s Suffrage.
  • No other diary gives such an extensive account of the working life of a suffragist, one who had an eye for the grand tableau – such as following Emily Wilding Davison’s cortége through the London streets – as well as the minutiae of producing an advertisement for a village meeting.
  • With Kate for company we can experience the reality of the ‘votes for women’ campaign as, day after day, in London and in the provinces, she knocks on doors, arranges meetings, trembles on platforms, speaks from carts in market squares, village greens, and seaside piers, enduring indifference, incivility and even the threat of firecrackers under her skirt.
  • Kate’s words bring to life the world of the itinerant organiser – a world of train journeys, of complicated luggage conveyance, of hotels – and hotel flirtations – , of boarding houses, of landladies, and of the ‘quaintness’ of fellow boarders. This was not a world to which she was born, for her years as an organiser were played out against the catastrophic loss of family money and enforced departure from a much-loved home. Before 1911 Kate had had the luxury of giving her time as a volunteer to the suffrage cause; now she depended on it for her keep.
  • Kate Frye gives us the fullest account to date of the workings of the previously shadowy New Constitutional Society for Women’s Suffrage. She writes at length of her fellow workers, never refraining from discussing their egos and foibles.
  • After the outbreak of war in August 1914 Kate continued to work for some time at the society’s headquarter, helping to organize its war effort, while allowing us to experience her reality of life in war-time London.
  • Campaigning for the Vote is over 200pp long and contains over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive. ISBN 978 1903427 75 0 £14.99
  • Advance orders may be placed either with me or with the publisher – or with any good bookshop.
'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers

‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

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Suffrage Stories: Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary, The Royal Albert Hall, And The Importance of Gas

photo 4The Royal Albert Hall was the scene of many grand suffrage occasions – organised by both the constitutional and the militant suffrage societies. The management of the Hall has recognised this by supporting its archivists in mounting a small display relating to its suffrage past. The display may be viewed by anyone with a ticket to an event in the hall.

Researchers use the primary sources available and Suzanne Keyte, Project Archivist at the Royal Albert Hall, has mined what is known as the Hall’s  ‘Gas Book’ to recreate a list of occasions on which the Hall was rented for suffrage-related meetings. The ‘Gas Book’ records the amount of cubic feet used each time the Hall was let for a concert or a political or a religious meeting and, with certain provisos, can be used as an  indication of the size of the audience.

Kate Frye witnessed several grand suffrage occasions in the Hall. Here she describes an evening stewarding for the London Society for Women’s Suffrage at a Mass Meeting of suffrage societies in support of the Conciliation Bill

Albert HallSaturday November 12th 1910

I sat and sewed a red, green and white scarf for the evening. We had tea at 4.15 and I had a rush to dress and take Mickie [her dog] out and get off by soon after 5 o’clock. I was due at the Albert Hall at 5.30. Was given a job to do till 6.30 – or rather before – when we all went to our posts. Mine was Balcony – selling of programmes and ‘Common Causes’ [the NUWSS newspaper]  & helping with the collections. The hall looked lovely – the banners were so beautifully arranged – but it wasn’t so full as I should have liked. The W.S.P.U. had a crowded meeting on Thursday and collected £8,000. Wonderful people one simply cannot hear from the Balcony. Mrs Swanwick was the only one I could really hear – her elocution is marvellous. It was so interesting seeing all the Societies – but [ie except for] the W.S.P.U. there – such lots of colours & badges – and I got very chatsome to some of my companions upstairs from the different societies.Albert Hall 1

When the meeting was nearly over I went down to the hall & tried to sell ‘Common Cause’. Old Major General Sir Alfred Turner, who was sporting around with Adeline Bourne, bought one of me with a beam and a handful of coin – he is a joke. It had come on to pour with rain and the Wrights insisted on bringing me as far as their place in their Taxi which was kind. ‘

The Hall’s  ‘Gas Book’ shows that for this meeting the NUWSS consumed – and were charged for – 47,800 cubic feet of gas.  On this November night one imagines that it would have been necessary to have lit all the Hall’s lamps. In fact,  on 19 March 1908, when Kate Frye attended the first WSPU meeting to be held in the Albert Hall, that night’s gas consumption had been very similar- 46,800 cubic feet (click here to see Kate’s description of that meeting). From this idiosyncratic source we can deduce that the NUWSS did not lag behind the WSPU in ensuring that their evening meetings were brilliantly lit, even though, from Kate’s account, they were not necessarily able to muster as large an audience.

There was something to be said for staging meetings in the Albert Hall on summer evenings. For at the meeting held there that marked the finale to the NUWSS’s procession through London on 13 June 1908, gas consumption was only 16,000 cubic feet.  We know when the meeting started because Kate Frye carefully noted in her diary that, after marching from the Embankment in the rearguard position which the Kensington branch had been allotted, she reached the Albert Hall at 5.10, just as the meeting was about to begin.  Clearly less artificial illumination was required for a meeting held on an early evening in summer than for one in the winter, thereby reducing at least one element of the cost. (See here for the entry from Kate’s diary describing the procession).

Suzanne Keyte has identified c 30 suffrage meetings that were held at the Royal Albert Hall. By June 1913, however, after pressure had been exerted on hall owners throughout the country, the management of the Hall decided that they would refuse the WSPU any further lettings. What was in effect their last  meeting had taken place a couple of months earlier, on 10 April.

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops. In stock at London Review of Books Bookshop, Foyles, National Archives Bookshop.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

 

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Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary: Palmist At The Women’s Freedom League Bazaar

WFL BazaarBy 1909 Kate Frye was keenly involved – as a volunteer – in the women’s suffrage campaign. Although she belonged to the constitutional London Society for Women’s Suffrage she was happy to give her services to other, more militant,  suffrage societies – such as the Women’s Freedom League.

Dramatis Personae for these entries

Marie Lawson (1881-1975) was a leading member of the WFL. An effective businesswoman, in 1909 she formed the Minerva Publishing Co. to produce the WFL’s weekly paper, The Vote.

May Whitty (1865-1948) and Ben Webster (1864-1947) were a well-established theatrical coupleKate had toured with May Whitty in a production of J.M. Barrie’s Quality Street in 1903.

Ellen Terry (1847-1928) the leading Shakesperean actress of her age.

Edith Craig (1869-1947) theatre director, producer, costume designer, and a very active member of the Actresses’ Franchise League.  She staged a number of spectacles for suffrage societies, working particularly closely with the Suffrage Atelier and the Women’s Freedom League. In January 1912 Kate appeared in Edith Craig’s production of The Coronation.

Lena Ashwell (1862-1957) actress, manager of the Kingsway Theatre, a vice-president of the Actresses’ Franchise League and a tax resister.

Thursday April 15th 1909 [The Plat, Bourne End]

I went up to London at 9.50 all in my best. Went to Smiths to leave the books – then straight from Praed St to St James Park by train and to the Caxton Hall for the 1st day of the Women’s Freedom League Bazaar. Got there about 11.30  – everything in an uproar, of course. I had to find out who was in authority over me and where I was to go to do my Palmistry. I had to find a Miss Marie Lawson first and then was taken to a lady who had charge of my department and she arranged where I was to go. A most miserable place it seemed – in a gallery overlooking the refreshment room. I meant to have gone out to have a meal first – but it all took me so long running about getting an extra chair etc that I should have missed the opening. Then another Palmist hurried up – the real thing who donned a red robe. I was jealous. Madame Yenda.

Kate kept Madame La Yenda's card within the pages of her diary

Kate kept Madame Yenda’s card within the pages of her diary

We got on very well, however, and exchanged cards (I have had some printed) it was all about as funny as anything I have ever done and I have had some experiences.

Then I went back to the main room which was beginning to get thronged and stifling from the smell of flash- light photographs. I discovered Miss May Whitty and Mr Ben Webster and chatted to them while we waited for Miss Ellen Terry who was half an hour late. Miss Whitty was awfully nice and I quite enjoyed meeting her again. Ellen Terry looked glorious in 15th century costume and was very gay and larkish. Her daughter Edith Craig was there to look after and prompt her – and ‘mother’ her – what a mother to have had. I expect she had to pay for it. She is a sweet-looking woman with a most clever face – only a tiny shade of her Mother in it but Ellen Terry took the shine out of everyone – what a face to be sure. When she went round the stalls I went to the Balcony and for a little time Madame Yenda and I tried to work up there together but it was impossible. All my clients had to disturb her as they walked to and fro so at last I came out to find 3 more Palmists waiting and nowhere for them to work. One, a real professional, was very cross especially at the small fee being charged and I don’t think she could have been there long. Two other girls, looking real amateurs, were also there. So I sat a while at a table outside and told a few but it wasn’t very satisfactory and at 2 o’clock I went out for some lunch leaving the four others there. I went into a Lyons place in Victoria Street and then went back a little before 3 o’clock meaning to have a look round the Bazaar but I was pounced on to begin again and I was alone at it all the afternoon from 3 till 5.45 up in the gallery. I was left at it with sometimes just a few minutes in between but must have told 40 hands I should say. I did about 7 or 8 before 2 o’clock. We were only supposed to give 10 minutes at the outside but I could not quite limit myself and sometimes, when there wasn’t a rush, I had long talks with the people. It was very interesting and on the whole I think I was successful. Train to Praed St and to Smiths for the books and home by the 6.45.

 Friday April 16th 1909 [The Plat, Bourne End]

Ribbon from the WFL Bazaar carefully preserved by Kate

Ribbon from the WFL Bazaar carefully preserved by Kate

I went straight to Caxton Hall by train from Praed St to St James’s Park – left some flowers at the flower stall. Mother had packed up some lovely bunches for me. Then I went up to the l[ondon] S[ociety] for W[omen’s] S[uffrage] office on business connected with the Demonstration – then back to the Caxton Hall for the opening of the Green White and Gold Fair on the second day. Miss Lena Ashwell was punctual 12 o’clock and she looked delicious and did it all so nicely. Madame Yenda was there but no other Palmists. My chatty friend, who greeted me rapturously, helped fix up the gallery a much nicer place – but clients did not come very early -they were all following Lena Ashwell – so I had 1/- from Madame Yenda myself. I think she was clever but, of course, I am rather a hard critic at it. She told me a great many things I know to be absolutely true and she gave me some good advice especially about morbid introspective thoughts and I think she is quite right. I do over worry. I am to beware of scandal which is all round me just now. She predicts a broken engagement, a rich alliance and always heaps of money. I should have immense artistic success in my profession if only I had more confidence in myself and if only I had some favourable influence (a sort of back patter, I take it) to help me but such an influence is far away. I shall never live a calm uneventful existence. I shall always spend so much of myself with and for others. I am rather glad of that. I was just beginning to tell her her hand but I wouldn’t let her pay as she told me she was very poor and I could see it when some clients came for us both and we both had to start our work.

I didn’t feel a bit inclined for work at first but got into it and had wonderful success. Kept on till 2 o’clock – went to the Army and Navy Stores then and had some fish for lunch – then back – saw the ‘Prison Cell’ for 5 and was very interested – then started work at 2.45 and never moved off my chair till 6.15. I did have an afternoon of it. Madame Yenda had gone and I was alone in my glory. I must have had quite another 40 people if not more and they were waiting in line to come in to me. I seem to delight some of the people and one or two said I quite made them believe in Palmistry. One old lady came back for another shill’oth [shilling’s worth] as I had been so good with her past and present she wanted her future. I must have been very clairvoyant as I told the people extraordinary things sometimes and they said I was ‘true’. Of course one or two I could not make much headway with but that must always be so.

Where I found I had missed my train I wanted to go on but my chatty friend was really awfully decent and would not hear of it. She said if I would tell one man who had been waiting ever so long that was all I must do and she would send the others away. There were about 18 waiting and she did – rather to my relief. I felt ‘done’

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops. In stock at London Review of Books Bookshop, Foyles, National Archives Bookshop.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

 

You can listen here to a talk I gave in the House of Commons – ‘Campaigning for the Vote: From MP’s Daughter to Suffrage Organiser: the diary of Kate Parry Frye’.

Copyright

All the articles on Woman and Her Sphere and are my copyright. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without my permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement.

 

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Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary: The Mud March, 9 February 1907

Kate Frye had first joined a suffrage society in the spring of 1906.  Her choice was the Central Society for Women’s Suffrage (later renamed the London Society for Women’s Suffrage) – a constituent society of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies  Interest in the long-running women’s suffrage campaign leapt ahead in the following few months and in February 1907 the NUWSS staged the first open-air suffrage spectacular – a march through the wintry, muddy London streets. For obvious reasons this became known as the ‘Mud March’. Kate’s estimate of 3000 participants accords with later reports.

Saturday 9 February 1907 [25 Arundel Gardens, North Kensington]


Mud MarchIn bed for breakfast – and what was my utter disgust – and disappointment – to hear the torrents of rain – and there was not a shadow of its coming last night – it was bitterly cold. As it was so heavy I hoped it would stop – but it went on and on into a fine heavy drizzle. They said I should be mad to go in the procession and though I knew I must – I went out at 12.30 taking Mickie a walk and sent a telegram to Alexandra Wright telling her the rain prevented my joining them. I had arranged to be at their house at 1 o’clock and go with them to Hyde Park. We all had lunch. I knew I was going all the time – but couldn’t go. Off to wash my hands. 2 o’clock. ‘They will be just starting’, said I. Then as I washed I made up my mind I would go rain or no rain and – lo – the rain had ceased. I prepared a plan to Agnes.  She too knew she was to be of it – both flew upstairs and were out of the house before 2.15.

We tore to Notting Hill Gate – meaning to go the quickest way. No motor bus – so we tore for the train – it came in as I started to race down. In we scrambled – had to change at South Kensington much to our disgust – but we were not kept long. We flew out at Charing Cross and up Villiers Street. No sign of the Procession of Women Suffragists in the Strand. They were timed to leave Hyde Park at 2 o’clock so I had to pluck up my courage and ask a policeman. No, they had not passed. So, knowing the route, we flew up as far as Piccadilly Circus and there in about 2 minutes we heard strains of a band and waited, anxious and expectant. The crowd began to gather and we were nearly swept away by the first part – a swarm of roughs with the band – but the procession itself came – passed along dignified and really impressive. It was a sight I wouldn’t have missed for anything – and I was glad to have the opportunity of seeing it as well as taking part in it.

Mud March 1We stood right in front so as not to miss our contingent – and I asked if they knew where it was. Miss Gore Booth said it was coming and we were fearfully excited and I was so anxious not to miss our lot. I shrieked out when I saw Miss Doake’s red head in the distance and we dashed up to them and asked if we could join in. Alexandra carried our banner. Mrs Wright said come along here – it felt like boarding an express train but I suppose it was a quite simple rally though I cannot look back on it as that – but we were so excited and so anxious not to miss them. We walked three abreast – Miss Doake, Agnes and I – I was on the kerb side – behind us Gladys [Wright], Miss Ellis and Mrs Doake. North Kensington was not very well represented but I really do not know who else of us was there.

Then the real excitement started. The crowds to see us – the man in the street – the men in the Clubs, the people standing outside the Carlton – interested – surprised for the most part – not much joking at our expense and no roughness. The policemen were splendid and all the traffic was stopped our way. We were an imposing spectacle all with badges – each section under its own banners. Ours got broken, poor thing, unfortunately, and caused remarks. I felt like a martyr of old and walked proudly along. I would not jest with the crowd – though we had some jokes with ourselves. It did seem an extraordinary walk and it took some time as we went very slowly occasionally when we got congested – but we went in one long unbroken procession. There were 3000 about I believe. At the end came ever so many carriages and motor cars – but of course we did not see them. Lots of people we knew drove.

Flyer advertising the NUWSS 'Mud March'

Flyer advertising the NUWSS ‘Mud March’

Up the Strand it was a great crowd watching – some of the remarks were most amusing. ‘Here comes the class’ and two quite smart men standing by the kerb ‘I say look at those nice girls – positively disgraceful I call it.’ Then ‘Ginger hair – dark hair – and fair hair’ ‘Oh! What nice girls’ to Miss Doake, Agnes and I. Several asked if we had brought our sweethearts and made remarks to express their surprise at our special little band. ‘All the prizes in this lot’ etc. The mud was awful. Agnes and I wore galoshes so our feet were alright but we got dreadfully splashed. It was quite a business turning into the Exeter Hall. A band was playing merrily all the time – the one which had led the procession – and there was one not far off us. Three altogether, I was told.

Exeter Hall in 1905

Exeter Hall in 1905

We got good seats and of course had to wait some time before the meeting started – it was just after 4 pm when it did – but there was a ladies’ orchestra performing and playing very well and a lady at the organ in between whiles. The meeting was splendid. Mr Walter McLaren in the Chair and Israel Zangwill as chief speaker – he was so splendid and most witty. Miss Gore Booth – Mrs Fawcett – Mrs Eva McLaren – Lady Strachey and several other ladies spoke and Keir Hardie made an excellent speech. It was altogether a wonderful and memorable afternoon – and felt we were making history – but after all I don’t know, I am sure, what will come of it. The MPs seem to have cheated and thoroughly ‘had’ us all over it. They wanted the Liberal Women’s help to get into the House and now they don’t care two straws or they are frightened of us. We walked up to Tottenham Court Road and came home by bus. It was nearly 7 o’clock when we got in. .. I felt bitterly tired all the evening after the excitement.

Dramatis Personae for this entry

Agnes, Kate’s elder sister

Mickie, Kate’s beloved dog

Alexandra and her sister, Gladys, lived at 10 Linden Gardens. It was under their influence that Kate had joined the London Society for Women’s Suffrage.

Violette Mary Doake (b 1888) her parents were Irish, which may account for the red hair. Her mother, Mary Elizabeth Doake, was also a suffragist. Her father, Richard Baxter Doake, described in the 1911 census as a ‘tea planter’, was elected as a Progressive party member in 1892 to the LCC seat relinquished by Frederick Frye. In 1901 the Doakes lived at 24 Stanley Gardens, close to the Fryes. By 1911 they had moved to 25 Ladbroke Gardens.

Walter McLaren and his wife, Eva were members of a family of long-standing supporters of women’s suffrage. He had been Liberal MP for Crewe in the 1890s and regained the seat in 1910.

Israel Zangwill, Jewish novelist and very effective writer and speaker in support of women’s suffrage

Lady Strachey had worked for women’s suffrage since the 1860s. She remarked that after this march she had to boil her skirt.

Keir Hardie,  first Independent Labour Party MP. He had strongly supported a motion in favour of women’s suffrage at the Labour party conference on 26 January

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com (£14.99), or from all good bookshops.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers

‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

Campaigning for the Vote– Front and back cover of wrappers

 You can also listen here to a Radio 4 programme as Anne McElvoy and I follow the route of the ‘Mud March’.

Copyright

All the articles on Woman and Her Sphere are my copyright. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without my permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement.

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Am I Not A Woman And A Sister: Women and the Anti-Slavery Campaign

Am I Not a Woman and a Sister: women and the anti-slavery campaign

‘Am I not a woman and a sister’ reads the legend arching over the female figure of Justice as she reaches towards a kneeling black slave woman, who holds her chained hands up in supplication. In the 1830s this powerful emblem was used on printed matter and on artifacts associated with women-only, or ‘ladies’, anti- slavery associations. It very consciously echoed the motto, ‘Am I Not a Man and a Brother’, adopted in 1787 by the founders of the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. Throughout the long years of abolitionist campaigning women were always participants, their role becoming, over the years, increasing prominent. Experience gained in a movement of such social, economic and political importance was to prove valuable when, in the 1860s, they launched the campaign to gain their own political freedom.

In 1787, however, women could take no direct part in politics, their role confined to that of exercising influence on those who did have political power. One such woman was Lady Middleton, a member of the evangelical Clapham Sect, who conducted a country-house salon at Barham Court in Kent. It was she who, according to Thomas Clarkson, in 1786 persuaded both William Wilberforce and himself to take up the anti-slavery cause. Lady Middleton’s own interest in the subject was not new. In 1782 she had been among the subscribers to Letters of Late Ignatius Sancho, the first prose work by an African to be published in England. Ignatius Sancho, born on a slave ship, had, as a child, been a house slave in London, at Greenwich.

Women’s influence extended to rather more than cajolery over the dinner table. Another member of the Clapham Sect, Lady Middleton’s close friend the writer Hannah More, was asked, in late 1787, to write a poem to draw attention to the discussion soon to take place in Parliament. She quickly composed Slavery, a Poem, published as a large, handsomely printed, 20-page book. She was just one of many women writers who wielded their pens in the abolitionist cause. Although they did not have direct power women could exercise their influence through the medium considered most suitable to their sex, poetry.

Women were also a valuable source of the finance necessary for the funding of the campaign. Although the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was formed and officered by men, there was no attempt to prevent women from becoming subscribers. Subscriptions ranged from one to five guineas, sizeable sums, indicating that those donating were drawn from the middling to wealthy section of society. Fortunately for us, the Society printed a report listing by name all its subscribers. Women clearly had no more qualms at having their names listed in such a quasi-political publication than they did in appearing as subscribers to a novel or volume of poetry. It is possible, therefore, to study the names of 206 women, comprising about ten per cent of the total, who in the late-18th century made public their condemnation of the slave trade.

The main, London-based, committee attracted members from all around the country. It is noticeable that there are few obviously upper-class or aristocratic women on the list. Only three titled ladies subscribed: Lady Hatton of Longstanton, the Dowager Countess Stanhope (who gave £50), and the Dowager Viscountess Galway. A superficial investigation would indicate that all three were women associated with families with radical sympathies. Indeed the Dowager Countess Stanhope’s son, who had succeeded her husband as earl, was soon to style himself ‘Citizen Stanhope’ to demonstrate his support for revolution in France. Two others of those listed, ‘Miss Pelham and Miss Mary Pelham of Esher’ were members of an influential Whig family, counting a former prime minister amongst their forebears.

The names of some subscribers have entered the literary canon. Prominent are Elizabeth Carter (writer and ‘blue stocking’), Sarah Trimmer (evangelical educationalist and writer) and Mary Scott of Milborne Port, Dorset, who in 1774 had written a lengthy poem, The Female Advocate, in which she drew attention to Phillis Wheatley, the first slave and black woman to have a book of poetry published in Britain.

Phillis Wheatley, as depicted on the frontispiece to her ‘Poems on Various Subjects’

Information can, with some application, be teased out about many of the other names on the list. A quick Google search reveals that, at random,’ Mrs Elizabeth Prowse of Wicken Park, Northampton’ was the sister of Granville Sharp, a leading member of the Abolition Committee. That ‘Mrs Peckard, Cambridge’ was, probably Martha, the wife of Peter Peckard, vice chancellor of Cambridge University and a preacher of sermons against the slave trade. It was he who, he in 1785 had set the question, ‘Is it lawful to make slaves of others against their will?’, for the University’s Latin essay won by Thomas Clarkson, the first step in his abolitionist career.

Through the Will Search facility at DocumentsOnline on the National Archives website it is possible to read the wills of some of the subscribers and discover a little more about their lives. For example, ‘Mary Belch, Ratcliffe’ was a corn chandler of Broad Street, Ratcliffe, in east London and ‘Deborah Townsend, Smithfield Bars’ was either the wife or the daughter of a Smithfield grocer. The wills may not reveal much about their abolitionist sympathies but they do demonstrate that women from this sector of society were committed to the cause.

The will of another subscriber, ‘Elizabeth Freeman, Woodbridge’, reveals that she was a Quaker and that she left ‘to my poor relations in America twenty pounds to be disposed of by friends of the Monthly Meeting in North Carolina’. It might be presumed that with these connections she knew something of conditions in an American slave state. Further research might indicate that other women subscribers from Woodbridge were also Quakers. Some names, of course, do indicate clear Quaker connections. Five female member of the well-known Fox family of Falmouth were subscribers and, with their fellow Quakers, are likely to be traceable through the records kept by the Society of Friends.

Women were also subscribers to the separate local committees formed in provincial towns. In Manchester 68 out of total of 302 subscribers were women. However few of the names include any indication of address and are, therefore, more difficult to identify. Some were wives of men involved with the Manchester committee. One such was ‘Mrs Bayley of Hope’, wife of Thomas Bayley, Unitarian, JP and penal reformer. Here too many the female subscribers were likely to have been nonconformists, particularly Unitarians and Quakers, a large number having connections with Manchester’s manufacturing interests.

In Bristol, notorious as a slave port, subscribers to the local committee included Miss Anna Goldney and ‘Mrs Goldney’. It has to be remembered that ‘Mrs’ at that time was a title given to unmarried as well as married women and, therefore, that the latter was probably Ann Goldney, who was unmarried and had recently inherited the family’s Clifton estate from her brother. The Goldneys were Quakers although an ancestor, Thomas Goldney, had, in the early 18th century, been the principal investor in a venture leading to the capture of slaves, the family fortune enhanced by investment in the manufacturing of guns for trade with Africa. Between them, Ann and Anna Goldney, a cousin living in the Clifton household, gave a generous six guineas.

Other Bristol women subscribers were Mrs Esther Ash, Mrs Frampton, Mrs Olive and Mrs Merlott, all of whom had at least one other thing in common, being subscribers in 1787 to a translation of Persian poems by Charles Fox. It is likely some were Quakers, but ‘Mrs Merlott’ was probably the unmarried sister of John Merlott, a Presbyterian sugar refiner.

Named women also subscribed to local committees in Birmingham, Exeter, Leeds and Leicester, some of which were probably set up with the encouragement of Thomas Clarkson as he acted as roving ambassador for the Abolition Society. He also organized mass petitions that were such a novelty of this campaign, an early manifestation of the method to be used by popular protest groups throughout the 19th century. Women, however, were not signatories. It was presumably thought that if they were the value of the petition would be diminished.

Women did, though, on occasion take part in public debates about the slave trade. One such was held in 1788 in La Belle Assemblée, a concert hall in Brewer Street, Soho, London, where ‘ladies were permitted to speak in veils’. In 1792 women were also present at a debate at the Coach-makers’ Hall, Foster Lane, Cheapside calling for the boycott of West Indian sugar and rum. The motion was carried by a unanimous vote of 600.

The subject of this latter meeting was one that women were making their own. For, although denied political power, they were able, at least in theory, to influence the economy. As early as 1788 Hannah More had urged a friend ‘to taboo the use of West Indian sugar in your tea’. Women, as chief purchasers of household goods, were encouraged to boycott slave-produced sugar from the West Indies, shopping instead for that grown in the East Indies by free labour. It is thought that by 1791-92 the sugar boycott affected as many as 300,000 people.

As well as redirecting their spending power to ‘free’ produce, women were also encouraged to purchase items that would proclaim their support for the abolitionist cause.

Wedgwood jasper-ware cameo. By courtesy of the Wedgwood Museum Trust, Barlaston, Staffordshire

Thousands of Josiah Wedgwood’s ‘Am I Not a Man and a Brother’ jasperware cameos were incorporated into brooches, bracelets, earrings and hair ornaments, allowing the wearer to indicate sympathy with the abolitionist cause. The ‘kneeling slave’ image was also rendered on a variety of other artefacts and was considered a very suitable subject for young girls to embroider on their samplers.

Women could also buy china bearing anti-slavery messages. The tea table was the sphere of influence particular to the woman of the house and, while entertaining her friends, she could pass round a sugar bowl bearing the motto, ‘East India Sugar not made/By Slaves/By Six families using/East India, instead of/West India Sugar, one/Slave less is required’. By boycotting West Indian sugar and displaying articles such as this she turned herself from a passive consumer into a political activist.

Women were able to demonstrate their sensibility by buying and subscribing to the slim volumes of abolitionist poetry that were finding a popular readership. These were written by women of all sorts and conditions, by, as already noted, the evangelical Hannah More, by her working-class protogée, Ann Yearsley, by Mary Robinson, ex-mistress of the Prince of Wales, and by a succession of young women, such as Mary Birkett of Dublin. Women were also able to educate the younger generation by purchasing works such as The Negro Boy’s Tale: a poem addressed to children, published by Amelia Opie in 1802.

By then, however, the mass popular campaign had collapsed. In 1792 the British public had watched in horror as the French monarchy was overthrown by the mob and, in the same year, slaves in Saint-Domingue (Haiti) rose up against their masters. Whatever its theoretical sympathy with the anti-slavery campaign, the British public had no wish to unleash similar forces. When the act abolishing Britain’s direct involvement in the slave trade was passed in 1807 it was as a result, not of popular protest, but of parliamentary manoeuvrings, in which, of course, women played no part.

There was no further popular agitation against slavery until 1823 when Wilberforce and Clarkson once again took the lead in the formation of the Society for the Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery Throughout the British Dominions. Over the intervening years there had been a decided change in the position of women who now had no inhibition about founding their own anti-slavery societies. The first such was formed in Birmingham in 1825. Here Lucy Townsend, the wife of an Anglican clergyman, worked with a Quaker, Mary Lloyd. Contact was made through their various denominational networks and soon towns such as Manchester, Sheffield, Liverpool, Bristol, Newcastle, York, Southampton and Plymouth, as well as London, supported ladies’ associations. There were also groups in Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

The formation of these societies and the activities they undertook did not escape criticism. Wilberforce expressed what one imagines was a very common view: ‘All private exertions for such an object become their character, but for ladies to meet, to go from house to house stirring up petitions – these appear to me proceedings unsuited to the female character as delineated in Scripture’.

For women were now, indeed, a petitioning force. In the early 1830s hundreds of thousands of women signed petitions. Those presented in 1833 alone bore the signatures of 298,785 women, nearly a quarter of the total. A large number – 187,157 – were on a single petition circulated by the London Female Anti-slavery Society and presented to the House of Commons on 14 May 1833, the day the emancipation bill was produced.

Women were not only, by petitioning, participating in the political process, but were now even questioning the aims of the movement. In 1824 Elizabeth Heyrick, a Leicester Quaker, published a pamphlet, Immediate not Gradual Abolition, calling for immediate emancipation of slaves, in contradistinction to the Anti-Slavery Society’s aim of gradual emancipation. In 1830, at Elizabeth Heyrick’s suggestion, the influential Birmingham women’s society threatened to withdraw its funding from the Anti -Slavery Society if it did not agree to change its aim to immediate abolition. The change was agreed.

Elizabeth Heyrick was also the leader of a new campaign to boycott West Indian produce, especially sugar. Like that of the late-18th century, the 19th-century campaign appealed to the woman of the family to exercise her economic power. In 1828 the Peckham Ladies’ African and Anti-Slavery Association published Reasons for Using east India Sugar, demonstrating to its readers ‘that by substituting east India for west India sugar, they are undermining the system of slavery, in the safest, most easy, and effectual manner, in which it can be done’. ‘If we purchase the commodity, we participate in the crime. The laws of our country may hold the sugar-cane to our lips, steeped in the blood of our fellow-creatures; but they cannot compel us to accept the loathsome potion.’

Women also exercised their talents in order to raise funds for the cause. The bazaar became a particularly womanly form of demonstrating support. As ever, this activity was regarded in some quarters as a waste of effort. In a letter of 22 September 1828 the salon hostess, Mary Clarke Mohl, wrote: ‘My niece spends all her time making little embroidered bags to be sold for the Anti-Slavery Society …which would be all very well if, instead of turning seamstress to gain £10 a year, she put some poor woman in the way of work’.

Only three years after the Anti-Slavery Society had agreed to change its agenda, the 1833 Anti-Slavery Act abolished slavery within the British colonies. Although a period of apprenticeship was imposed on former slaves before they could obtain freedom, a determined effort by the abolitionists led, in 1838, to the early termination of this system. A national women’s petition on behalf of the apprentices addressed to the newly crowned Queen Victoria had carried the signatures of 7000,000 women, a number described as ‘unprecedented in the annals of petitioning’.

Although Britain no longer allowed slavery within its own territories the anti-slavery campaign continued, with the aim of abolishing slavery world wide. In 1840 the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society organized the first World Anti-Slavery Convention. Women delegates, among them a grand-daughter of Lady Middleton, arrived in London from all parts of Britain. From across the Atlantic came women belonging to a section of the US abolitionist movement that wished to combine anti-slavery activity with campaigns for women’s rights. All women were, however, denied participation in the proceedings. As might be expected that decision led not only to a split in the British anti-slavery movement but, indirectly, to the beginning of the US campaign for women’s suffrage. Several of the British women who were barred, women such Elizabeth Nicholls (later Pease), Hannah Webb, Maria Waring, and Matilda Ashurst Biggs, were among those who 26 years later signed the first women’s suffrage petition.

Both factions of the American anti-slavery movement were keen to gain support from British activists and throughout the 1840s and 1850s strong transatlantic links were developed. As in Britain, bazaars became a particular field of endeavour for American abolitionist women, with the British societies keen to supply boxes of goods for sale. In 1846 the Glasgow Society reported that at the Boston Anti-Slavery fair ‘every one of the great plaid shawls sold instantly. The beautiful cloaks sold, and also the bonnets. Aprons do well. The shawls sent by the Duchess of Sutherland sold immediately.’

Sarah Parker Remond

The societies organized lecture tours for members of the American movement. In 1853 the Glasgow Society sponsored Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin had already sold 1.5 million copies in Britain and in 1861 the Edinburgh Society organized a series of lectures by Sarah Remond, whom they described as ‘a lady of colour from America.’ She wrote: ‘I have been received here as the sister of the white woman’.

Even after the ending of the American Civil War and the freeing of slaves in the US, British women’s societies continued their work, concentrating now on providing aid for the ‘Freedmen’. The Birmingham women’s anti-slavery society continued to meet until 1919.

Over the years many of the women’s anti-slavery societies printed reports, listing the members of their committees. It is now possible to study these, together with publications such as the Anti-Slavery Reporter, to discover not only who the women were who worked for this cause, but also to examine the clear links between the members of the abolitionist and of the women’s suffrage movements.

Further Reading

C. Midgley, Women Against Slavery: the British campaigns 1780-1870, Routledge, 1992.

Anti-Slavery International: http://www.antislavery.org .

Wilberforce House Museum, Hull: details of materials relating to the anti-slavery campaign can be found by searching for ‘Wilberforce House’ at http://www.cornucopia.org.uk .

http://www.quaker.org.uk contains an article on the Quaker involvement in the anti-slavery campaign. The library at Friends’ House, London, contains useful biographical records.

BBC History: Elizabeth Crawford, Women: From Abolition to the Vote

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Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary: Spring 1908 – Suffrage Hope – WSPU in Albert Hall ‘a little too theatrical but very wonderful’

Another extract from Kate Frye’s manuscript diary. An edited edition of later entries (from 1911), recording her work as a suffrage organiser, is published as  Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s suffrage diary.

H.Y. Stanger’s Bill, 1908

Kate’s MP, Henry Yorke Stanger, was the promoter of the current Enfranchisement Bill – the latest in the long line that stretched back through the latter half of the 19th century. Despite, as Kate describes, the bill passing its second reading, the government eventually refused to grant facilities to further the debate. However, that blow was yet to come as Kate records in these entries details of the suffrage meetings she attended in February and March 1908. She had the knack of always being present on the great occasions – and on 19 March was in the Albert Hall to witness the rousing – and profitable – reception given to Mrs Pankhurst on her release from prison. 

Dramatis personae:

Miss Harriet Cockle, was 37 years old, an Australian woman of independent means, lving at 34 de Vere gardens, Kensington.

Mrs Philip Snowden – Ethel Snowden (1880-1951) wife of the ILP politician, Philip Snowden.

Mrs Clara Rackham (1875-1966) was regarded as on the the NUWSS’s best speakers. In 1910 she became president of the NUWSS’s Eastern Federation, was founder of the Cambridge branch of the Women’s Co-operative Guild, and was sister-in-law to Arthur Rackham, the book illustrator.

Margery Corbett (1882-1981- later Dame Margery Corbett-Ashby) was the daughter of a Liberal MP. At this time she was secretary of the NUWSS.

Mrs Fanny Haddelsey,wife of a solicitor, lived at 30 St James’s Square, Holland Park.

Mrs Stanbury had been an organiser for NUWSS as far back as 1890s.

Tuesday February 25th 1908 [London-25 Arundel Gardens]

We got home at 5.15 and had tea. Then I did my hair and tidied myself and Agnes and I ate hot fish at 6.30 and left soon after in a downpour of rain for the Kensington Town Hall – we did get wet walking to the bus and afterwards. We got there at 7 o’clock to steward – the doors were opening at 7.30 and the meeting started at 8.15. I was stewarding in the hall downstairs and missed my bag – purse with 6/- and latch Key etc – very early in the evening which rather spoilt the evening for me as I felt sure it had been stolen. It was a South Kensington Committee of the London Society for Woman’s Suffrage and we were stewarding for Miss Cockle. It was a good meeting but not crowded but, then, what a night. Miss Bertha Mason in the Chair. The speech of the evening was Mrs Philip Snowdon, who was great, and Mrs Rackham, who spoke well. The men did not do after them and poor Mr Stanger seemed quite worn out and quoted so much poetry he made me laugh. Daddie had honoured us with his presence for a little time and had sat on the platform – so I feel he has quite committed himself now and will have no right to go back on us. We were not in till 12.20 and then sat some time over our supper.

Wednesday February 26th 1908

Before I was up in the morning Mother came up in my room with my bag and purse and all quite safe. It had been found and the Hall Door Keeper had brought it. I was glad because of the Latch Key. Daddie generously had paid me the 6/- which I was able to return.

Friday February 28th 1908

Mr Stanger’s Woman’s Suffrage Bill has passed the second reading. I had to wait to see the Standard before going to my [cooking] class. That is very exciting and wonderful – but of course we have got this far already in past history. Oh! I would have liked to have been there.

MargWednesday March 11th 1908

To 25 Victoria Street and went to the 1st Speakers Class of the N.[ational] S.[ociety] of W.[omen’s] S.[uffrage]. I was very late getting there and there was no one I knew so I did not take any part in the proceedings and felt very frightened. But Alexandra Wright came in at the end and I spoke to Miss Margery Corbett and our instructoress, Mrs Brownlow. And then I came home with Alexandra from St James’s Park station to Notting Hilll Gate.

Thursday March 12th 1908

Mother went to a Lecture for the NKWLA  [North Kensington Women’s Liberal Association] at the Club and Agnes and I started at 8 o’clock and walked to Mrs Haddesley [sic] for a drawing-room Suffrage Meeting at 8.30. Agnes and I stewarded and made ourselves generally useful. The Miss Porters were there and a girl who I saw at the Speakers’ Class on Wednesday. Alexandra was in the Chair and spoke beautifully – really she did. And Mrs Stanbury spoke. Mrs Corbett and Mrs George – all very good speakers. Mrs Stanbury was really great and there were a lot of questions and a lot of argument after, which made it exciting. It was a packed meeting but some of the people were stodgy. Miss Meade was there with a friend – her first appearance at anything of the kind she told us and she said it was all too much for her to take in all at once. The “class” girl walked with us to her home in HollandPark and we walked on home were not in till 11.45. I was awfully tired and glad of some supper and to get to bed.

Mrs Pankhurst had been arrested on 13 February as she led a deputation from the ‘Women’s Parliament’ in Caxton Hall to the House of Commons. She was released from her subsequent imprisonment on 19 March, going straight to the Albert Hall where the audience waiting to greet her donated £7000 to WSPU funds. Kate was there.

Thursday March 19th 1908

I had a letter in the morning from Miss Madge Porter offering me a seat at the Albert Hall for the evening and of course I was delighted….just before 7 o’clock I started for the Albert Hall. Walked to Notting Hill gate then took a bus. The meeting was not till 8 o’clock but Miss Porter had told me to be there by 7 o’clock. We had seats in the Balcony and it was a great strain to hear the speakers. It was a meeting of the National Women’s Social and Political Union – and Mrs Pankhurst, newly released from Prison with the other six was there, and she filled the chair that we had thought to see empty. It was an exciting meeting. The speakers were Miss Christabel Pankhurst, Mrs Pethick Lawrence, Miss Annie Kenney, Mrs Martel and the huge sums of money they collected. It was like magic the way it flowed in. It was all just a little too theatrical but very wonderful. Miss Annie Kenney interested me the most – she seems so “inspired” quite a second Joan of Arc. I was very pleased not to be missing so wonderful an evening and I think it very nice of Miss Porter to have thought of me. She is quite a nice girl of the modern but “girlie” sort – a Cheltenham girl and quite clever – but very like a lot of other girls. Coming out we met, strangely enough, Mrs Wright and Alexandra (Gladys was speaking at Peckham) and after saying good-bye to Miss Porter I walked home with them as far as Linden Gardens. Got in at 11.30 very tired indeed and glad of my supper. Mother was waiting up.

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops. In stock at London Review of Books Bookshop, Foyles, National Archives Bookshop.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

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Kate Frye’s Diary: Canvassing for the Progressives in North Kensington,1907

Another extract from Kate Frye’s manuscript diary. An edited edition of later entries (from 1911), recording her work as a suffrage organiser, is  published as Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s suffrage diary.

The 'Morning Leader' supported the Progressives and in late-February 1907 Kate laid this leaflet in between the pages of her diary

The ‘Morning Leader’ supported the Progressives and in late-February 1907 Kate laid this leaflet in between the pages of her diary

The LCC elections were due to be held on 2 March 1907; Kate and her family supported the Progressive Party. In fact, before becoming an MP, her father had been an LCC councillor on the Progressive ticket.

Dramatis Personae for these entries:

Sir Weetman Pearson, Lady Denman’s father, in 1910 became Lord Cowdray and it was as ‘Lady Cowdray’ that his wife was to be involved with a number of suffrage organisations.  Lady Pearson was, according to Lady Denman’s biographer, ‘determined to become a leading political and social hostess’ and the Pearsons’ house at 16 Carlton House Terrace, its opulent interior decorated in the mid-19th century by Owen Jones in the islamic style, provided a perfect setting. As we shall read, Kate, who was something of an expert on these matters, rated the Pearsons’ tea very highly.

H.Y. Stanger: Liberal MP for North Kensington, the seat once held by Kate’s father, in February 1908 introduced a women’s suffrage bill, which passed its second reading before being blocked. This was the greatest progress a bill had made since 1897.

Thomas McKinnon Wood: member of the London County Council for Central Hackney (1892-1909) – leader of Progressive Party (1898-1907). Elected MP for a Glasgow constituency, 1906.

Mr Jephson: Henry Jephson, retired civil servant, who was standing again as a Progressive member for North Kensington on the LCC.

Violette Mary Doake (b c. 1888): lived with her parents at 24 Stanley Gardens, Kensington. In 1892 her father had been elected as a Progressive member of the LCC for Kensington North; unsurprisingly the Doake family was staunchly suffragist.

Thursday February 21st 1907

At 2.30 Mother and I went by train from Notting Hill Gate to Charing Cross and walked through the Horse Guards and up the Duke of Yorks steps to Carlton House Terrace – Sir Wheetman [sic] Pearson’s house – by invitation of Lord and Lady Denman to a drawing Room meeting to hear Mr McKinnon Wood – Mr Wilks and the work we could do for the Progressives at the L.C.C. elections.

Nearly all ladies there. Lord Denman was a sort of Chairman & both he and Lady Denman spoke – she seems very nice. My dear friend Mr McKinnon Wood spoke again most beautifully – I do admire him. Of course I knew it all but I dare say some the facts came new to a good many there. Mr Stanger, Mr Jephson and Mr Percy Harris were there.

There was a most gorgeous tea downstairs afterwards it really was quite perfect – such cakes – in such quantities – I made a pig of myself and eat [ate] three and I had my tea and milk poured out of solid gold articles. I really did enjoy the party and the house is wonderful – what a position – looking out on the Park.

Friday February 22nd 1907

I dressed myself. John [her fiance] came at 7.30 to dinner and afterwards Daddie took he, Agnes and I up to the Horbury Rooms [Ladbroke Road] to the Opposition L.C.C. Candidates’ meeting – Mr Davis and Major Skinner. Well I thought it would be interesting but I never expected to be so thoroughly amused.

The Chairman was so funny and Harcourt-Smith such a noodle – a Dickens character with an eye glass. And as for Major Skinner I have never seen or heard the like really. He didn’t seem sharp and made quite an object of himself. He tried to propitiate the ladies – I never heard anything so awful. I blushed for him. He kept right away from the question of the L.C.C. altogether.  The only decent man there, for though Mr Whittiker Hampson speaks well, I wouldn’t trust him, was Mr Hume-Williams who opposed Mr Stanger at the Parliamentary Elections. He is a gentleman and speaks well, but he was not convincing – none of them were – they all talked nonsense – have no programme of work at all to bring forward. Their great cry is ‘give us a chance’ and they tell awful stories about the rates, which have really nothing to do with the County Council. It will be a real grief to me if those two dreadful people get in.

John, a thoroughly conservative spirit, doggedly tory, to the backbone was quite turned over by them though he thinks he upholds their views. I do so hate him to be a ‘Moderate’ thinker. We came back and talked them over and laughed merrily at their expense till John had to go at 11 o’clock.

Wednesday February 27th 1907

When I got home at 5 o’clock I found a note and bundle from Gladys Wright asking me to deliver some Women’s Suffragist things. So after tea Agnes went out with me and we did Arundel Gardens and Elgin Crescent – a tremendous number of Women Voters in both. They were papers urging the Women to use their Vote. I feel rather shaky as they are sure to Vote Conservative but that is a cowardly way of looking at the matter, I know.

Thursday February 28th 1907

Went off to the [North Kensington Liberal] Club – Mother, Agnes and Florence [the Fryes’ maid] were there – and the room was full. Miss Jephson, Miss Doake, Mr McArthur, Mr Lewis, Mr Hatt and the usual workers and lots of people I did not know all working at top speed.

LCC election 1907 1Saturday March 2nd 1907

The great London County Council Election day at last and, very fortunately, a beautiful day for it. I should have been canvassing all this week, much as I hate the work – but I am so interested in the Election – but I have felt so awfully seedy I simply hadn’t the strength for it…Agnes and I went to the Pembridge Ward Committee Room and got some work to do. I had Westbourne Grove to do and it took me till 4.30. Mother and Agnes went together. I got so tired I felt nearly dead when I had taken the cards back and came home to tea. But I couldn’t rest and after tea Mother and I walked up to the Golborne Ward Committee Room.

It is depressing work in this Ward. There is no enthusiasm – but up there there was very little excitement amongst the workers – and my heart sank though most of them were cheerful. We saw Mr Jephson in the Committee Room. Miss Jephson, Mrs and Miss Doake, Mrs Willis and lots of workers. Mr Jephson was flying about madly in his Motor Car. Mother and I did three streets – Blagrove Road and two other long ones and kept on till within a few minutes of eight o’clock.

I got so excited and interested that I don’t know how I managed to keep going as I did. I did feel ill but I did some good work. Got one woman to vote who had never used her vote before. I had almost to hold her by force and interest her by telling her how I worked to get a vote. She decided she would go if she was driven. So I sent Mother off to find a carriage and I waited and hung on to her. It was so long coming I flew into the middle of the road and managed to stop Mr Jephson’s car almost by main force it seemed to me – but just then Mrs Widgery drove up in a carriage and she took the woman and a man who went to look after her.

Sunday March 3rd 1907

Florence brought me the news and later the paper. Jephson and Pope beaten and the whole of London swept clear by the Moderates. ‘God help London’ I say since London does not seem inclined to help itself.

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops. In stock at London Review of Books Bookshop, Foyles, National Archives Bookshop.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

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Kate Frye’s Diary: ‘Paddington Pandemonium’

In the following diary entry Kate describes the pandemonium that occurred at a December 1907 suffrage meeting organised by the North Kensington Local Committee of the Central Society for Women’s Suffrage – the non-militant London NUWSS society – chaired by Mrs Millicent Fawcett.  From Kate’s account the main culprits were medical students from nearby St Mary’s Hospital and from University College Hospital in Bloomsbury, such student having had, through the ages, a reputation for unruly behaviour. From Kate’s observation, the stories of stinkbombs and the release of mice, specifically intended to upset the genteel female audience at suffrage meetings, were all too true.

Lady Grove (1862 -1926) was a leading Liberal suffragist and author of The Human Woman, 1908. The Paddington Baths, in Queen’s Road, Bayswater, were soon to be demolished to make way for an enlarged Whiteley’s department store.

Thursday 5th December 1907 [25 Arundel Gardens, North Kensington]

At 2 o’clock Agnes and I started off to Linden Gardens and called for Alexandra Wright and several of her helpers and we all walked to the Paddington Baths to help arrange the room for the meeting in the evening. There was a good bit to do – numbering the chairs – partitioning them off and hanging up banners and posters etc. Left [home again] just before 7 o’clock in a bus to Royal Oak and went to the Paddington Baths for the London (Central) Society’s meeting for Women’s Suffrage. Gladys and Alexandra have been weeks getting it up and I did no end of clerical work for it at Bourne End. We were the first Stewards to arrive after Gladys and Alexandra and were decorated with rosettes and given our directions. Lots of the women were very nervous of a row. My department was the gallery, to look after people up there and give invitations for a private meeting next week.

The people came in thick and fast and the doors were opened at 7.30 and with the first group of young men below in the free seats I knew what would happen. The place was soon hot, bubbling over with excitement, and I had my work cut out keeping gangways clear and looking after people and telling them they would be safe. We had expected an exciting evening but this realised our worst expectations. It was Bedlam let loose. A couple of hundred students from St Mary’s and University College Hospitals arrived and insisted on sitting together and never ceased all the evening singing, shouting, blowing tin trumpets, letting off crackers, letting loose mice and, what is worse, scenting the floor with a most terrible-smelling chemical.

Report from the ‘Daily Mail’ 6 December 1907, clipped by Kate and laid in her diary

From the very start they never gave a single speaker a moments hearing. Mrs Fawcett was in the Chair and Lady Groveand others spoke and they went on with the meeting to the bitter end – and bitter it must have been to the speakers. I never heard a word. I felt too angry to be frightened though I must own I did not like the fireworks and saw the most appalling possibilities in that frantic howling mob of mad animals. Agnes owns to being terrified – all the more credit to her for sticking to her place amongst them and she was with them all the evening. I felt mad at not being there in the midst of them. When I could leave I just went down and spoke to John, who I saw standing near Agnes. She had decorated him as a Steward to help in case the worst happened.

I went back to my post until I was no longer any good there and then I went into the very midst of the seething mass and talked to any of them I could get at. Just to silence them, as I did for a few minutes at a time, was a triumph. Cries of ‘Oh I think I like Suffragettes’ as I went amongst them and, then, ‘He is flirting with a Suffragette’ taken up and sung by them all. I spoke like a Mother to several and smiled at them. If they had only known my true feelings I don’t think they would have been so polite to me. Great credit to all the women in the building is due – not only the Stewards – but the audience there.  There was never any excitement or panic amongst them and only one Stewardess failed us. She, poor thing, was so terrified she bolted without waiting for hat or coat – but of course we keep that dark. The men Stewards were very good but quite powerless to stop the noise and hubbub. And what could four policemen do? It was an organised ‘Rag’ and nothing but a force of police to outnumber them could have stopped them. They longed for a fight and said so – and no end of them had most terrible looking clubbed sticks which they brandished. We did the only possible thing, I consider. Kept as much order as we could and tried to avoid bloodshed. We had a little unfortunately when, after the meeting was over, they charged for the Platform, sweeping everyone before them. Very fortunately there were large exit doors each side of the platform and most of the people got out of them. I was flung aside and then followed them up. They tore down as many banners as they could and stole one and tore down all the posters. They were like wild cats. The policemen chased them round a little but we would not allow any arrests to be made. The firework ringleader was caught but allowed to go. I spoke to Mrs Wright – red with rage. Poor things, we were all either red or white. Mr Willis, Mrs and Miss Doake and several others. Mr Percy Harris was Stewarding. One man Steward got a most awful crack on the ear and was considerably blooded – he looked awful. Several of the boys had their collars torn off and became very proud in consequence. It was a great wonder and a still greater mercy that more damage was not done. I felt so responsible for the ordinary public who had paid their money. I could only hope to get over the evening safely for their sakes. Personally I wished and still wish to smash the Boys, though at times I could not help laughing. They were not nice boys – all plain and common looking – mostly undersized and no gentlemanly looking one amongst them. I was glad to notice that as I hope they are not the best we can show in our hospitals.

After the general public had gone the police sent word that it was impossible to clear the hall while there was a woman left in it so we left with Mrs and Miss Doake and all came back in the bus with Mrs Willis. Miss Doake said she had never enjoyed a night so much in her life before. I cannot say the same. It was a terrible experience. We could not lose that terrible smell from our noses and mouths. I could taste it through everything at supper. John came home with us and did not leave till after 12o’clock. Agnes and I were too excited to go to bed and sat talking of our experiences. Lots of people will be made all the keener through it, but a great many will be very disgusted I fear.’

As you can see from this note, carefully preserved by Kate, Mrs Fawcett’s meeting was re-arranged for early 1908 – to be held in the safety of Bertha Mason’s house in nearby Hyde Park Square.

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops. In stock at London Review of Books Bookshop, Foyles, National Archives Bookshop.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

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Collecting Suffrage: Punch cartoon

21 January 1912 – full page – ‘The Suffrage Split’. Sir George Askwith (the charismatic industrial conciliator), as ‘Fairy Peacemaker’, has tamed the dragon of the Cotton Strike – and Asquith, wrestling to keep a seat on the Cabinet horse turns to him ‘Now that you’ve charmed yon dragon I shall need ye to stop the strike inside this fractious gee-gee.’

In very good condition £10 plus £1 postage.

To buy contact: e.crawford@sphere20.freeserve.co.uk

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Suffrage Stories: ‘Madame Mantalini’

Since 2009, when details of the 1911 census were released, I have (with, for a time, Dr Jill Liddington) been investigating how the women of the country responded to the call issued by the more militant suffrage societies to boycott the census. In the process I have discovered women of a suffrage inclination of whom, until now, suffrage history has known nothing.

One of these was a ‘Miss S. Marsden’, whose census form was delivered to her at 69 Church Street, Kensington, and who refused the enumerator any details about herself. However, Miss Marsden did not leave the form blank, writing on it one of the longest statements that I have so far encountered.  Although the right edge of the census form is badly damaged, creating gaps in her comments, I think we can get the gist.

‘I, Mdme Mantalini, a municipal voter and tax payer, refuse to fill in this census paper, as I have no intention of furnishing this government with information and thereby helping them to legislate for women without obtaining their consent or first consulting them in the [missing words] effective way possible & extending the franchise to duly qualified women. As a responsible, law-abiding citizen I have conducted my business for sixteen years; as an employer of labour I have [contributed?] to the wealth of the state and in return I have been taxed for the upkeep of no 10 Downing Street. No 10 Downing Street, the official residence of the prime minister, but converted by his wife into a show-room for a French [dress maker?] (free of all duty and taxation) to exhibit his Paris models and take orders from them to be executed in Paris. I [missing words] with very few exceptions the dressmaking establishments in England are all owned by women, & only women & [missing words] workers. It therefore comes to this, that the only way open to us to protest at ‘our trade’ being ruined in [missing words] our taxes, is to drive home to the government by every method available that women are determined [missing words – perhaps ‘not to be governed’] without their consent.’

Would that not whet any researcher’s appetite? Who was Miss Marsden/Mdme Mantalini? What had Margot Asquith been up to?

In fact the second question was the easier to answer. An inspection of The Times archive revealed that in May 1909 Margot Asquith had been called to task by drapers’ associations from around the country for inviting the Parisian designer Paul Poiret to show dresses in 10 Downing Street.

Poiret then was the epitome of chic – designing dresses that relied on draping, rather than tailoring – so much easier to wear – and promoting hobble skirts, harem pants and kimono coats – designs such as these.

Poiret

In response to a letter of complaint from an MP,  Mrs Asquith explained,  ‘I received in my private rooms at tea from 20 to 25 of my personal friends and a well-known French costumier, whose models can be bought in any London shop, brought some specimens for the inspection of myself and my guests. It was a purely personal occasion.’ In fact, such was the rumpus, that henceforward Margot Asquith was obliged to patronize British costumiers, such as Lucile  although probably not, I fear, Madame Mantalini.

I thought at first that when Miss Marsden referred to herself on the census paper as ‘Mdme Mantalini’ it was merely as short-hand to describe her position as a dressmaker – that being the name of the dressmaking establishment at which, in Nicholas Nickleby, Kate Nickleby is apprenticed.  But, consulting my 1908 London street directory, I found that the shop at 69 Church Street (which is still there) was, indeed, that of ‘Mrs Sybil Mantalini’. It was then only a short step to establish that Mrs Mantalini was, in fact, Miss Sybil Marsden, who was on the London Electoral Register by dint of her occupation of those premises, and the question of’ ‘Who was Miss S. Marsden?’ was solved.

But now I was hooked. Who was Miss Sybil Marsden? Why was she such an outspoken dressmaker?

I discovered that she had 9 siblings and in 1911 was living at the family home, 82 RedcliffeGardens in South Kensington, with her mother and one unmarried sister. Her father, Algernon Moses Marsden, had been a fine art dealer but, by 1901, had been declared bankrupt several times. His background was most interesting; he had declined to enter the family’s successful clothing business, clearly preferring the more elevated association with ‘art’.

Algernon Moses Marsden by James Tissot

Algernon Moses Marsden by James Tissot

Marsden was by all accounts – mainly in the bankruptcy reports – an engaging fellow – as is evident in the portrait of him by James Tissot, painted in 1877, when Sybil was four-years-old. At that time Marsden was Tissot’s dealer, but gambling and high-living proved his downfall. It would appear that after his final bankruptcy in 1901 he removed himself to New York, where he died in 1920. I can now see that the choice of the name ‘Madame Mantalini’ may have been even more to the point than I first thought. In Nicholas Nickleby it is Mr Mantalini’s extravagance that resulted in the bankruptcy of his wife’s business – an awful warning to Sybil Marsden.  No wonder Algernon’s daughter had little faith in the ability of men to manage her affairs.

Epilogue

The cinéaste members of my family play the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game (whereby any named film actor has to be connected with fellow-actor KB by links covering no more than 6 films). I am hopeless at that – but think I might be a contender in Six Degrees of Garrett. This particular case is easy: Sybil Marsden, Algernon Marsden, James Tissot, J.M. Brydon, Agnes and Rhoda Garrett. As I discuss in Enterprising Women: the Garrets and their circle,  the two young women were undergoing their architectural training with Brydon in 1873, at a time when he was working on the design of a new studio for Tissot, attached to the artist’s St John’s Wood house. Did they go on a site visit? Had they perhaps even seen in the flesh, as it were, the tiger skin and the fashionable blue vase, that serve to emphasise Algenon Marsden’s exoticism and good taste.

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Kate Frye’s Suffrage Diary: 3 December 1906

Kate Frye coverKate’s family had always taken an interest in politics; her father had been Liberal MP for North Kensington in the 1890s and into the 20th century her mother was the president of the North Kensington Women’s Liberal Association. However, the meeting described below is the first occasion that Kate mentions in her diary her attendance at a specifically ‘suffrage’ meeting and of the disturbances that had been caused by the WSPU’s ‘rowdy attacks’.

Monday 3 December 1906

At 8 o’clock [evening] Agnes [Kate’s elder sister] and I went off to KensingtonTown Hall to a Woman’s Suffrage meeting – got up by the Central Society. Lady Frances Balfour was presiding. We went by bus – when we got there the large hall was packed. Alexandra Wright was at the top of the stairs and directed us up to the overflow meeting and that was packed too. After a bit the speakers came in to us – the Hon Mrs Bertrand Russell, Miss Gore Booth, Lady Frances Balfour and Mr Cameron Corbett M.P. I heard excellent speeches all of them – they really did put the case in a nutshell and were most instructive and interesting.

Then Gladys Wright came and fetched me out and came and asked me to act as a Steward and collect – then later she went in for Agnes – and we both did what we could. We collected in the Gallery first – then later I was stationed to get the people as they came out. It was very amusing really – and I got so hot and excited – off my head with it – we certainly are in the thick of things always. Some of the people gave a lot – others shook their heads and frowned. One man said I wanted too much – to marry as well as a Vote. I had quite a flirtation on the stairs with a big smart young man – who stopped to ask me a question – he didn’t seem to know anything about anything and when he said the speaker had referred to Earl Percy as ‘half asleep’ – I said ‘That is true about a great many people’ – he did laugh.

I am afraid I felt I was more like a helper at a Bazaar than at so grave a thing as a Woman’s Suffrage Meeting – but then it is so hard for me to be serious about anything – but I am in earnest – I really do feel a great belief in the need of the Vote for Women if only as a means of Education. I feel my prayer for Women in the words of George Meredith ‘More brains, Oh Lord, more brains.’ But we are coming along and not slowly by any means. Of course all these rowdy attacks on the Ministers and these imprisonments have sounded coarse and unpleasant and the jokery made of it most bad for the cause – but women have waited patiently for so long the sort of women who have gone for the matter in this rowdy method are not the best educated or most refined amongst our members.

At this meeting every thing passed off in a most orderly dignified spirit – and the speeches from the women were delightful and must have come as a revelation to many of the audience. There was a declaration there for any working woman there who cared to sign – a number did – I did – as I have a profession [Kate was a rather unsuccessful actress]. Naturally they don’t want crowds of names without any meaning or strength in them. We came home after hearing the amount collected nearly £20 – about the cost of getting up a meeting – the reason for the collection. Bus to Notting Hill – got in soon after 10.30 – in a frenzy of excitement.

Campaigning for the Vote: Kate Parry Frye’s Suffrage Diary edited by Elizabeth Crawford

For a full description of the book click here

Wrap-around paper covers, 226 pp, over 70 illustrations, all drawn from Kate Frye’s personal archive.

ISBN 978 1903427 75 0

Copies available from Francis Boutle Publishers, or from Elizabeth Crawford – elizabeth.crawford2017@outlook.com  (£14.99 +UK postage £3. Please ask for international postage cost), or from all good bookshops – and Amazon.

'Campaigning for the Vote' - Front and back cover of wrappers
‘Campaigning for the Vote’ – Front and back cover of wrappers

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Suffragette postcards: suffragettes and policemen 2

Here is another card in the ‘Philco Series’, titled  ‘SUFFRAGETTES ARE GOING ABOUT STICKING BILLS IN PROMINENT PLACES’ and in this particular case that is pasting a ‘Votes for Women’ on the back of a policeman, who is in the process of accosting another bill-sticking suffragette. Needless to say the women are the usual stereotypical trilby-wearing, bespectacled harridens. In the scene a pillar box and a dog have also been plastered with V f W posters. The message on the reverse – written in pencil from the same sender to the same recipient as that of the card in the previous ‘Collecting Suffrage’ post – that is Win to Mrs James – reads  ‘And the best of wishes for a happy Christmas. The suffragettes what and how they do things in London.’ Very good – unposted £45 post free. NOW SOLD

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Suffragette postcards: suffragettes and policemen

The increased activity of the women’s suffrage campaign in the early years of the 20th century coincided with the golden age of the postcard. It proved to be a subject very popular with the burgeoning number of commercial postcard publishers and cards with a ‘suffragette’ theme outnumber those relating to other contemporary campaigns – such as Tariff Reform and Home Rule.

Without too much effort, anyone interested can still build up a collection of cards reflecting the varying views of Edwardian society on women’s desire for citizenship – and their methods of achieving it. The suffrage societies themselves all produced cards – portraits of their leaders or photographs of great suffrage occasions – although they are vastly outnumbered by cards produced by the commercial publishers. 

The incongruence of women battling with policemen – as on ‘Black Friday’ in November 1910 – certainly caught the publishers’ attention and there are many variations on the theme. This card was published by Philco Publishers, whose office was in Holborn Place – very close to WSPU headquarters. This card was not posted but is written to ‘Mrs James’. The message reads ‘I do not know what you will think of this. But this is suffragettes in vengeance and in their battle array.’

The  stereotypical harridan (trilby hat, glasses, high-colouring, big nose) wearing ‘Votes for Women’ sash wields her umbrella as she kicks a policeman. In the background another, similar, scene is enacted. There is a tall clock tower – which might just be intended as Big Ben – at the very back of the scene, attached to a misty building. This card, which is in good condition, was one of a series. It is available for sale from me: £45 post free. NOW SOLD

See the August 2012 issue of BBC History Magazine for Prof June Purvis’s article on ‘suffragette’ cards published by commercial publishers and click here for details of her very interesting and informative accompanying podcast (June’s piece begins 20 minutes into the recording).

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